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Family Subtree Diagram : .Artemissia Payne (1844)

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child) (eight children) (four children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (five children) (a child) (a child) (three children) (six children) (seven children) (four children) (two children) (a child) (two children) (two children) (five children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (five children) (a child) (four children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (nine children) (four children) (nine children) (six children) (two children) (four children) (a child) (five children) (a child) (two children) (five children) (a child) (six children) (a child) (five children) (five children) (a child) (fourteen children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (two children) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (three children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (five children) (six children) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (eight children) (six children) (eight children) (four children) (three children) (seven children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) 1844 - 1913 Artemissia Payne 68 68 1819 - 1896 Nancy Scott 77 77 1813 - 1897 Robert Payne 83 83 1839 Willis Green Payne 1840 Samuel Henry Payne 1842 James Nicholas Payne 1843 Thomas Harrison Payne 1848 Virginia Payne 1850 Priscilla Payne 1853 John Allen Payne 1853 Lewis Cass Payne 1855 Moses Green Payne 1857 Letitia Payne 1860 Minor Peyton Payne 1864 Matthew P. Payne 1865 Simeon Buchanan Payne 1787 - 1857 Moses Payne 70 70 1787 - 1872 Judith Beard 84 84 1809 Oaty T. Payne 1816 Lemuel H. Payne 1818 Green B. Payne 1818 Matilda Payne 1820 John 1822 Joseph Payne 1824 William A. Payne 1825 James E. Payne 1827 Mary Payne 1834 Sarah Payne 1758 - 1829 Sarah Ellis 71 71 1779 Hannah Payne 1784 Elizabeth Payne 1785 William Payne 1785 John Payne 1789 Ellis Payne 1796 Nancy Payne 1760 - 1807 Edward Beard 47 47 1760 - 1825 Sarah Walker 65 65 1780 Samuel Beard 1783 Robert Beard 1784 Charles Beard 1785 Agatha Beard 1785 Elijar Beard 1785 Eliza Beard 1786 Edward Beard 1787 - 1854 Pleasant Beard 67 67 1790 Rutha Pearson 1788 John Beard 1789 Sarah Beard 1740 - 1767 Robert Walker 27 27 "Will of Robert Walker, 1766, Bedford County, Virginia Will Book October the 23d 1766 In the Name of God Amen I Robert Walker of the County of Bedford being in a Low State of Helth Though in my proper Sences Blessed be God for it I do make my Last Will and Testament first of all I Desire all my Just Debts be paid and I desire that my Land Shall not be Sold I Desire Such things to be Sold as Shall be Seen proper by my Executers then my will and Desire is that Agatha Walker Shall have in possesion Tom and Joe and all my Movables Estate During her Life or Widdow Hood as Long as She Behaves Well and at her Death or Marrage shall fall from her then my Will and Desire is that my Son Elijah Walker Shall Heir Two Hundred Eacres of Land at the Uper end of the Land Where I Now Live to him and his Heirs forever and the Rest to be Divided amonge my wife and Two Daughters Saley and Judea to my Two Daughters and There Heirs forever then my Will and Desire is t hat I do Leave William Walker and Valentine Corley Executors of my Said Will and Testament then my Will and Desire is that there be no Appaisement of my Estate
Robert Walker
In the presents of us
James Walker, Andrew Turner, Henry Pigg"

Apparently, Robert died in 1767 as that is the year his will was probated in Bedford County, Virginia.

Here is a description of the land:

"The land was originally granted to John Macklannan by patent 26 Jun 1755 [VA PB 31:459], and sold by him to Robert Walker on 9 Feb 1761 [Bedford DB1:328].  In both documents, the land is described as "400a on both sides
of Callaway's Waggon Road and on the head of Reedy Creek."

adonn4life@aol.com
1740 - 1825 Agatha 85 85 1761 Elijah Walker "Elijah Walker
Campbell County VA Personal Property Tax List 1791"

and then, Joseph and Agatha (Agnes in document) Simmons, Sally and Edward Baird, and Judith (Judah in document) and20Benjamin Martin sold their portion of the land.  They lived in Franklin County, Virginia at the time of the sale.

"Campbell Co. DB3:184, 5 Jun 1792
From: Joseph Simmons & ux, Agnes, Edward Baird & ux, Sally, and Benjamin Martin & ux, Judah, all of Franklin County
To: James Hunter
For 120£; about 200 acres, it being all the remainder or balance of Land whereon Elijah Walker now lives, and bounded by his dividing line when run agreeable to his father Walker's Last Will and Testament, thence round the
old patent lines to said div line to first station. [only bounds given]"

adonn4life@aol.com
1762 Judith Walker 1715 - 1752 William Walker 37 37 1720 - 1767 Judith 47 47 1741 James Walker 1742 Warren Walker 1743 William Walker 1744 Joel Walker 1690 Robert Walker 1780 - 1846 Nicholas Scott 66 66 1793 - 1876 Mary Pate 83 83 1752 - 1816 James Scott 64 64 1720 - 1794 William Scott 74 74 1722 - 1805 Lucretia James 83 83 1740 Thomas Scott 1742 William Scott 1744 Charles Scott 1766 Sarah Elizabeth Scott 1748 - 1794 Acton Scott 46 46 Dorcas Wright 1749 John Scott 1750 George Scott 1754 Evan Scott 1757 Joseph H. Scott 1764 - 1840 Obediah Scott 76 76 1769 Peter A. Scott 1700 Samuel Scott 1722 Thomas James Alice Garland 1688 - 1725 John James 37 37 1691 Justina Thruston Thruston James John James May James 1720 Christopher James 1668 John William James http://www.ericjames.org/html/fam/fam22774.htm

At age 16 he joined Protestant forces in Ireland w/ William of Orange against James II. Raised from rank of Cadet to Capt. Established home at Dromore, County Down 
1665 Anne Wyndham William James Elizabeth James 1635 - 1691 Thomas Wyndham 56 56 Elizabeth Croke 1668 John Thruston Elizabeth Carey 1637 - 1717 Edward Thruston 80 80 1644 - 1670 Ann Loveing 26 26 1670 - 1670 Thomasine Thruston 7d 7d 1606 - 1675 John Thruston 69 69 D. 1647 Thomasine Warren 1610 - 1665 Thomas Loving 55 55 1614 Elizabeth Kingston 1640 Charles Loving Thomas Thruston John Thruston Grace Thruston Thomasine Thruston Alice Thruston Malachy Thruston Robert Thruston John Thruston Melicious Thruston Simon Thruston Justian Thurston Ann Thruston Malachias Thruston 1010 Gunnora d'Aunou There seems to be a majority of sources that indicate that she was sister, not daughter of Fulk; and possibly, somehow, a niece of Gilbert Count of Brionne. I will stick with Turton, even though he is somewhat unreliable, because the other pedigrees don't seem very clear (and reliable) to me either.

Following is a post-em from Curt Hofemann giving, conflicting information on Gunnora:

First, it's Aunou, not Anjou . . Flwg are my notes:

parents: Gonnor (Gunnor) was the daughter of Baldric the Teuton, and a niece of Gilbert, Count of Brionne. [Ref: McBride2 citing Burke's p118-120, CP VI p498-503, Wurts p47-70], father: Baudri "the German", father of Nicholas de Bacqueville, Fulk de Aunou, Robert de Courcy, and Gunnor [Ref: TAF 21 Aug 2000 citing: Keats-Rohan "Domesday Book and the Malets: Patrimony and the Private Histories of Public Lives" in *Nottingham Medieval Studies* xli (1997), 18] Gunnora, sister of Fulk de Aunou is not daughter of Osmund, but of Baudri. [Ref: TAF 26 Aug 2000] Fulk d'Aunou had a sister Gunnor [Ref: TAF: 21 Aug 2000]

Research note 1: father Fulk son of Baldric [Ref: Turton]

Research note 2: Gilbert's wife Gonnor (Gunnor) was the daughter of Baldric the Teuton, and a niece of Gilbert, Count of Brionne. [Ref: McBride2 citing Burke's p118-120, CP VI p498-503, Wurts p47-70]

Research note 3: She (Elisabeth Van Houts) also argues that Robert confused things, that it was Baudri "the German", father of Nicholas de Bacqueville, Fulk de Aunou, Robert de Courcy, and Gunnor wife of Gilbert Crispin, who married the niece of Duchess Gunnor, while it was Nicholas's wife, Gertrude, who was niece of Gilbert of Brionne. [Ref: TAF 21 Aug 2000 citing: Keats-Rohan "Domesday Book and the Malets: Patrimony and the Private Histories of Public Lives" in *Nottingham Medieval Studies* xli (1997), 18] note: this implies the Fulk was Gunnora's brother, not father...:

Research note 4: First of all, while there is extensive debate, it is not generally fealt (sic) that Fulk d'Aunou, son of Baudri the German is the same as Fulk "de Alneio", son of Osmund of Centemvilliers. (For example, Wace appears to
distinguish the two toponyms.) Thus Gunnora, sister of Fulk de Aunou is not daughter of Osmund, but of Baudri. Likewise Gunnora de Aunou married, not Gilbert de Brionne, but Gilbert Crispin. Gilbert de Brionne comes into play as supposed uncle of Baudri's wife, although this seems chronologically impossible... [Ref: TAF 26 Aug 2000]

Research note 5: ...based on the fact that Fulk d'Aunou had a sister Gunnor, Keats-Rohan has suggested that these two somehow got switched, and that it was Baldric who married the Gunnorid, while Nicholas married Gilbert's niece. This works better chronologically, since Gilbert de Brionne was two generations after Gunnor, his niece three and Nicholas four, while the wife of Nicholas would be just one, or perhaps two generation removed from Gunnor. Reversing them as Keats-Rohan suggests makes the wife four, and the husband three or four (because some of the nieces appear to have been grandnieces). [Ref: TAF: 21 Aug 2000]

Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968 Page: 134

Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
Page: Leo van de Pas, 3 Jan 1999

