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Family Subtree Diagram : ..Margaret Howard (1538)

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child) (two children) (two children) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (five children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (three children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (four children) (two children) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (three children) (a child) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (five children) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (six children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (six children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) 1517 - 1577 Frances De Vere 60 60 1516 - 1547 Henry Howard 31 31 1494 Elizabeth Stafford Thomas III Howard 1494 Elizabeth Trussel D. 1539 John De Vere Eleanore Percy 1476 Edward Stafford Katherine Wydeville 1455 Henry Stafford Margaret Beaufort 1424 - 1455 Humphrey Stafford 31 31 Faris (1999, p. 340): "HUMPHREY STAFFORD, styled Earl of Stafford, first son and heir apparent, was married to MARGARET BEAUFORT, daughter, and in her issue heiress, of Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset (descendant of King Edward I), by
Alianor, second daughter of Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick (descendant of King Edward I) [see SOMERSET 9 for her ancestry]. HUMPHREY STAFFORD died v.p., said to have been slain on the Lancastrian side on 22 May 1455 at the first Battle of
St. Albans. His widow was married for the second time to RICHARD DARELL, Knt., of Lillingstone Dayrell, co. Buckingham, and had issue. She died in 1474. C.P. 1:342 (1910). C.P. 2:389 (1912). C.P. 12(1):182 (1953). Paget (1957) 500:3. Paget
(1977), p. 257."
1411 - 1480 Anne de Neville 69 69 Anne Neville; married 1st by 18 Oct 1424 1st Duke of Buckingham of the 1444 creation (killed 10 July 1460) and had issue; married 2nd by 25 Nov 1467, as his 2nd wife, 1st Lord (Baron) Mountjoy (died 1 Aug 1474) and died 29 Sep 1480, having had
no issue by her 2nd husband. [Burke's Peerage]

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    He [Walter Blount] married, 2ndly, before 25 November 1467, Anne, widow of Humphrey (STAFFORD), DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM (died 1460), and daughter of Ralph (NEVILLE), EARL OF WESTMORLAND, by Joan DE BEAUFORT, legitimated da. of John of Gaunt. He died
    1 August 1474, and was buried in the chapel of the Apostles in the Church of the Grey Friars, London. His widow, by whom he had no issue, and who continued to be known as Duchess of Buckingham, had dower assigned 11 March 1474/5. She died 20
    September 1480, and was buried at Pleshey, Essex. [Complete Peerage IX:334-6

# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 17, 2680
# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: IX:336
1402 - 1460 Humphrey Sandford 57 57 Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham, so created 14 Sep 1444, as also earlier 1431 Count of Perche, Normandy (part of Henry VI's policy of conferring native fiefs on his leading supporters in English-occupied France), having apparently
already been recognized as Earl of Buckingham (in right of his mother), KG (1429), PC (1424); born 15 Aug 1402; knight 1421, Lt-General of Normandy 1430-32; Seneschal of Halton 1439, Captain of Calais and Lt of the Marches 1442-51, Ambassador
to France 1446, Warden of the Cinque Ports and Constable of Dover and Queensborough Castles 1450; married by 18 Oct 1424 Anne, daughter of the 1st Earl of Westmorland, and was killed fighting on the Lancastrian side at the Battle of Northampton
10 July 1460. [Burke's Peerage]

# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2680
1069 - 1135 Henry England 66 66 Henry I (of England) (1068-1135), third Norman king of England (1100-1135), fourth son of William the Conqueror. Henry was born in Selby. Because his father, who died in 1087, left him no land, Henry made several unsuccessful attempts to gain territories on the Continent. On the death of his brother William II in 1100, Henry took advantage of the absence of another brother—Robert, who had a prior claim to the throne—to seize the royal treasury and have himself crowned king at Westminster. Henry subsequently secured his position with the nobles and with the church by issuing a charter of liberties that acknowledged the feudal rights of the nobles and the rights of the church. In 1101 Robert, who was duke of Normandy, invaded England, but Henry persuaded him to withdraw by promising him a pension and military aid on the Continent. In 1102 Henry put down a revolt of nobles, who subsequently took refuge in Normandy (Normandie), where they were aided by Robert. By defeating Robert at Tinchebray, France, in 1106, Henry won Normandy. During the rest of his reign, however, he constantly had to put down uprisings that threatened his rule in Normandy. The conflict between Henry and Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, over the question of lay investiture (the appointment of church officials by the king), was settled in 1107 by a compromise that left the king with substantial control in the matter.