Change Date: 17 DEC 2006
1049 William de Braose 1030 Ann de Clare 1612 - 1676 Francis Wyndham 64 64 1616 - 1676 Anne Gerard 60 60 D. 1676 Thomas Wyndham Elizabeth Conygsby Richard Conygsby Edmund Wyndham Margaret Chamberlayne Thomas Gerard Isabel Willoughby 1494 - 1573 John Wyndham 79 79 1506 Elizabeth Sydenham John Sydenham Elizabeth Hody 1466 Thomas Wyndham Eleanor Scrope John Wyndham Margaret Howard John Wyndham Margery Clifton 1442 Richard Le Scrope Eleanor Washburn 1378 - 1455 John Le Scrope 77 77 1391 - 1466 Elizabeth Chaworth 75 75 Richard Chamberlayne 1418 - 1459 Henry Le Scrope 40 40 Lord Bolton 1417 - 1498 Elizabeth Le Scrope 81 81 1440 Margaret Le Scrope ~1439 - 1503 Elizabeth Scrope 64 64 1394 - 1420 Richard Le Scrope 26 26 3rd Lord Scrope, of Bolton 1348 Roger Le Scrope 1366 Margaret Tiptoft Richard Le Scrope 1328 - 1378 Blanche De La Pole 50 50 1271 - 1336 Henry Le Scrope 65 65 Lord of Croft 1290 - 1357 Margaret De Ros 67 67 1320 Isabella Le Scrope 1345 - 1403 Stephen Le Scrope 58 58 1350 Margaret de Welles 1312 - 1391 Henry Scrope 78 78 1317 - 1336 Joan Agnes 19 19 1280 - 1340 Geoffrey Le Scrope 60 60 1285 - 1331 Ivette de Ros 46 46 1250 - 1312 William Le Scrope 62 62 1253 Constance de Newsom Thomas de Newsom Gille de Newsom 1224 - 1296 William Le Scrope 72 72 1183 - 1218 Henry Le Scrope 35 35 1187 Juliane Brune D. 1225 Simon Le Scrope Imgoline 1134 Robert Le Scrope 1103 Hugh Le Scrope 1080 Walter le Scrope 1056 Simon Le Scrope 1072 Maud d'Arques 1095 - 1174 William de Vernon de Reviers 79 79 William de Vernon [2nd son of Richard]; great grandfather of [Richard de Vernon who married Avice in 1171]. [Burke's Peerage]

Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
Page: 126

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 2884
1090 - 1165 Lucy de Tancarvile 75 75 1052 Beatrix Malet 1005 Godfroi d' Arques 1015 Amelie de Rouen 0975 Gozelin de Rouen 0980 Emmaline de Normandie 1023 - 1071 William Malet 48 48 # Note:

    William Malet, of Granville, Normandy; also held lands in Lincs before 1066 (possibly by virtue of his mother's putative status of Englishwoman); granted the feudal Barony of Eye, Suffolk, following the Conquest, in which he was one of William I's chief lieutenants, being allegedly given the task by William of burying Harold's body after Hastings; Sheriff of Yorks 1068; married Hesilia Crispin (living 1086), gggdau of Rollo The Dane, Duke of Normandy, and died c1071. [Burke's Peerage]

---------------------------------------------------

    William, according to some, was grandson of Lady Godiva & brother of Harold Godwyn's wife, while not necessarily entirely true, probably there was some relationship. I have William's mother as a daughter of Godiva's husband Leofric Earl of Mercia, by an earlier wife or mistress. There is conjecture that William's father one of the men who accompanied Emma of Normandy to England in 1002 for her marriage with Aethelred.

---------------------------------------------------

    According to Crispin and Macary, "William (Guillaume) Malet de Graville stands out as one of the most imposing figures at the Conquest. There can be no doubt about his presence there, which is subscribed to by William of Poitiers, Guy of Amiens, Orderic Vital, and all the historians of this epoch. So much has been placed on record concerning him that just a few facts of his life will be recited here. He was probably descended from Gerard, a Scandinavian prince and companion of Duke Rollo, which gave the name of the fief of Gerardville or Graville, near Havre. Robert, the eldest son, occurs in a document of about 990 in Normandy. On his mother's side William Malet was of Anglo-Saxon origin, for she was probably the daughter of Leofric, Earl of Mercia, and Godwa or Godgifu, the supposed sister of Thorold the Sheriff in the time of Edward the Confessor, and therefore the aunt of Edwin and Morcar, Earls of Northumberland. He was nearly killed in the battle of Hastings but was rescued by the sire de Montfort and William of Vieuxpont, and was appointed by William the Conqueror to take charge of the body of Harold, a statement that has been disputed. The consensus of opinion favors it, and it is most logical if William Malet's mother was as stated the sister of Algar II., 7th Earl of Mercia, who was the father of Alditha, wife of Harold. He accompanied King William at the reduction of Nottingham and York in 1068, for which he was rewarded with the shreivalty of land in that county. Gilbert de Gand and Robert Fitz Richard were also commanders in this expedition. The following year he was besieged in the castle of York by Edgar, the Saxon prince, and was only saved from surrender by the timely arrival of the Conqueror. In the same year he was attacked by the Danes, who captured the city of York with great slaughter and took William Malet, his wife and children, prisoners, but their lives were spared, as was that of Gilbert de Gand, for the sake of their ransoms. There is evidence that he was slain in this year, but it is uncertain and the date of his death is unknown. An entry in Domesday that "William Malet was seized of this place (Cidestan, Co. Suffolk), where he proceeded on the King's service where he died," would indicate that his death occurred during the compilation of that book. He was witness to a charter of King William to the church of St. Martin-le-Grand, in London, and is there styled "princeps," which title, however, was honorary and not hereditary, having ceased with his death."

------------------------------------------

    William Malet, or Guillaume, as he may have been called, "Sire de Graville", came from Graville Sainte Honorine between Le Havre and Harfleur, in what is today the French province of Normandy. He is said to have had a Norman father and a Saxon (read English) mother, and had some sort of association with King Harold of England before the conquest. William, through his Saxon mother, may actually have been related to King Harold, and also to the well known Lady Godiva. It is also possible that William and Harold were both God fathers of Duke William of Normandy's daughter, Abela.

# Note:

    The Malet Castle at Graville Sainte Honorine had an important strategic location, at the mouth of the Seine. It has now fallen into the sea, though some remnants of it may still be visible. A large section of wall with large iron rings attached was still there just over 100 years ago. The Abbey church, in which some of the Malets are buried, is now in the town of Le Havre. Though William Malet had connections to both sides in the conflict to come, his main allegiance was to Duke William of Normandy.

# Note:

William fought with distinction at Hastings, as the following Excerpt from Wace's "Roman de Rou" attests:

# Note:

William whom they call Mallet,
Boldly throws himself among them;
With his flashing sword
Against the English he makes furious onset;
But his shield they clove,
And his horse beneath him killed,
And himself they would have slain,
When came the Sire de Montfort
And Lord William de Vez-Pont
With the great force which they had,
Him they bravely rescued.
There many of their men they lost;
Mallet they remounted on the field
On a fresh war-horse.

# Note:

    When the battle was over, Duke William entrusted William Malet to attend to the burial of the dead English king. The body was buried under a heap of stones on top of a cliff at Hastings overlooking the shore that Harold had so bravely defended. William placed a stone on the grave with the epitaph:

"By command of the Duke, you rest here a King, O Harold, that you may be guardian still of the shore and sea".

This burial of Harold was only temporary and the body was later re-buried at Harold's Abbey at Waltham.

# Note:

    William and his brother Durand held lands in Lincolnshire, England, during the reign of Edward the Confessor, and through the reign of Harold right up to the conquest, in addition to those in Normandy. These Lincolnshire holdings, all in the Danelaw, probably came from William and Durand's mother. After the conquest William's English holdings were greatly increased, again, principally in the Danelaw, as English lands were taken from their Saxon owners and handed over to Norman Barons. It is likely that Duke William conferred these estates on William, partly because of his loyalty and skill in battle, but also because of his prior connections with his Danish "cousins" there. Perhaps the Duke felt that William was the best man to bring these proud, warlike and independent settlers under the control of their new King.

# Note:

    William was dead at the time of the Domesday survey in 1086, but the holdings at that time of his son Robert, and of his wife, give a good indication of the extent of his estates. He held large parts of what are today Suffolk and Norfolk, with smaller amounts of land in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire. Eye, in Suffolk appears to have been William's stronghold. Here he built a Motte and Bailey castle, after the Norman fashion. Nothing remains of the Norman fortifications, but the outline of the baileys and "Castle Mound", are still evident. There is even a slight indication of where the Market, founded by William Malet under Royal License would have been held.

# Note:

    William married Hesilia Crispin, by whom he had two sons, Robert and Gilbert, and one daughter, Beatrice. Robert and possibly Gilbert, along with their uncle Durand, accompanied their father at the battle of Hastings. The arms shown at the top of the page, likely carried by the Malets at Hastings, were used by many generations of the Malet family, both in England and in France, and can be seen on the Bayeux tapestry.

# Note:

    William was made Sheriff of York and granted considerable lands in Yorkshire following the building of the first Norman castle there (the mound now supports 'Clifford's Tower') in 1068. He and his fellow captains, Robert Fitz-Richard and William of Ghent, with 500 picked knights had to fight off a local revolt, headed by Edgar the Atheling; this in or shortly after January 1069. Robert Fitz-Richard and many of his men were killed and it was only by the timely arrival of King William that the City was saved. The natives remained restless and had another, token go, as soon as King William left but were quickly put down. The troops were strengthened and another castle built on the other side of the river from the original but, notwithstanding, in September 1069, William, his wife and two of his children were captured by a combined force of Danes and English under Sweyn of Denmark supported by Earls Waltheof and Gospatric and the Northumbrians, when York fell to them after a terrible fight. This led to King William ordering the burning and killing of everything in the north and Domesday, even 16 years later, records most of northern England as still being waste and uninhabited.

# Note:

    William, his wife and two children must have been released some time later and William retained most of his lands apart from those in Yorkshire, which will have come with the office of Sheriff, which had been taken from him. At some point the King awarded William the appellation of "Princep", and in the Chart granted by the King to the church of St. Martin le Grand, his signature appears as "Wilielmus Malet Princep". In the context of the times, Princep would likely have been interpreted as "leader, or chief". William is believed to have died fighting "Hereward the Wake" in the Fens near Ely Cathedral, which lies between South Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire and Norfolk (and in the middle of the Malet holdings), in 1071. The Domesday book records that "...He went into the marsh", and that "...he went on the King's service, where he died".

# Note:

    William is generally accepted to be the progenitor of many of the various branches of the Malet family (those that can trace their lines back that far), both in England and in France. The descendants of Durand continued to hold lands in Lincolnshire, and are recorded in Irby on Humber up to the 16th century.

-----------------------------------------

# Note: NORMAN SHERIFFS

    By 1066, when William the Conqueror seized power, he replaced all of the existing sheriffs with his own loyal comrades in arms. When William conveyed the offices of sheriff to his Normans, he also bestowed to them the title "Vicomte," which added nobility to their positions. He allowed Vicomte sheriffs to build castles, a powerful symbol of privilege and a far greater honor than had ever been granted to prior Anglo-Saxon sheriffs. The castles were a sign of aggressive force. This fortification symbolism helped identify William as the incomparable authority in the newly conquered land.

# Note:

    The most famous William the Conqueror sheriff was a man named William Malet, a ferocious warrior. During the Battle of Hasting his horse was killed from under him. Mounting a fresh horse, he continued leading the charge, killing the enemy along the way, to a Norman victory. William continued to use Malet to crush insurgent forces within his reign.. . . As a reward, William named Malet the sheriff of Yorkshire.

# Note:

    King William sought aggressive types for the office of sheriff whose ambitions were consistent with his. Those willing to squeeze the peasants to their maximum were the best qualified in William's eyes. He instituted the practice of selling the office to the highest bidder. This brought forth evil men willing to pay exorbitant prices for the office and then willing to do whatever it took to recoup their investment. . . No one spoke out for the peasantry because their only representative to the king was the very sheriffs embezzling them. The most notorious was Picot, Sheriff of Cambridgeshire. . . . Monks describe him as:

# Note:

a hungry lion, a prowling wolf, a crafty fox, a filthy swine, a dog without shame, who stuffed his belly like an insatiable beast as though the whole country were a single corpse.

# Note:

    If events reduced production within the shires and thereby reduced the prosperity of King William, the sheriff was then forced to press the peasants even more to make up for the deficiency. In 1083, William levied the highest tax assessment of his reign to make up for the previous year's famine and low production. . . . To enhance their income, sheriffs commonly pillaged Church properties. . . .

# Note:

    The only coin in circulation in twelfth century England was the silver penny. It was the responsibility of the sheriff to police the silver content in the coinage. If the sheriff failed to see that the tender did not meet quality assurance in the amount of silver content versus the alloy percentage, he was held personally liable for the shortage. Because this burden was placed on the sheriffs in the area that effected them the most, their pocketbooks. . . .Enforcement of the matter was particularly unkind under the reign of King Henry II to punish offenders that circulated "bastard" coins. The first offense routinely resulted in the severing of a hand or castration. . . .

# Note::

    The coming of King John in 1199 brought about one of the most stirring periods in the history of the medieval sheriff. . . . As King John waged war against the Welsh, the French, and the Irish, he placed the emphasis upon the sheriffs to finance his wars. . . . Because of the sheriff's authority and ability to raise funds, the 13th century saw the sheriff as the most powerful administrative force in medieval England. . . .

# Note:

    King John personally knew every one of the 100 or so sheriffs that he appointed between 1199 and 1216. Some were his intimate friends and most trusted advisors. In contrast to the prior practice of King Richard, he appointed only two members of the Church to the post. He instead chose to select intense, secular men, with strong military backgrounds. . . . His deliberate selection of men of harsh demeanor . . . was considered by people of his time as a substantive answer for the difficult issues of the day . . . tough men for tough times.

# Note:

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 234a-25

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 1830

Title: Butler Family History, 7th Edition 1991, by Lord Dunboyne, Kilkenny Castle Book Shop
1025 Hesilia Crispin 1057 Gilbert Malet 1050 Walter de Caen Notes under Reginald de Peyton son of Walter:

The first of the family on record by the name of Peyton was Reginald de Peyton, second son of Walter, Lord of Sibton, younger brother of Mallet, sheriff of Yorkshire. This Reginald held the lordships of Peyton Hall, in Ramshold, and Boxford, in Suffolk, of Hugh de Bigod; he was stewerd to Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, and gave lands to the monks of Thetford, to pray for the soul of Hugh Bigod. He had two sons, William, who held certain lands in Boxford, of the fee of the abbey of St. Edmundsbury, as appears by charter of his nephew John, and John de Peyton. [John Burke & John Bernard Burke, Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England, Ireland, and Scotland, Second Edition, Scott, Webster, & Geary, London, 1841, p. 408,Peyton, of Isleham]

The Domesday book states that Walter de Caen was Lord of Sibton, given to him by Robert Malet's mother (William Malet's widow).

The giving of Sibton to Walter de Caen by William Malet's widow implies some relationship, possibly brother (but most likeley bastard son--see below). See Domesday Book for history of Sibton.

----------------------------------------

The following quotation from the "Butler Family History" indicates that Walter is son of William Malet, which would explain the age difference between Walter & William (ie. they weren't brothers as
indicated above.}:

Theobald Blake Butler, a leading authority on the history of the family, who died only this year [1965] and whose works are now available to scholars in the National Library, Dublin, the British Museum and the Irish Genealogical Research Society, laboriously traced back to Domesday the lands which this family subsequently held in East Anglia and Lancashire and discovered that at least nine of the sixteen or more holdings which our Hervey was believed to have owned in Norfolk and Suffolk were entered in Domesday Book under the ownership of Walter de Caen. The discovery led him to surmise that the paternal ancestor of the Butlers was Walter de Caen (son of William Malet who accompanied the Conqueror and, being half Saxon, was entrusted with the burial of King Harold after the Battle of Hastings).

----------------------------------------

Based on the "Butler Family History" and the approximate birth dates, I am making Walter de Caen son of William Malet. I think, however, that the name may imply an illegitmate birth (or he was simply born in Caen), so he may not be the son of  Walter's wife, even though her giving him Sibton would imply blood relationship. Perhap he was son of her, but not William Malet?

The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968

The Domesday Book, England's Heritage, Then and Now, by Ed Thomas Hinde, London 1985

Butler Family History, 7th Edition 1991, by Lord Dunboyne, Kilkenny Castle Book Shop Page: 5

Change Date: 25 APR 2007
1048 Alvarissa Malet 1003 Malet 1005 1765 - 1836 John Payne 71 71 1738 - 1797 Anne Watts 59 59 Title: Will of Edward Watts of Russell Parish Bedford Co Va Bedford Co Will book 2 page 158-160
Author: Ellsbery,Elizabeth Prather
Publication: 440 Vine St Chillicothe,Mo 1962
Repository:
Call Number: 
1393 - 1463 Margaret De Neville 70 70 1113 Hugh de Vernon 1024 - 1090 Richard de Tonbridge FitzGilbert de Clare 66 66 # Note:

    The eldest son of Gislebert, was the founder of the House of Clare. He accompanied his kinsman, William the Conqueror, into England and participated in the spoils of conquest. He became possessed of 38 lordships in Surrey, 35 in Essex, 3 in Cambridgeshire, 95 in Suffolk, and some in Wiltshire and Devonshire. One was the manor of Westley in Suffolk (Manors of Suffolk, pages 112-113) and another was that of Clare, on the borders and in the county of Suffolk, which subsequently became his chief seat and his descendants were known as the Earls of Clare although never so created. The manor of Westley descended to Gilbert de Clare, his grandson (son of Gilbert de Clare, No. 12a), who was created by King Stephen, in 1138, Earl of Pembroke, and who married Elizabeth, sister of Waleran, Earl of Muellent, and on his death in 1149. The Earldom of Clare was created in 1138, i.e., in the reign of King Stephen, 1135-1154.

    Clare is a small village in the County of Suffolk. Richard was the son of Gilbert of Tunbridge, and being the eldest son assumed the surname of Clare, Richard's second brother, nicknamed "Strongbow", being created Earl of Pembroke in the third year of King Stephen; he was sealed chevronally; the chevron on a shield is probably the earliest known representation on an English shield. Gilbert de Clare was killed at Bannockburn in 1314, and as some members of his family were in residence at Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, and he himself having expressed a wish to be buried there, he was interred in the Abbey, where his memorial may still be seen.

    Richard FitzGilbert, having accompanied the Conqueror into England, participated in the spoils of conquest and obtained extensive possessions in the new and old dominions of his royal leader and kinsman. In 10873 we find him joined under the designation of Ricardus de Benefacta, with William de Warren, in the great office of Justiciary of England, with whom, in three years afterwards, he was in arms against the rebellious lords Robert de Britolio, Earl of Hereford, and Ralph Waher, or Guarder, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, and behaved with great gallantry. But afterwards, at the time of the General Survey, which was towards the close of William's reign, he is called Ricardus de Tonebruge, from his seat at Tonebruge (now Tunbridge) in Kent, which town and castle he obtained from the archbishop of Canterbury in lieu of the castle of Brion, at which time he enjoyed thirty-eight lordships in Surrey, thirty-five in Essex, three in Cambridgeshire, with some others in Wilts and Devon, and ninety-five in Suffolk, amongst those was Clare, whence he was occasionally styled Richard de Clare, and that place in a few years afterwards becoming the chief seat of the family, his descendants are said to have assumed thereupon the title of Earls of Clare. This great feudal lord m. Rohese, dau. of Walter Giffard, Earl of Buckingham, and had issue, Gilbert, his successor, Roger, Walter, Richard, Robert, a dau. m. to Ralph de Telgers, and a dau. mo. to Eudo Dapifer. Richard de Tonebruge, or de Clare, whose is said to have fallen in a skirmish with the Welsh, was s. by his eldest son, Gilbert de Tonebruge. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 118, Clare, Lords of Clare, Earls of Hertford, Earls of Gloucester]

[Pullen010502.FTW]

Subject: Re: Richard DE CLARE
From: Gordon Fisher <gfisher@SHENTEL.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Nov 1996 11:25:00 -0500
Message-Idaho: <199611291625.LAA25611@head.globalcom.net>

Gordon Fisher gfisher@shentel.net

Descendants of Richard FITZRICHARD DE CLARE - 29 Nov 1996
-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----
-

FIRST GENERATION

1. Richard FITZRICHARD DE CLARE died before 1090.

Richard FITZRICHARD DE CLARE and Rohese\Rohais GIFFARD had the following
children:

+2 i. Gilbert FITZRICHARD DE CLARE Lord.
+3 ii. ADELIZA DE CLARE.