Because he had no surviving male heir, Henry was forced to designate his daughter Matilda as his heiress. After his death on December 1, 1135, at Lyons-la-Fôret, Normandy, however, Henry's nephew, Stephen of Blois, usurped the throne, plunging the country into a protracted civil war that ended only with the accession of Matilda's son, Henry II, in 1154.

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Henry I (c.1068 - December 1, 1135), called Henry Beauclerk or Henry Beauclerc because of his scholarly interests, was the youngest son of William the Conqueror. He reigned as King of England from 1100 to 1135, succeeding his brother, William II Rufus. He was also known by the nickname "Lion of Justice". His reign is noted for his limitations on the power of the crown, his improvements in the machinery of government, his reuniting of the dominions of his father, and his controversial decision to name his daughter as his heir.

Henry was born between May 1068 and May 1069, probably in Selby, Yorkshire in England. As the youngest son of the family, he was most likely expected to become a bishop and was given extensive schooling for a young nobleman of that time period. He was probably the first Norman ruler to be fluent in English.

His father William, upon his death in 1087, bequeathed his dominions to his sons in the following manner:

Robert received the Duchy of Normandy
William received the Kingdom of England
Henry received 5000 pounds of silver
It is reported that he prophesied that Henry would eventually get everything his father had (Cross, 1917).

The two older brothers made an agreement that if either died without an heir, the two dominions of their father would be reunited under the surviving brother. When William II died in 1100, however, Robert was returning from the First Crusade. His absence, along with his poor reputation among the Norman nobles, allowed Henry to seize the keys of the royal hoard at Winchester. He was accepted as king by the leading barons and was crowned three days later on August 5 at Westminster. He immediately secured his position among the nobles by issuing the Charter of Liberties, which is considered a forerunner of the Magna Carta.

On November 11, 1100 Henry married Edith, daughter of King Malcolm III of Scotland. Since Edith was also the niece of Edgar Atheling, the marriage united the Norman line with old English line of kings. The marriage greatly displeased the Norman barons, however, and as a concession to their sensibilities, Edith changed her named to Matilda upon becoming queen.

The following year in 1101, Robert Curthose attempted to seize back the crown by an invading England. In the Treaty of Alton, Robert agreed to recognize Henry as king of England and return peacefully to Normandy, upon receipt of an annual sum of 2000 marks, which Henry proceeded to pay.

In 1105, to eliminate the continuing threat from Robert, Henry led an expeditionary force across the English Channel. In 1106, he decisively defeated his brother's Norman army at Tinchebray. He imprisoned his brother and appropriated the Duchy of Normandy as a possession of England, thus reuniting his father's dominions.

As king, Henry carried out social and judicial reforms, including:

issuing the Charter of Liberties
restoring laws of King Edward the Confessor.
He had two children by Matilda before her death in 1118: Maud, born February 1102, and William Adelin, born November 1103. On January 29, 1121, he married Adeliza, daughter of Godfrey, Count of Louvain, but there were no children from this marriage. He also holds the record for the largest number of acknowledged illegitimate children born to any English king, with a provisional total of twenty-five. One of his illegitimate daughters, Sybilla, married King Alexander I of Scotland.

However, his only legitimate son William Adelin perished in the wreck of the White Ship, on November 25, 1120, off the coast of Normandy. Also among the dead were Henry's illegitimate son Richard and illegitimate daughter Matilda, Countess of Perche, as well as a niece, Lucia de Blois.



Left without male heirs, Henry took the unprecedented step of making his barons swear to accept his daughter Matilda, widow of Henry V, the Holy Roman Emperor, as his heir.

Henry died of food poisoning from eating foul lampreys in December, 1135, at St. Denis le Fermont in Normandy and was buried at Reading Abbey.



Although Henry's barons had sworn allegiance to his daughter Matilda as their queen, Matilda's sex and her remarriage to the House of Anjou, an enemy of the Normans, allowed Henry's nephew Stephen of Boulogne to come to England and claim the throne with popular support.

The struggle between Matilda and Stephen resulted in a long civil war known as the Anarchy. The dispute was eventually settled by Stephen's naming of Matilda's son, Henry, as his heir in 1153.

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# Note:

    Henry I was born in the year 1068---a factor he himself regarded as highly significant, for he was the only son of the Conqueror born after the conquest of England, and to Henry this meant he was heir to the throne. He was not an attractive proposition: he was dissolute to a degree, producing at least a score of bastards; but far worse he was prone to sadistic cruelty---on one occasion, for example, personally punishing a rebellious burgher by throwing him from the walls of his town.

# Note:

    At the death of William the Conqueror, Henry was left no lands, merely 5,000 pounds of silver. With these he bought lands from his elder brother Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy, only to see them taken back again a few years later by Robert, in unholy alliance with his brother William Rufus.

# Note:

    Henry could do little to avenge such treatment, but in England he found numerous barons who were tired of the exactions and ambitions of their king. He formed alliances with some of these, notably with the important de Clare family. He and some of the de Clares were with William Rufus on his last hunting expedition, and it is thought that the king's death was the result of Henry's plotting.

# Note:

    Certainly he moved fast to take advantage of it; leaving Rufus's body unattended in the woods, he swooped down on Winchester to take control of the treasury. Two days later he was in Westminster, being crowned by the Bishop of London. His speed is understandable when one realises that his elder brother, Robert [Curthose], was returning from the crusade, and claimed, with good reason, to be the true heir.

# Note:

    Henry showed great good sense in his first actions as King. He arrested Ranulph Flambard, William's tax-gatherer, and recalled Anselm, the exiled Archbishop. Furthermore, he issued a Charter of Liberties which promised speedy redress of grievances, and a return to the good government of the Conqueror. Putting aside for the moment his many mistresses, he married the sister of the King of Scots, who was descended from the royal line of Wessex; and lest the Norman barons should think him too pro-English in this action, he changed her name from Edith to Matilda. No one could claim that he did not aim to please.

# Note:

In 1101 Robert Curthose invaded, but Henry met him at Alton, and persuaded him to go away again by promising him an annuity of £2,000. He had no intention of keeping up the payments, but the problem was temporarily solved.

# Note:

    He now felt strong enough to move against dissident barons who might give trouble in the future. Chief amongst these was the vicious Robert of Bellême, Earl of Shrewsbury, whom Henry had known for many years as a dangerous troublemaker. He set up a number of charges against him in the king's court, making it plain that if he appeared for trial he would be convicted and imprisoned. Thus Robert and his colleagues were forced into rebellion at a time not of their own choosing, were easily defeated and sent scuttling back to Normandy.

# Note:

    In Normandy Robert Curthose began to wreak his wrath on all connected with his brother, thus giving Henry an excellent chance to retaliate with charges of misgovernment and invade. He made two expeditions in 1104-5, before the great expedition of 1106 on which Robert was defeated at the hour-long battle of Tinchebrai, on the anniversary of Hastings. No one had expected such an easy victory, but Henry took advantage of the state of shock resulting from the battle to annex Normandy. Robert was imprisoned (in some comfort, it be said); he lived on for 28 more years, ending up in Cardiff castle whiling away the long hours learning Welsh. His son William Clito remained a free agent, to plague Henry for most of the rest of his reign.