SECOND GENERATION

2. Gilbert FITZRICHARD DE CLARE Lord was born before 1066. He died in 1114
in or
1117.

Gilbert FITZRICHARD DE CLARE Lord and Adeliza de CLERMONT had the following
children:

+4 i. Gilbert (1) de CLARE.
+5 ii. Richard (2) FITZGILBERT DE CLARE.

3. ADELIZA DE CLARE.


THIRD GENERATION

4. Gilbert (1) de CLARE died in 1147/48.

Elizabeth (Isabel) de BEAUMONT (daughter of Robert (1) de BEAUMONT 1st Earl
Leicester and ISABEL OF VERMANDOIS) was born after 1101. Gilbert (1) de
CLARE and
Elizabeth (Isabel) de BEAUMONT had the following children:

+6 i. Richard (1) de CLARE Strongbow.

5. Richard (2) FITZGILBERT DE CLARE died on 15 Apr 1136. He was buried in
Gloucester, England.

Richard (2) FITZGILBERT DE CLARE and Adeliz (w of R FitzGilbert) --- had
the
following children:

+7 i. Isabel de CONDET.
+8 ii. Roger de CLARE.


FOURTH GENERATION

6. Richard (1) de CLARE Strongbow was born about 1130. He died about 20 Apr
1176.

Aoife (Eve) MACMURCHADA died in living 1186. Richard (1) de CLARE Strongbow
and
Aoife (Eve) MACMURCHADA had the following children:

+9 i. Isabel de CLARE.

7. Isabel de CONDET died in living 1166.

Hugh BARDOLF died about 1176. Isabel de CONDET and Hugh BARDOLF had the
following children:

+10 i. Juliana BARDOLF.

8. Roger de CLARE died in 1173.

Roger de CLARE and Maude ST. HILARY had the following children:

+11 i. Aveline de CLARE.
+12 ii. Richard (2) de CLARE 6th Earl of Clare, etc.


FIFTH GENERATION

9. Isabel de CLARE died in 1220.

William MARSHAL Sir (son of John MARSHAL and Sybil de SALISBURY) was born
about
1146. He died on 14 May 1219 in Caversham, England. He was buried in Temple
Church, London, England. Isabel de CLARE and William MARSHAL Sir had the
following children:

+13 i. EVA MARSHAL.
+14 ii. Isabel MARSHAL.

10. Juliana BARDOLF died before 1220.

Nicholas (1) de POYNTZ died before 2 Nov 1223. Juliana BARDOLF and Nicholas
(1) de
POYNTZ had the following children:

+15 i. Hugh (1) de POYNTZ.

11. Aveline de CLARE died before 1225.

Geoffrey FITZPETER Earl of Essex died on 14 Oct 1213. He was buried in




Shouldam
Priory. Aveline de CLARE and Geoffrey FITZPETER Earl of Essex had the
following
children:

+16 i. Hawise FITZPETER.

12. Richard (2) de CLARE 6th Earl of Clare, etc died about 28 Nov 1217.

(d of Wm FitzRobert) AMICE Countess of Gloucester (daughter of William
FITZROBERT 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Hawise de BEAUMONT) died on 1 Jan




1224/25.
Richard (2) de CLARE 6th Earl of Clare, etc and (d of Wm FitzRobert) AMICE
Countess
of Gloucester had the following children:

+17 i. Gilbert (2) de CLARE 7th Earl of Clare, etc.

Descendants of Richard FITZRICHARD DE CLARE - 29 Nov 1996 -- >>

>From "A Baronial Family In Medieval England: The Clares, 1217-1314", by Michael Altschul, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore 1965

Part II--Just to keep the players straight:

Richard I, duke of Normandy d. 996
:
Godfrey of Brionne and Eu d. ca 1015
:
Gilbert, count of Brionne d. 1040
:
-Richard fitz Gilbert (1035-1090)=Rohese de Giffard
:
Roger d.s.p. 1130
Gilbert fitz Richard I(ca1066-1117)=Adeliz d/o Hugh Claremont
Walter d.s.p. 1138
Richard abbot of Ely 1100
Robert d. 1136
Adelize=Walter Tirel
Rohese=Eudo Dapifer

-Baldwin fitz Gilbert d. 1095
:
William d.s.p. 1096
Robert d.s.p. 1101
Richard d.s.p. 1137
-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----


---------------------------------------------
Richard de CLARE, earl of Hertford d. 1217
Richard/Roger d.s.p. 1228
Matilda= (1) William de Braose
(2) ?? 1219 Rhys Gryg d.1233
Gilbert de CLARE (1180-1230) = 1214 Isabel =1231 Richard of Cornwall d.
1272
William( 1228-d.s.p. 1258)
Gilbert b. 1229
Amicia (1220-1283) = (1) 1226 Baldwin de Reviers
(2) 1247 Robert de Guines d.
1283
Isabel b. 1226 = 1240 Robert Bruce d. 1295
Richard de CLARE (1222-1262) = (1) Margaret de Burgh d. 1237
(2) Maud de Lacy d. 1289
Thomas (124?-1287) = Juliana of Offaly d. 1300
Bogo (1248-d.s.p. 1294)
Isabel (1240-1271) = 1258 William, marquis de Montferrat
Margaret (1249-1312) = 1272 Edmund of Cornwall d. 1300
Rohese (1252-1299+) = 1270 Roger de Mowbray d. 1297
Eglentina (1257-1257)
Gilbert de CLARE (1243-1295) = 1254 (1) Alice de Lusignan
(annulled 1285)
Joan (1264/71-1322+ = 1284 Duncan d. 1288
1302
Gervase Avenel d. 1322+
Isabella (1263-1358) = 1316 Maurice de Berkley

1290 (2)
Joan of Acre d 1307
Eleanor (1292-1337)=(1) 1306 Hugh Despenser




d.1326
(2) 1327




William la Zouche d. 1337
Margaret (1293-1342)= (1) 1307 Peter Gaveston
d.s.p. 1312
(2) 1317
Hugh D'Audley d. 1347
Elizabeth (1295-1360)= (1) 1308 John de Burgh d.
1313
(2) 1316
Theobald Verdun d.s.p. 1316
(3) 1317
Roger Damory d.s.p. 1322

Michael Altschul, *A Baronial Family in Medieval England: The Clares, 1217-1314*, Baltimore Maryland (Johns Hopkins Press) 1965, p 41-42:

"Taken as a whole, the Clare family represents what might be termed one of the most successful joint enterprises in medieval English history. More than two centuries of steady territorial growth raised the family to a position of pre-eminence in the ranks of the higher nobility. The major factors in this development in the twelfth century were undoubtedly royal favor and shrewdly chosen marriages. The Clares prospered from their intimate connections with successive rulers of England, and the male members of the house were rewarded with a series of important fiefs and well-placed ladies. The power and prestige of the family reached their highest level in the thirteenth century and the fortunes of its members help illuminate almost every aspect of the social and political life of the English baronage in this period."

Clare (family), family of English nobles prominent in the 12th and 13th centuries. The 1st earl of Clare, the founder of the family, was Richard Fitz-Gilbert (flourished 1070-1091?), a knight who accompanied William the Conqueror (King William I of England) on the Norman invasion of England in 1066. He received extensive lands in Suffolk County, and in the village of Clare he built a castle, the ruins of which still exist. His great-grandson, Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, known as Strongbow, laid the foundations for English rule in Ireland (see Pembroke, Richard de Clare, 2nd earl of). Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Clare (died 1217), and his son Gilbert de Clare, 7th earl of Clare (flourished 1215-1230), were leaders of the barons who forced King John to sign the Magna Carta in 1215.

© 1993-2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.



Sources:

   1. Abbrev: Garner, Lorraine Ann "Lori"
      Title: Garner, Lorraine Ann "Lori" (P.O. Box 577, Bayview, Idaho 83803)
      Note:
      Call number:

      Her sources included, but may not be limited to: Burke's Landed Gentry, Burke's Dormant & Extinct Peerage, Burke's Peerage of American Presidents, Debrett's Peerage, Oxford histories & "numerous othe r reference works"

      very good to excellent, although she has a tendency to follow Burke's

      Hardcopy notes of Lori Garner Elmore.
   2. Abbrev: Magna Charta Sureties, 1215
      Title: Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 (4th ed, Genealogical Publishing, Baltimore)ublishing, Baltimore.
      Note:
      Call number:

      J.H. Garner
      Page: line 157 p 158
      Text: s of Gilbert, Count of Brionne, no mother
   3. Abbrev: Pullen010502.FTW
      Title: Pullen010502.FTW
      Note:
      Call number:
      Text: Date of Import: Jan 5, 2002

1062 - 1129 William Tankerville 67 67 1034 Ralph de Tankerville 1437 - 1498 John Scrope 61 61 5th Baron Scrope of Bolton