# Note:

    In England the struggle with Anselm over the homage of bishops ran its course until the settlement of 1107. In matters of secular government life was more simple: Henry had found a brilliant administrator, Roger of Salisbury, to act as Justiciar for him. Roger had an inventive mind, a keen grasp of affairs, and the ability to single out young men of promise. He quickly built up a highly efficient team of administrators, and established new routines and forms of organisation within which they could work. To him we owe the Exchequer and its recording system of the Pipe Rolls, the circuits of royal justiciars spreading the king's peace, and the attempts at codification of law. Henry's good relationships with his barons, and with the burgeoning new towns owed much to skilful administration. Certainly he was able to gain a larger and more reliable revenue this way than by the crude extortion his brother had used.

# Note:

    In 1120 came the tragedy of the White Ship. The court was returning to England, and the finest ship in the land was filled with its young men, including Henry's son and heir William. Riotously drunk, they tried to go faster and faster, when suddenly the ship foundered. All hands except a butcher of Rouen were lost, and England was without an heir.

# Note:

    Henry's only legitimate child was Matilda, but she was married to the Emperor Henry V of Germany, and so could not succeed. But in 1125 her husband died, and Henry brought her home and forced the barons to swear fealty to her---though they did not like the prospect of a woman ruler. Henry then married her to Geoffrey of Anjou, the Normans' traditional enemy, and the barons were less happy---especially when the newly-weds had a terrible row, and Geoffrey ordered her out of his lands. In 1131 Henry, absolutely determined, forced the barons to swear fealty once more, and the fact that they did so is testimoney of his controlling power. Matilda and Geoffrey were reunited, and in 1133 she produced a son whom she named for his grandfather. If only Henry could live on until his grandson was old enough to rule, all would be well.

# Note:

    But in 1135, against doctor's orders, he ate a hearty meal of lampreys, got acute indigestion, which turned into fever, and died. He was buried at his abbey in Reading---some said in a silver coffin, for which there was an unsuccessful search at the Dissolution. [Source: Who's Who in the Middle Ages, John Fines, Barnes & Noble Books, New York, 1995]

# Note:

Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 161-9

Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on
Page: Henry I

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 262-27, 33a-23
1379 - 1440 Joan de Beaufort 61 61 Joan Beaufort, d. Howden 13 Nov 1440, widow of Robert Ferrers, daughter of John, Duke of Lancaster and Katharine (Roet) Swynford. [Magna Charta Sureties]

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 2-32

Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 45-7, 47-7, 8-9

Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
Page: 3
Text: 1396
1364 - 1425 Ralph de Neville 61 61     The "Kingmaker's" grandfather, the 1st Earl of Westmorland settled about half the original Neville estates on the children of his second marriage, whereas the subsequent Earls of Westmorland were the product of his first. It thus came about that the 2nd-6th Earls of Westmorland were actually less well-endowed territorially than their ancestors who had been mere barons. The pre-eminence of that branch of the family represented by the Earls of Salisbury/Warwick, who stemmed from the second marriage, was made correspondingly easier.

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    The 1st Earl of Westmorland had multiplicity of children: nine by the first wife, fourteen by his second. Of his 23 in all, four were peers, three were duchesses and another four daughters the wives of lesser peers; moreover of those three duchesses one was mother of two kings. Between 1450 and 1455 no fewer than 13 members of the family had seats in the House of Lords. This very fecundity like that of Edward III, engendered quarrels. There was rivalry between the two branches of the family, which grew from a dispute about family estates into a difference as to dynastic loyalties. It thus served as an overture to the Wars of the Roses, one which was made even more ominous by a dispute between the Nevilles, represented by the 1st Marquess of Montagu and the Percys. [Burke's Peerage]