---

JOHN (LE SCROPE), LORD SCROPE (of Bolton), 1st son and heir (a), born 22 July 1437 or 1438. The escheators in cos. Leicester and York were ordered to cause him to have full seisin of his father's lands, 5 May 1459. He was summoned to Parliament from 30 July 1460 16 January 1496/7; knighted before 23 August 1460, when he was on the Commission of the Peace, co. York, North Riding. A Yorkist, he was with Warwick at the battle of Northampton, 10 July 1460; present in London when Thomas Bourchier, Archbishop of Canterbury, surrendered the Great Seal, 25 July 1460; 'sore hurt' at the battle of Towton, 29 March 1461; present at the battle of Hexham, 15 May 1462; attended Edward IV on his journey to Scotland, December 1464; nominated K.G. before 22 April 1463; Captain of Newcastle, winter 1463-64. He headed a rising in Richmondshire, but submitted to Edward at York, 22 March 1469/70; in charge of the East coast before Edward's landing, 14 March 1470. He was a Commissioner to negotiate a marriage between the Lady Cecily, youngest daughter of Edward IV, and James, the infant son of James III [SCT], 29 July 1474, and stood proxy for her at her betrothal, Edinburgh, 26 October following; took part in the King's invasion of France with 20 men-at-arms and 200 archers, 1475; was on a mission to Rome with Earl Rivers, 1476; Commissioner of Oyer and Terminer, Middlesex 12 May 1477 and co. York, 5 May 1481/2; Commissioner of Array, co. York, North Riding, 20 June 1480. With Northumberland he led the van of the English army invading Scotland, July 1482; Commissioner to treat with the Ambassadors of Alexander (Stewart), Duke of Albany [SCT], 12 January 1482/3. He attended the Coronation of Richard III, 6 July 1483; Commissioner to assess and collect certain subsidies, co. York, 1 August 1483; Commissioner of Array to resist the rebels, Devonand Cornwall, 13 November 1483; co. York, North Riding, 8 December 1484; on the Commission of the Peace, Cornwall, 30 December 1483; Devon and Somerset, 5 December 1484. For his good serviccs against the rcbels Richard III granted him and the heirs male of his body certain manors and lands in Devon and Cornwall, 5 December, and appointed him Constable of Exeter Castle for life, 6 December 1484. After the accession of Henry VII he was present at the banquet of the Order of the Garter at York, 22 April 1486, but he supported Lambert Simnel and, with Thomas, Lord Scrope (of Masham), made an unsuccessful attack on Bootharn Bar, York, June 1487. He had a general pardon February 1487/8. He fought against the Scots and assisted in raising the siege of Norham Castle, August 1497.

He married, 1stly (dispensation 22 November 1447, they being related in the 4th degree), Joan, daughter of William(FITZHUGH), 4th LORD FITZHUGH, by Margery, daughter of Sir William (DE WILLOUGHBY), LORD WILLOUGHBY. She, who, as well asher husband, was admitted to the Gild of Corpus Christi, York, 1462-63, died before 1470. He married, 2ndly, before 10 December 1471, Elizabeth, widow of William (LA ZOUCHE), 5th LORD ZOUCHE (of Haryngworth) (died 25 December 1462), daughter of Sir Oliver ST. JOHN, by Margaret, only daughter and eventually heir of Sir John BEAUCHAMP, of Bletsoe, Beds. She was living in 1489 and died before 3 July 1494. He married, 3rdly, after 9 February 1490/1, Anne, widow of (i) Sir William CHAMBERLAINE, K.G. (diedMarch or April 1462), and (ii) Sir Robert WINGFIELD, M.P.,Controller of the Household (died shortly before 13 November 1481), daughter and heir of Sir Robert HARLING, of East Harling, Norfolk, by Jane, daughter and heir of Edmund GUNVILLE. He died 17 August 1498 [a2]. His widow, by whom he had no issue, died 18 September 1498. [Complete Peerage XI:544-6, XIV:573-4,(transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(a) He had 2 brothers, Sir Richard Scrope and Ralph Scope, Rector of Hambleden, Bucks, and Archdeacon of Northumberland, d. 2 Mar 1516.

[a2] He held a messuage or tenement in London lately called 'Sergiauntes Inn' opposite St. Andrew's, Holborn, of which he had been enfeoffed by Sir Guy Fairfax, Justice of the King's Bench, by charter, 8 February 1493/4. The 1st Lord's father had acquired a messuage in Holborn as early as 1344. The 5th Lord also held lands in Kent, Bucks, Beds, Leic, co. Cambridge, Rutland, York City, co. York, co. Lincoln and Notts.

Note: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/SCROPE.htm#John%20SCROPE%20(5ø%20B.%20Scrope%20of%20Bolton) for picture

Note: seriously wounded at the Battle of Towton. Henry VI is reputed to have come to Bolton after losing the Battle of Hexham. Scrope looked after him well for two days before he departed. Within 4 miles of Bolton the King was apprehended by the Earl of Warwick, who conveyed him to the Tower of London, where he was murdered, probably on the orders of Edward IV. Scrope subsequently supported the Earl of Warwick when he rebelled against Edward IV. Scrope was pardoned by Edward and was named as an executor, the Duke of Clarence, executed by being drowned in a butt of Malmsey wine. Scrope subsequently supported Richard III, closely related to both Catesby and Lovell, (The Rat and The Cat and Lovell his dog, rule all of England under The Hog) fighting at The Battle of Bosworth Field. Pardoned again by Henry VII, he then supported Lambert Simnel's Revolt. Thomas Lord Scrope of Masham, with John, Lord Scrope of Bolton besieged York, thinking that the citizens of York would support The Yorkist Pretender. They received no support and were defeated. Both were heavily fined. Scrope of Bolton was ordered to remain within 22 miles ofLondon 2

---

Sources:
Title: AFN:
Abbrev: AFN:
Title: Tudor Place
Abbrev: Tudor Place
Author: Jorge H. Castelli
Title: Horrocks, Philips, Winget, Keeler, Clark, Watson, Lockwood, Strong, Gates and ancestors
Abbrev: Horrocks, Philips, Winget, Keeler, Clark, Watson,
Author: Lloyd A. Horocks
Title: The Phillips, Weber, Kirk and Staggs Family
Abbrev: The Phillips, Weber, Kirk and Staggs Family
Author: Jim Weber
1035 - 1086 William d'Arques 51 51 # Note:

    William of Arques has been the subject of an exhaustive study by Professor D. C. Douglas in the introduction to his edition "The Domesday Monacharum of Christ Church Canterbury", where full references are given to the authorities; and it is unnecessary to go over the ground again. Briefly he held Folkestone, Kent, and was the son of Godfrey Vicomte of Arques. The identity of the tenant of Folkstone is established by the fact that it passed to Nigel de Monville who had married his daughter and coheiress Emma. He must not be confused with William of Arques, a monk of Moleme who was a counsellor of Robert Curthose, and still less with William, count of Arques, the uncle of William the Conqueror. The ruined castle of Arques-la-Bataille is well known.

1045 - 1106 Robert Malet 61 61 Robert Malet (d. 1106?) was an English baron and a close advisor of Henry I. He was the son of William Malet, and inherited his father's great honor of Eye in 1071. This made him one of the dozen or so greatest landholders in England. According to the Domesday Book he held 221 manors in Suffolk, 32 in Yorkshire, 8 in Lincolnshire, 3 in Essex, 2 in Nottinghamshire, and 1 in Hampshire. He also inherited the family property in Normandy.

In 1075 Malet was sheriff of Suffolk, and helped suppress the rebellion of Ralph Wader. Afterwards, he appeared frequently at King William I's court. All changed with the accession of William II. By 1094 Malet's English lands had been taken away from him. The reasons are unknown, and no more is known of Malet's activities during William II's reign. Most likely he was in Normandy, and it may be that his falling out with William II was due to his preference for Duke Robert of Normandy in the rivalry between the two brothers.

Malet suddenly reappears three days after the death of William II in 1100, as a witness to Henry I's coronation charter. He must have been with Henry at the time of William's death, or rushed from Normandy when the word came. In any case, Malet soon regained his office as sheriff of Suffolk, and his honor of Eye. He was a close councilor of the king, and was appointed master chamberlain (probably the first to hold that office).

It used to be thought that Malet had some quarrel with the king, and again lost his lands, on the basis of some statements by Orderic Vitalis, but most historians now think Orderic confused Malet with his successor William. Instead it appears he remained in the king's confidence and held his lands until his death. He may have died at the battle of Tinchebrai, though no specific evidence supports this; he may in fact have lived on through 1107.
References
C. Warren Hollister, "Henry I and Robert Malet", Viator, Vol. 4, 1973, pp. 115-32
Cyril Hurt, "William Malet and His Family", Anglo-Norman Studies XIX
C. P. Lewis, "The King and Eye: A Study in Anglo-Norman Politics", English Historical Review, vol. 104, 1989, pp. 569-87

1302 - 1366 William de la Pole 64 64 1306 - 1380 Katherine de Norwich 74 74 1275 - 1328 William ap Gruffydd de la Pole 53 53 1287 Elena Rotenhering 1300 John de la Pole 1295 Richard de la Pole 1258 - 1309 Owain ap Gryffud de la Pole 51 51 1261 - 1293 Joan Corbet 32 32 1215 - 1286 Gruffud ap Gwenwynwyn 71 71 son of Gwenwynwyn ap Owain and Margaret Corbet
Griffith, elder son, Prince of Powys and Wenwynwyn. He married Hawys, daughter of John le Strange, feudal Lord of Knockyn and Cheswardine, and by her, who had a royal grant of the Manor of Strettondale, he had 6 sons and 1 daughter.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 310)Griffith, elder son, Prince of Powys and Wenwynwyn. He married Hawys, daughter of John le Strange, feudal Lord of Knockyn and Cheswardine, and by her, who had a royal grant of the Manor of Strettondale, he had 6 sons and 1 daughter.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 310)

Griffith ap Gwenwynwyn, Prince of Powis. On July 15, 1223, Ranulph, Earl of Chester, was ordered to see that the constable of Bridgenorth, Shropshire do send the sons of Gwenwynwyn to Gloucester; and in the 19th, the King being at Gloucester, the Earl certifies their arrival. Griffiths country was taken by Llewellyn, Prince of North Wales, as a penalty of disaffection. Later he joined Llewellyn, and then changed again to Edward I, whom Llewellyn complained had received and protected his rebel subject Griffith ap Gwenwynwyn. Griffith married Hawyse, daughter of John le Strange, feudal lord of Knockyn and Cheswardine, and by her had a royal grant of the Manor of Strettondale, and the wardship of the lands in capite of her grandson Griffin de la Pole. They had six sons: Owen (who received the Castle of Powis from his father in 1277, and who resigned his title as Prince of Powis, and became a baron of Powis when Edward I overcame the Welsh). Llewellyn, John, William, Griffith and David, and a daughter, Margaret.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 361)

Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn also known as Griffith de la Pole (died c. 1287) was a Welsh prince who was lord of the part of Powys known as Powys Wenwynwyn.
Gruffydd was the son of Gwenwynwyn ab Owain and Margaret Corbet. He was still a child when his father, who had been driven out of his princedom by Llywelyn the Great, died in exile in 1216. He spent his youth in England, maintained by the king, and did not return to Wales until after Llywelyn's death. When Dafydd ap Llywelyn was forced to come to terms with King Henry III of England in 1241, Gruffydd was given most of the lands formerly held by his father, paying homage to Henry for them. Around this time he married Hawise, daughter of John Lestrange of Knockin.
When Llywelyn the Last increased his power in Wales after 1255, Gruffydd continued to support the crown, and in 1257 he was again driven into exile. In 1263 he agreed to transfer his allegiance to Llywelyn under threat of being stripped of his lands, and this was confirmed at the Treaty of Montgomery in 1267. In 1274 Gruffydd, his wife Hawise and his son Owain were all involved with Llywelyn's brother Dafydd ap Gruffydd in a plot to assassinate Llywelyn. Dafydd was with Llywelyn at the time, and it was arranged that Owain would come with armed men on February 2 to carry out the assassination; however he was prevented by a snowstorm. Llywelyn did not discover the full details of the plot until later that year, when Owain confessed to the Bishop of Bangor. He said that the intention had been to make Dafydd prince of Gwynedd, and that Dafydd would then reward Gruffydd with lands. When Llywelyn discovered the details of the plot he sent envoys to Welshpool to summon Gruffydd to appear before him, but Gruffydd fled to England. He settled in Shrewsbury and used it as a base for raids on Llywelyn's lands, probably encouraged by the king. After the war of 1277, when Llywelyn was forced to cede his lands outside Gwynedd, Gruffydd was again given his lands back. He became embroiled in an increasingly bitter dispute with Llywelyn over lands in Arwystli. Llywelyn wanted the issue resolved by Welsh law while Gruffydd wanted English law used and was supported by King Edward I of England.
Gruffydd supported King Edward in the final war of 1282, and there have been suggestions that he may have been involved in the killing of Llywelyn at Cilmeri in December that year. He died some time between February 1286 and the end of 1287, and was succeeded by his eldest son Owain, also known as Owen de la Pole.
(Wikipedia)

Griffith ap Wenwynwyn, afterwards known as Griffith de la Pole, had succeeded his father as a minor about 1218 in the principality of Upper Powys, which lay round the head waters of the Severn, to the south-east of Llewelyn's country of Snowdon, affording, therefore, convenient access for attacking the latter territory; it was, moreover, immediately contiguous to the great fief of fitz Alan, and to le Strange's own castle of Knockin. Griffith did not come into possession of his principality until 1241, when he did homage for it to Henry III; next year he married Hawyse, daughter of John le Strange, and had a special grant allowing him to assign her dowry in his Derbyshire manor of Ashford, under conditions which showed the great favour of the King to the family of le Strange, and the importance attached by him to this marriage; the dowry was assured to Hawyse for life if she survived her husband, even if Griffith should abandon [as at one time he did] the service and fealty of the King.
The year 1283 is generally given as the date of his death, but Professor Tout has shown that he was alive on February 27, 1286, as is shown by a deed of his dated at Bottington on Ash Wednesday, 14 Edw. I.
(Le Strange Records, page 114, 163)
1229 - 1310 Hawise le Strange 81 81 1188 Margaret Corbet 1165 - 1219 Gwenwynwyn ap Owain 54 54 Gwenwynwyn, who is so finely portrayed by Sir Walter Scott in his "Betrothed." He married Margaret, daughter of Robert Corbet, feudal baron of Caus. They resumed the arms of his line: Or a lion rampant gules. In 2nd of Henry III, 1218, he appears to have been dead, his widow Margaret living and his heirs under age.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 310)

Gwenwynwyn, an only child, Prince of Powis Cyffeillog. The castle of Powis, which was begun by Bleddyn, was continued by Gwenwynwyn, and on completion appeared as a low-roofed edifice of red stone. The castle was captured by the English in 1191, but retaken by Gwenwynwyn in 1197, it contains a vast store of art collections, paintings and statuary, including heroic busts of the twelve Caesors brought from Italy. This Prince, and the Castle of Powis so finely portrayed in the "Betrothed" by Sir Walter Scott, recovered his castle from Archbishop Hubert, who commanded the armies of Richard I against the Welsh. In 1198, ambitious of achieving the independence of his country, he raised a large army, and besieged William Braose in his castle of Payn in Radnor, but was defeated in a battle near the castle. In 1208 he was in arms with Llewellyn, Prince of North Wales, and with other great men of Wales and the two princes drove King John from the country. He later returned his allegiance to King John, and in 1210 Gwenwynwyn was pursued by Llewellyn and driven within the walls of Chester. He was dead by 1218, his widow Margaret living, and his children under age. He married Margaret, daughter of Robert Corbet, feudal baron of Caus. Griffith resumed the arms of his line: Or, a lion Rampant Gules. He had Madoc Goch and his elder son, Griffith.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 361)

Gwenwynwyn ab Owain (died c.1216) was the last major ruler of mid Wales before the completion of the English conquest. He was a grandson of Owain Gwynedd and ruled southern Powys from 1195, having taken control following the death of his father Owain Cyfeiliog.
His possession of Powys Wenwynwyn brought him into conflict with Llywelyn the Great, ruler of Gwynedd, who was keen to extend his own jurisdiction over the whole of Wales. King John favoured Gwenwynwyn until a marriage alliance was made between Llywelyn and John's illegitimate daughter. The two native princes then kept their distance until 1208. As a result of Gwenwynwyn's activities, John confiscated his lands and allowed Llywelyn to steal Ceredigion and Powys. Gwenwynwyn did not get his territory back for two years, but his resentment towards the English led him into an alliance with Llywelyn, which lasted from 1212 until 1216, when John restored some of Gwenwynwyn's property and the two princes fell out again. Llywelyn invaded Powys, and Gwenwynwyn is believed to have died or been killed that same year. He was survived by his son Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn whose actions in 1282 may have led directly to the death of Llywelyn the Great's grandson and the last native Prince of Wales, Llywelyn ap Gruffydd.
(Wikipedia)
1200 Bleddyn ap Cynfyn 1230 - 1300 Robert de Corbet 70 70 1215 - 1255 Richard de Corbet 40 40 1216 - 1272 Petronilla de Booley 56 56 1190 - 1235 Richard de Corbet 45 45 1195 - 1239 Joan de Morton- Toret 44 44 1161 - 1217 Richard de Corbet 56 56 1132 Thomas de Corbet 1237 Katherine le Strange 1280 - 1328 Walter de Norwich 48 48 1280 - 1343 Catherine Hedersett 63 63 1310 - 1375 Margaret Norwich 65 65 1255 Geoffrey de Norwich 1225 Walter de Norwich 1341 - 1372 Robert de Tibetot 31 31 1344 - 1380 Margaret Deincourt 36 36 1368 Elizabeth Tibetot 1313 - 1367 John de Tibetot 53 53 2nd Baron Tibetot 1320 - 1347 Margaret de Badlesmere 27 27 1285 Agnes De Ros 1279 - 1314 Pain de Tibetot 34 34 1st Baron Tibetot Auda Tibetot 1250 Eve de Chaworth D. 1298 Robert de Tibetot 1294 - 1364 William de Deincourt 70 70 1295 - 1379 Millicent la Zouche 84 84 1224 Agnes de Neville 1223 - 1257 John de Deincourt 34 34 1196 - 1246 Oliver de Deincourt 50 50 1162 - 1201 Oliver Deincourt 39 39 1145 - 1231 Nicola de la Haye 86 86 1135 John Deincourt 1140 Alice Murdach 1105 Walter Deincourt Maud 1075 Ralph Deincourt 1110 Ralph Murdach 1110 - 1170 Beatrice de Chesney 60 60 1073 - 1109 Roger de Chesney 36 36 1073 Alice de Langetot 1123 Hawise de Chesney 1043 Ralph de Langetot 1122 Maud de Vernon 1116 - 1156 Richard de la Haye 40 40 1144 Lucy de la Haye 1073 - 1135 Robert de la Haye 62 62 1085 Muriel of Lincoln Olivia d'Aubigny 1050 Ralph de la Haye 1055 Colswein of Lincoln 1067 Muriel de Montfort 1276 - 1351 William la Zouche 74 74 1280 - 1346 Maude Lovel 66 66 1260 Joan De Ros 1252 - 1310 John Lovel 58 58 1222 - 1287 John Lovel 65 65 Bristol for the King's ineffectual campaign against Llewelyn. He was one of the few Barons who supported the King before the outbreak of civil war, and in March 1264, after Henry's return from France, where Louis had made the unpopular Award of Amiens, as arbitrator between the Crown and the Barons, Lovel was entrusted with the castle of Northampton. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Lewes, 14 May 1264. In September 1265 before which time he had been knighted, he was made a commissioner to deal with lands of rebels in Northants. In the summer of 1270 he was raising money to accompany Prince Edward in the last Crusade. The service against Llewelyn for which he was summoned 1276-7 was performed by his son John, on
account of his illness; in 1282 the same service was done by two servientes. He married Maud DE SYDENHAM. He died in 1287. [CP 8:215]

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=stolp&id=I936
1230 Maud Sydenham 1185 - 1252 John Lovel 67 67 JOHN LOVEL, son and heir, a minor at his father's death, whose wardship was granted to Alan Basset. In 1216 his lands were forfeit, presumably for opposition with the other Barons to King John; and again in 1223, for refusal of the aid due from him in the Welsh war; but he accompanied the King in 1224 to the siege of Bedford Castle. He married, before August 1216, [----] daughter of Alan BASSET and Aline his wife. He died before 23 December 1252. [CP 8:214]

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=stolp&id=I923
1430 Thomas le Scrope 1375 Thomas Chaworth Nicola Braybrooke 1357 - 1399 William Chaworth 42 42 D. 1400 Alicia Caltoft D. 1373 Thomas Chaworth 1322 Joan de la Pole D. 1371 Thomas Chaworth 1312 Jane Luttrell 1306 Joan Chaworth D. 1390 Geoffrey Luttrell 1278 Constance le Scrope 1278 Constance le Scrope 1295 Richard de la Pole 1306 Joan Chaworth John Caltoft Catherine le Brett John le Brett Roger le Brett Jordan le Brett Joan Heriz William Heriz Maud Bassett 1240 John de Hedersett 1258 - 1336 Margaret verch Griffith 78 78 Llewellyn ap Griffith John ap Griffith William ap Griffith Griffith ap Griffith David ap Griffith 1125 - 1197 Owen ap Gruffydd 72 72 Prince of Higher Powys
Owen Cyfeilog, Prince of Higher Powys. He was a distinguished bard and among other productions is his Welch ode called Hirlas or the Blue Long Horn. He died in 1197, married Princess Gwenllian, daughter of Owen Gwynedd, Prince of North Wales.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 309-310)