---------------------------------------------------------------

    Sir Ralph de Neville, KG, b. c 1346, d. Raby 21 Oct 1425, created 1st Earl of Westmorland 1397; m. (1) Margaret Stafford, d. 9 June 1396; m. (2) before 29 Nov 1396 Joan Beaufort, d. Howden 13 Nov 1440, widow of Robert Ferrers, daughter of John, Duke of Lancaster and Katharine (Roet) Swynford. [Magna Charta Sureties]

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    Sixth Baron Neville of Raby, became a Knight of the Garter and 1st Earl Westmoreland September 29, 1397. As a Lancasterian, he opposed Richard II in 1399 and conveyed Richard's resignation to the convention. He assisted in the coronation of Henry IV and was a member of the council of regency appointed to rule in the infancy of King Henry V. With his second marriage to Joan Beaufort, a widowed daughter of John Of Gaunt, fourth son of Edward III, this favorably affected Joan and Ralph's wealth and social prestige, making possible brilliant marriages for their children. In 1450, five of Ralph's sons, five sons-in-law and several grandsons were in Parliament.

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    Held many offices, among them Constable of the Tower of London and in 1399, Marshall of England the year he was created Earl of Richmond. He was a member of Richards II's privy council, saw service at Agincourt on October 25, 1415 where Henry won a victory over the superior numbers of French owing to his superior generalship.

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He married his first wife Margaret, daughter of Hugh, Earl of Stafford by special dispensation from Pope Urban V, because of their close relationship.

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The marriage to Joan, his second wife, was a much more distinguished one as the line now descends through the royal house of England. summoned to Parliament from December 6, 1389 to November 30, 1396.

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Some say he is the son of Elizabeth Latimer

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Was created Earl of Westmorland by Richard II on 9-29-1397
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    Ralph de Nevill, 4th baron, summoned to parliament from 6 December, 1389, to 30 November, 1396. This nobleman took a leading part in the political drama of his day and sustained it with more than ordinary ability. In the lifetime of his father (9th Richard II), he was joined with Thomas Clifford, son of Lord Clifford, and was appointed a commissionership for the guardianship of the West Marches. In three years after this he succeeded to the title, and in two years subsequently he was one of the commissioners appointed to treat with the Kings of France and Scotland, touching a truce made by them with the King of England. In the 21st Richard II [1378], he was made constable of the Tower of London and shortly afterwards advanced in full parliament to the dignity of Earl of Westmoreland. His lordship was of the privy council to King Richard and had much favour from that monarch, yet he was one of the most active in raising Henry, of Lancaster, to the throne as Henry IV, and was rewarded by the new king in the first year of his reign with a grant of the county and honour of Richmond for his life, and with the great office of Earl Marshal of England. Soon after this, he stoutly resisted the Earl of Northumberland in his rebellion and forced the Percies, who had advanced as far as Durham, to fall back upon Prudhoe, when the battle of Shrewsbury ensued, in which the gallant Hotspur sustained so signal a defeat, and closed his impetuous career. The earl was afterwards governor of the town and castle of Carlisle, warden of the West Marches towards Scotland, and governor of Roxborough. He was also a knight of the Garter. His lordship m. 1st, Lady Margaret Stafford, dau. of Hugh, Earl Stafford, K.G., for which marriage a dispensation was obtained from Pope Urban V, the earl and his bride being within the third and fourth degrees of consanguinity; by this lady he had issue, John, Lord Nevill; Ralph; Maud; Phillippa; Alice; Margaret; Anne; Margery; and Elizabeth. The earl m. 2ndly, Joan de Beaufort, dau. of John of Gaunt, by Katherine Swynford, and widow of Robert, Lord Ferrers, of Wem, by whom he had issue, Richard; William; George; Edward; Cuthbert; Henry; Thomas; Catherine; Eleanor; Anne; Jane; and Cicely. This great earl d. in 1425 and was s. by his grandson, Ralph Nevill, 5th Baron Nevill, of Raby. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, pp. 393-4, Nevill, Barons Nevill, of Raby, Earls of Westmoreland]

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Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 10-33, 207-34

Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 45-7, 47-7, 8-9, 8a-9

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 12-13, 14

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/1:450

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tamer&id=I5824

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1st Earl of Westmoreland, 6th Baron Raby, K. G.

Neville, Ralph, 1st Earl of Westmorland (1364?-1425), English soldier and statesman. Born the 4th Baron Neville of Raby, Neville was knighted in 1380 and created earl of Westmorland in 1397 by Richard II in recognition of his assistance to Richard against the lords appellant (a coterie of noblemen who had accused Richard’s supporters of treason).

Neville rebelled against Richard II in 1399 and assisted Henry IV in gaining the crown, for which he was granted the office of marshal of England for life. After the defeat of Henry Percy, 1st earl of Northumberland, and his son Sir Henry Percy, called Hotspur, in their revolt against Henry IV in 1403 at the Battle of Shrewsbury, Westmorland was given the wardenship of the west marches. In the revolt of 1405, in which Archbishop Richard Scrope and Thomas Mowbray, 3rd earl of Nottingham, accused Henry of treason, Neville took Scrope and Mowbray prisoners. Neville was thereafter constantly occupied in negotiations to keep the peace on the Scottish border, and was one of the executors of Henry V's will and regent for his son.

Neville was succeeded in the earldom by his grandson, Ralph Neville, who died in 1484. The title remained with his descendants until it reverted to the crown with the condemnation in 1571 of Charles Neville, 6th earl of Westmorland, for his part in the attempted liberation of Mary, Queen of Scots.

© 1993-2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

1400 - 1461 Richard de Neville 61 61 Neville, Richard, Earl of Salisbury (1400-1460), English soldier, who supported the Yorkist side during the Wars of the Roses. Neville was the son of Ralph Neville, 1st earl of Westmorland. In 1425 Neville married Alice, the only daughter of Thomas Montagu, 4th earl of Salisbury. Upon Montagu’s death in 1428, Neville inherited his holdings and assumed his title.

Neville was warden of both the western and the northern marches and from 1453 to 1455 was chancellor during the protectorate of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd duke of York. In 1459 he joined the Yorkists against King Henry VI, a Lancastrian, and participated in the Yorkist victory at Blore Heath in 1459. After the Yorkist defeat at Ludford later in the year, Neville was forced to seek refuge in France.

Neville returned to London in 1460 and after the king's capture at Northampton was made great chamberlain of England. But in December 1460, the night after the attle of Wakefield during which Richard Plantagenet was killed, Neville was captured by the Lancastrians and taken to Pontefract Castle, where he was murdered. His eldest son, Richard Neville, called the Kingmaker, was the 2nd earl of Salisbury in the Neville line and also earl of Warwick by marriage.