Owen Cyfelliog, Prince of Powis Cyfelliog or Higher Powis, to which he succeeded on the demise of his grandfather, Meredith ap Bleddyn. In 1176 he attended the summons of Henry to a conference with him at Oxford on Welsh affairs. He was a poet and a Prince, a distinguished bard. In 1170 he founded the Cistercian Abbey of Strata Marcelle and died 1197, leaving by Princess Gwenllian, his consort, daughter of Owen Gynedd, Prince of North Wales.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 361)

Owain ap Gruffydd (c. 1130 - 1197) was a prince of the southern part of Powys and a poet. He is usually known as Owain Cyfeiliog to distinguish him from another contemporary ruler, Owain ap Gruffydd of Gwynedd known as Owain Gwynedd.
Owain was the son of Gruffydd ap Maredudd and nephew of Madog ap Maredudd, the last prince of the whole of Powys. Madog gave his nephew the commote of Cyfeiliog to rule in 1147. On Madog's death in 1160 Owain became the ruler of most of southern Powys.

He is recorded as having been in alliance with the other Welsh princes to withstand the invasion of 1165 by king Henry II of England. Thereafter he usually followed a policy of supporting the English crown. In 1170 he gave land for the founding of the abbey of Strata Marcella. In 1188 however he refused to meet or support Baldwin, Archbishop of Canterbury and Giraldus Cambrensis when they journeyed around Wales to raise men for a crusade, and was excommunicated as a result.
In 1195 Owain handed the rule of his realm to his son Gwenwynwyn ab Owain and retired to the abbey of Strata Marcella, where he died and was buried two years later.

Owain was also a notable poet. Although only one of his poems has been preserved, this one, Hirlas Owain is commonly rated as one of the finest Welsh poems of this period. In the poem, Owain's bodyguard are gathered at his court following a raid in 1155 to free his brother Meurig from prison in Maelor. The mission accomplished, Owain calls for the drinking horn to be passed to each member of his bodyguard in turn, with words of praise for each one. There is a more sombre note when he remembers two of his men who fell in the fighting and grieves for their loss.
Owain also appears in the romance of Fulke FitzWarin as a knight who strikes Fulk with a spear.
(Wikipedia)
Madoc Goch ap Gwenwynwyn 1125 - 1165 Gwenllian verch Owain 40 40 1105 Gwerful ferch Gwrgeneu 1090 - 1128 Gruffydd ap Maredydd 38 38 King Griffith ap Meredith, submitted with his father to Henry I. and was summoned by that monarch to his baronial parliaments. He bore for arms: Or a lion's gamb, erased in bend gu, and took active part in the feuds and warfare of that period, and died in the lifetime of his father in 1128, leaving by his wife Geverfyl an only child, Owen.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 309)
Meurig ap Gruffydd 1216 Constance de Powis 1217 Emma Corbet 1192 Roger Corbet 1163 Roger Corbet 1156 Alice Corbet 1167 Emma Corbet 1165 Julia Corbet 1116 - 1165 Simon Corbet 49 49 1133 William Corbet 1137 Walter Corbet 1141 Robert Corbet 1145 Rowley Corbet 1149 Richard Corbet 1151 Hugh Corbet 1159 Roger Corbet 1089 - 1136 William Corbet 47 47 1110 Roger Corbet 1112 William Corbet 1114 Walter Corbet 1118 Hugh Corbet 1120 Robert Corbet 1048 - 1133 Roger Corbet 85 85 1093 Simon Corbet 1020 - 1086 Hugo le Corbet 66 66 This family history begins with Hugo le Corbet or le Corbeau. With two of his sons, Roger and Robert, Sir Hugo joined in the battle of Hastings with William the Conqueror in 1066. Hugo helped counsel the Conqueror in regards to the Welsh border lands which were rebellious. For their service as knights to the Conqueror, Robert and Roger were given Baronies. Roger received twenty-five manors. Robert received a grant of fifteen manors in Shropshire which became the barony of Longden. These Manors were townships under the Saxon rule. Roger called both his castle and barony "Caus" after his home in Normandy. The Corbets served under the Earl Roger de Montgomery. They were in service to help control the borders of Wales. -----Corbet Genealogy Ring

Roger Corbett's Shropshire Land Holdings in Domesday 1086
Corbet and FitzCorbet, a Norman family from Pays de Caux claims ancient Viking origin from the original settlers in Normandy under Rollo, the first Duke of Normandy. The father, called Le Normand, or simply Norman, had four sons, Hugue(Hugh/Hugo), Roger, Reynaud and Robert. Hugh and Reynaud stayed in Normandy in the senior family domains. The family adopted the surname Moreton in Normandy. The father, and sons Roger and Robert, were at the Battle of Hastings. Between them, they were granted 38 lordships in Shropshire where they assisted Earl Roger in the administration of his domains in that county. Roger Corbet built a border fortress at his Castle at Alfreton which he named Caux Castle after his home domain in Normandy. It was later spelt Cause. The holdings in Derbyshire of the father, called Norman, Roger the second eldest son and Robert the youngest son, both sons sometimes listed as FitzCorbet, are listed together as family domains. They were under-tenants of Earl Roger in Shropshire.
Edderton
Forden
Hem
Hopton
Hyssington
Leighton
Mellington
Thornbury
Weston
Roger & Robert FitzCorbet's Shropshire Land Holdings in Domesday 1086:
Acton
Burnell
Alberbury
Brompton
Cardestone
Cause
Choulton
Eyton
Farley
Great
Hanwood
Longden
Loton
Marrington
Middleton(Chirbury)
Oakes
Pontesbury
Preist
Weston
Ratlinghope
Stapleton
Wattlesborough
Welbatch
Wentnor
Westbury
Whitton
Winsley
Wollaston
Wormerton
Woodcote
Woolstaston
Worthen
Yockleton

-source: http://www.infokey.com/domesday/shropshire.htm
1046 Hugh Corbet 1050 Renaud Corbet 1169 Bartholomew Toret de Moreton 1135 - 1194 Peter Fitz Toret 59 59 1137 - 1205 Lucia Haget 68 68 1170 Letice Moreton 1100 Thoredi Toret 1100 Bertram Haget 1140 Bertram Haget 1283 - 1309 Llywelyn ap Owain 26 26 1279 Jane verch Owain de la Pole 1291 Hawise Gadarn verch Owain 1291 Gruffydd ap Owain 1293 Owain ap Owain de la Pole 1298 - 1326 Eudes la Zouche 28 28 1244 - 1326 Edmund Deincourt 82 82 1198 Nichole de Camville 1198 John Deincourt 1811 James Scott 1814 Judith Scott 1815 Anna Marie Scott 1816 Thomas Scott 1817 Peyton Scott 1825 Elizabeth Scott 1828 Minor Scott 1836 William Scott 1762 - 1825 Benjamin Allen Pate 63 63 1770 - 1805 Judith Pate 35 35 1794 Allen Pate 1796 Mildred Amelia Pate 1798 Nancy Pate 1800 Paten Pate 1748 - 1825 Thomas Pate 77 77 Mary Allen 1703 - 1767 Edward Pate 64 64 1701 - 1767 Martha Tinsley 66 66 1738 Matthew Pate 1740 Anthony Pate 1745 Jeremiah Pate 1746 John Pate 1750 Judith Pate John Pate Judith Christian 1678 John Pate 1640 - 1702 Thomas Pate 62 62 Major Thomas Pate, died 1702, married Elizabeth Early.
Record of his children is from Abingam Parish Records, from a book called "The Hendricks and their Kin" by Jasper R. Hendricks, 249 Hudson AVe. Clarendon Hills, IL in 1962.

Maj. Thomas Pate served as Justice of Gloucester Co. VA in 1686.

From "The Buford Family In America" (Beaufort) "This was Major Thomas Pate of Petsworth Parish, Gloucester, at whose house Nathaniel Bacon the rebel, died in Oct. 16, 1676, being buried in the bed of Poropotauck to prevent Berkley from hanging his corpse on the gibblet." The records of Gloucester were destroyed by fire in 1820 so it is hard to trace Maj. Thomas Pate's descendants. But he
did leave two sons, John and Matthew.
Elizabeth Early Matthew Pate Mary Pate Edward Pate Sarah Pate Anthony Pate Jeremiah Pate Thomas Tinsley 1720 Martha Ragland 1700 John Ragland 1703 - 1745 Anne Beaufort 42 42 1721 John Ragland 1724 William Ragland 1719 Samuel Ragland 1730 James Ragland 1728 Evan Ragland 1733 Pettus Ragland 1735 Frances Ragland !Source: "Our Kin of Bedford Co.". She married a Jeremiah Pate..not sure if this is "our" Jeremiah.
Sarah Ragland 1745 Jeremiah Pate Mary Edward Pate D. 1166 Hugh de Chesney 1095 Agnes de Chesney 1125 - 1165 Simon Corbet 40 40 1030 Emma Crispin 1036 Gilbert Crispin 0994 - 1007 Fulk d' Aunou 13 13 0952 Wigelius de Courcy 0970 Tesselin Rouen 0989 - 1040 Gilbert de Brienne 51 51 Gislebert, surnamed Crispin, Earl of Brion, in Normandy, whose eldest son [was] Richard FitzGilbert. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 118, Clare, Lords of Clare, Earls of Hertford, Earls of Gloucester]

---

Gilbert, Count of Brionne
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Gilbert/Giselbert "Crispin", Count of Brionne and Eu, (ca. 1002-1040), the great progenitor of the illustrious house of Clare, of the Barons Fitz Walter, and the Earls of Gloucester and Hertford was the son of an illegitimate child of Richard the Fearless and inherited Brionne, becoming one of the most powerful landowners in Normandy. He married Gunnora d'Aunou, He had children by his wife and a mistress.