© 1993-2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

1417 Edward de Neville 1410 George Neville 1415 Cecily de Neville 1397 - 1477 Katherine Neville 80 80 1091 Maud England 1208 - 1273 Roger de Somery 65 65 ROGER DE SOMERY, uncle and heir. In 1229 he made an agreement with Maurice de Gant, granting to the latter Dudley and Sedgley for 7 years, and undertaking not to marry within that term without Maurice's consent. On 20 April 1230 he was granted protection. In 1233 his lands were seized because he had not come to be knighted; and in January 1233/4 he was appointed to remain at Shrewsbury to maintain order in those parts. On 11 July 1245 he was summoned to be at Chester with arms and
horses; and on 30 July 1247 he had a grant of free warren at Chipping Campden, Gloucester, and Sedgley, Staffs. In 1251 he was in a commission; in May 1253 was going to Gascony; and on 3 November 1253 he was granted free warren at Clent. In December 1253 and January 1253/4 he was with the King. In July 1257 he was summoned to Chester to go to Wales with the King. In 1258 he was one of 12 elected to treat with the King's Council, and one of the 24 appointed by the barons. In 1260 he was summoned to London and later to Shrewsbury, and on 11 September 1261 to St. Albans. In 1262 he was to be warned for building a castle at Dudley without licence. On 23 December 1262 he was summoned to be at Worcester, and on 25 May 1263 to be at Hereford. On 10 August 1263 he was directed to deliver to Hamon Lestrange the cos. of Salop and Staffs; and on 17 October was summoned to Windsor. On 16 March 1263/4 he obtained licence to enclose his manor houses of Dudley, Staffs, and Weoley, Worcs, with a ditch and wall of stone, and fortify and crenellate them. On 30 January 1265/6 he was granted protection as going to the Marches on the King's service. In 1267 he was commissioned with others to hear complaints and to
carry out the terms of the dictum of Kenilworth, and to complete the peace with Llewelin. In 1268 with Philip Basset and others he was elected by the Counties of Hereford, Salop, Staffs and Warwick, to act with the Council of the earls and barons; and was appointed as a commissioner to ordain the aid for a number of countics. In 1268 also he was appointed to settle affairs in the March; and on 28 April 1269 to hear contentions in Wales. On 12 February 1269/70 he was granted a market and a yearly fair at Newport (Pagnell), Bucks; on 16 October 1270 he was sent as envoy to Llewelin. In June 1271 he pronounced a sentence of excommunication against an official of Canterbury, which was subsequently cancelled by the Chancellor.

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2nd son of Ralph de Someri and his wife Philippa Basset, son of John de Someri and his wife Hawise, daughter of Gervase Paganel and Isabel de Bellomont, daughter of Robert de Bellomont, Earl of Leicester.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 732)

Roger de Someri, 2nd son, had livery of the Barony of Dudley, on the death of his nephew in 1229. He married 1st Nichola, daughter of William de Albina, surety for the Magna Charta, and had four daughters--Joan, Mable, Maud and Margaret. He married 2nd Amabel, daughter of Sir Robert de Chacombe.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 286)

Roger de Somery died in 1273. The writ for the inquisition on his death is dated August 26, and shows that he held lands of his own inheritance in nine counties of England, and also, of the inheritance of his first wife, Nicola de Albini, the manor of Barrow-on-Soar, Leicestershire, and that of Campden in Gloucestershire. The lands of his own inheritance descended, of course, to his eldest son Roger, issue of his second wife, Amabel de Chaucombe, while those of Nicola de Albini were divided among her four daughters.
(Le Strange Records, page 159)
1399 - 1463 Eleanor Neville 64 64 1538 - 1590 Margaret Howard 52 52 1073 - 1163 Nest verch Deheubarth Rhys 90 90 # Note:

    Nest (who also [in addition to Gerald fitz Walter] had by Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, a son (Robert fitz Stephen) and by Henry I another son (Henry, killed 1158, father of Meiler fitz Henry), daughter of Rhys ap Tudor Mawr, Prince of South Wales. [Burke's Peerage, p. 1679]

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He [Gerald de Windsor] married Nest, daughter of Rhys ap Tudor Mawr, PRINCE OF SOUTH WALES (e). The date of his death is not known, presumably before 1136. [Complete Peerage X:10-11, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

# Note:

    (e) In 1106, when Owen ap Cadugan carried her off, two of her sons and a daughter by Gerald de Windsor were taken with her, the sons being returned later to their father. By Stephen, constable of Cardigan (query after Gerald's death), Nest bore a son, Robert FitzStephen, and by Henry I a son Henry (killed 1158), father of Meiler FitzHenry, which Robert and Meiler were later brothers-in-arms of the Geraldines in Ireland.