(prob) Esilia Crispin, (b. ca. 1028), (d. ca. 1072). m. William Malet, Seigneur of Graville, (ca. 1042).
Sir Richard Fitz Gilbert (b. ca. 1035).
Baldwin de Clare.

When Robert I, Duke of Normandy died in 1035 his illegitimate son William inherited his father's title. Several leading Normans, including Gilbert of Brionne, Osbern the Seneschal and Alan of Brittany, became William's guardians.

A number of Norman barons including Raoul de Gacé would not accept an illegitimate son as their leader. In 1040 an attempt was made to kill William but the plot failed. Gilbert however was murdered while he was peaceably riding near Eschafour. It is believed two of his killers were Ralph of Wacy and Robert de Vitot. This appears to have been an act of vengeance for wrongs inflicted upon the orphan children of Giroie by Gilbert, and it is not clear what Raoul de Gacé had to do in the business. Fearing they might meet their father's fate, his sons Richard and his brother Baldwin were conveyed by their friends to the court of Baldwin, Count of Flanders.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert%2C_Count_of_Brionne"
1146 Geoffrey de la Haye 1110 Cecily de la Haye 1152 Agnes de la Haye 0970 Muriella De Normandy Sources:
Title: DeMontfort.ged
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Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: 7 Feb 2005
Title: William de Talbot.ged
Repository:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: 10 Feb 2005
Title: Robert de Brus.ged
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Text: Date of Import: 12 Feb 2005
Title: Emma of Brittany.ged
Repository:
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Text: Date of Import: 12 Feb 2005
Title: The Magnificent.ged
Repository:
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Text: Date of Import: 12 Feb 2005
Title: geoffery de neville.ged
Repository:
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Text: Date of Import: 2 Apr 2005
1000 Gunnora d'Aunou 1006 Robert de Courcy 1274 Sibyl Corbet 1177 Lucy Toret 1171 Philip Toret 1175 Gerard Toret 1125 John de Chesney de Caiseneto Hist East Rudham: Coxford Priory Manor-William Cheney founded the church of St Mary of Rudham ,a priory,in the reign of King Steven,but was removed to a place more east called Coxford.

John De Caineto,Querceto,or de Cheyney, was a great benefactor,or founder of it ,for canons of the order of Sr Austin and dedicated to God. who gave them the churches of East and West Rudham,with their appertenanccs,and all the lay-land which the priest held-what Ralph de Querceta,his grandfather and William his son,held in perpetual alms;also the gardens of reke,Godwin ,Lambert,Wilmont,Warin,and Alman the mill, and pool, of Cokeford Cadwellwong,the water of Tatersel,and Kettleswang,and all Nowmerewaug,Ralph Fitz Ulmer,and his land,Burstan,and hillands ,etc and etc for the souls of his grandfather Ralph,and his wife,of his father and his wife,of William de Querceto(Cheney),his uncle,and his wife, and Roger and his wife,his sisters an d Waleran de Rochford.except only the service of the Earl Warren,as free as his father held it. this seems to have been between the years 1140 and 1149.

Some portion of this Manor passed to his daughters, as Hervey Beleth grandson thru Emma passed the Lordship of East Rudham to Coxford Manor on his death

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rlord335&id=I1455&style=TABLE
Elizabeth Pate William Pate Jeremiah Early 1669 Elizabeth Buford Jeremiah Early John Buford 1642 Elizabeth Parrot 1663 Thomas Buford 1665 Ambrose Buford 1667 Susanna Buford Richard Buford Emigration: 1 AUG 1635 LANCASTER COUNTY, VA

Source given as Huttons List of Emigrants
In 1635, had 300 acres of land on the north side of the Rappahannock River assigned to him. This part of Lancaster became Middlesex County.
D. 1700 Thomas Tinsley Elizabeth Randolph Susanna Ragland Thomas Ragland 1726 Edward Ragland 1737 Mary Ragland 1746 Anne Ragland John Beaufort Sources:
Title: Michael Hunter
Note:
Michael Hunter, Source Medium: Other
.
Text: Date of Import: Oct 23, 2006
Katherine Swinford 1620 Robert Lovering 1637 John Lovering 1578 Nathan Louvering 1582 Ann Stanton 1625 John Lovering 1505 - 1580 Abel Loving 75 75 1688 Demetrius Gravis James 1620 Demetrius James http://www.ericjames.org/html/fam/fam35165.htm  1625 Anne Bate 1601 William James http://www.ericjames.org/html/fam/fam37027.htm  1600 Jane Miller Thomas Croke John Wyndham Humphrey Wyndham Charles Wyndham 1503 Joan Sydenham John Sydenham D. 1521 John Sydenham Son and heir; the second Sydenham of Orchard, Somerset; of Merston/Meryston, Devon.

Sources:
Sydenham, History of the Sydenham Family, 1928, pages 153 
Elizabeth Gambon John Gambon Of Merston, Devon; owner of the manors of Merston, Cullompton, Budley, and Gamberston in Devon.

Sources:
Sydenham, History of the Sydenham Family, 1928, pages 153 
D. 1463 John Sydenham Younger son; of Badialton, Somerset; the first Sydenham of Orchard, Somerset, in right of his wife.

Sources:
Sydenham, History of the Sydenham Family, 1928, pages 153
D. 1493 Joan Popham D. 1420 Henry Sydenham Eldest son of Richard, the Judge; of Bossington; later of Combe Sydenham, Stogumber, Somerset; living 1403.

Sources:
Sydenham, History of the Sydenham Family, 1928, pages 103-107
Joan Dalingrigge D. 1412 Margaret Whitton 1340 - 1402 Richard Sydenham 62 62 Younger son; a barrister and Judge of Common Pleas; bought the manor of Combe, in Stogumber, Somerset

Sources:
Sydenham, History of the Sydenham Family, 1928, pages 101-103
Roger Sydenham Agnes Boye John Sydenham D. 1375 John Whitton Of Bossington; had estates in Wiltshire, Somerset, Southampton, Sussex, and Surrey; also called Whyton. First husband of Joan. 1

Sources:
Sydenham, 1928, pages 103-104
D. 1412 Joan Hussey Edmund Husssey Knight; of Holbrook.

Sources:
Burke's Dormant and Extinct peerage (DEP), 1883, page 291
William Sydenham Joan Gothayte Simon Sydenham WIlliam Sydenham William de Gothayte Gothayte is now called Cothay and is near Kittisford in SW Somerset.
John Sydenham Son of Walter de Sydenham; called John Russel de Sydenham; living 1289, 1300.

Sources:
Sydenham, History of the Sydenham Family, 1928, pages 13-15 
Kittesford John de Kittesford Kittisford is in SW Somerset, 3 miles S of Wiveliscombe and 4 miles WNW of Wellington.

Sources:
Sydenham, 1928, page 15
Walter Sydenham Occurs 1280 John Sydenham Of Melbury Robert de Sydenham Philip Sydenham William Sydenham Walter de Sydenham Occurs 1182-3 WIlliam de Sideham D. 1335 Robert Dalingrigge Joan de la Lynde 1311 Roger Dalingrigge 1248 - 1317 Walter de la Lynde 69 69 Of Broomfield; had five daughters, his coheiresses. Richard Popham Of Alfoxton, in the parish of Stringston, Somerset, which he bought from James Ayshe in 1420. Stringston is in Cannington Hundred,

Sources:
Victoria County History of Somerset (1992) Vol 6, pp 172-5
Joan Orchard Thomas Popham Serjeant at law; second husband of Dyonisia Luttrell; their son, Richard, was of Alfoxton.

Sources:
Collinson's Somerset (1791) I.264, III.499
Dyonisia Luttrell John de Orchard Of Orchard (now called Orchard Wyndham), in the parish of Saint Decuman's, Williton, Somerset.

Sources:
Collinson's Somerset (1791) III, 489
Joan Luccombe Ralph Luccombe Sources:
Collinson's Somerset (1791) III, 489 
John de Orchard Sources:
Collinson's Somerset (1791) III, 489
D. 1360 John de Orchard Sources:
Collinson's Somerset (1791) III, 489
Alice Middleney John de Orchard Granted his mother a pension of four pounds per annum 1308 in exchange for lands in Orchard and Curlond.

Sources:
Collinson's Somerset (1791) III, 489 
D. 1308 Thomas de Horchard Margaret Champflore Gilbert Orchard Lucas Champflore D. 1522 William Hody Eleanor Mallett Joan Hody Jane Hody D. 1441 John Hody Elizabeth Jewe Margarett Huddy John Hody Thomas Hody Lord of the manor of Kington Magna, near Shaftesbury, Dorset; king's escheator under King Henry V. 1

Sources:
Dictionary of National Biography (article on Sir John Hody)
Margaret Cole Alexander Hody John Cole Of Nitheway, Torbay, Devon.

Sources:
Dictionary of National Biography (article on Sir John Hody) 
John Jewe Baldwin Mallett Of Corypole, Somerset; perhaps a son of Thomas Malet of Currypool who died in 1440. 1

Sources:
A) Burke's Peerage (1999) p 1830 (Malet, Bt); B) Collinson's History of Somerset (1791) I.91
D. 1440 Thomas Malet Son of Baldwin Malet by Amice Lyffe; Currypool was released to him for life by his brother Hugh 1433. Perhaps grandfather of Eleanor Malet who married Sir William Hody. 1

Sources:
A) Burke's Peerage (1999) p 1830 (Malet, Bt); B) Collinson's History of Somerset (1791) I.91
D. 1416 Baldwin Malet D. 1436 Amice Lyffe Hugh Malet D. 1349 John Malet Of Enmore and Deardon.

Sources:
A) Burke's Peerage (1999) p 1830 (Malet, Bt); B) Collinson's History of Somerset (1791) I.91
Elizabeth Kingston 1300 - 1328 George de Meriet 28 28 D. 1369 Isabel Agnes de Meriet 1276 - 1308 John de Meriet 32 32 Lord of Meriet, Somerset and of Castle Carlton, Lincolnshire.

Sources:
B.W. Greenfield, The family of Meriet (1884) pages 20-2
Margery