# Note:

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 496, 1679

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 33a-23

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: X:11
1214 - 1281 Isabel Bertram 67 67 1187 - 1242 Roger Bertram 55 55 Roger Bertram II, then a feudal lord, being involved in the proceedings of the Barons, in the 17th of King John, his castle and lands of Mitford were seized, and conferred upon that iniquitous minion of the crown, Philip de Ulcote. He afterwards made his peace and in that year was sheriff of Northumberland, an office which he retained for six years afterwards. After the death of King John, he made homage to Henry III, and by a fine of œ100, procured repeated orders for the restitution of his lands, to which Ulcote continued to turn a deaf ear, until he was informed that if he did not speedily restore the claimant to his possessions, immediate seizure should be made of all his estates in Northampton, York and Durham. This threat succeeded, and the Baron of Mitford soon after became so distinguished for his loyalty that he was frequently employed in state affairs of considerable importance. On July 15, 1220, he was one of the English barons who swore to see Henry III's obligation to marry his sister Margaret to Alexander, King of Scotland, carried into effect. In August following he was a witness to the convention between the King and Geoffrey de Marisco, on the latter being appointed justiciary of Ireland. In 1224 the crown discharged him from the payment of his portion of the scutage of Wales. Roger de Lexington, Roger Bertram and Jordan Hayron were justices itinerant at New Castle in 1225. In 1228 he and others of the northern barons had a mandate to meet King Alexander of Scotland at Berwick and give him safe conduct to a conference between him and the King of England at York. In March, 1237, he was a witness to the agreement made before Cardinal Otto, the Pope's legate at York, respecting the differences between England and Scotland. The sheriff's roll for 1242 credits him for the payment of 30 marks for not attending the King into Gascony; and Dugdale quotes Matthew, of Westminster, to show that he died in the same year. His heir in 28th of Henry III, 1243, is described as in the custody of the King.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 703)
D. 1237 Agnes Roger Bertram Pagan Bertram Pagan Bertram, who was seized of the lordship of Felton, which denominated his posterity. This family, surnamed Felton from the lordship of Felton in Northumberland County, is a younger branch of the Bertrams, Barons of Mitford, who as stated above possessed the lordships of Gretham, Felton, Mitford and Eland. Pagan Bertram-Felton had two sons: William, the eldest, whose line terminated in daughters, and Robert (or Roger) Felton.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 733)
1211 Ada Bertram 1216 - 1275 Christian Bertram 59 59 1159 Alice de Umfreville 1157 - 1206 William Bertram 49 49 William Bertram II, in 1196, occurs as son and heir of Roger, and accounts to the sheriff of that year for his barony, which then consisted of the parishes of Greatham, Felton, Mitford and Ponteland. He confirmed to the monks of Brinkburne all the grants which his grandfather William and his father Roger had made to them, and died about the year 1199. He married Alice, daughter of Odonell Umfreville, and sister of Robert Umfreville, who gave her the villes of Great Bavington and Kirklawe, with the service of Robert of Divellstone in North Milbourne, besides the forest of Ottercope and right of a free chase on certain lands on the west side of Rede, about Corsenside. William Bertram died in the 7th year of King John, 1206, for at that time we find King John conferring the wardship of his lordship's son and heir, Roger, upon Peter de Brus with the custody of his lands during his minority, in consideration of the sum of 300 marks.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 702-703)

WILLIAM BERTRAM who obtained a grant from the Crown, 5 John (1204), of the manor of Felton, in Northumberland; married Alice, sister of Robert de Umfravil; died before 7 John (1206), for in that year the wardship of his son Roger was conferred by King John upon Peter de Brus.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 166)
1410 Frederick Tilney Sir Frederick Tilney of Ashwellthorpe
son of Philip and Isabel Thorpe
1389 Philip Tilney PHILIP TILNEY, Gent., of Boston, Ringborough, Fisherwick, etc.,and,in right of his wife, of Ashwellthorpe, Colkirk, North Creak and Massingham Parva, Norfolk, Sheriff of Lincolnshire, alderman of the Corpus

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Christi guild, Boston, son and heir, born say 1400 (of age by 1422). He married ISABEL THORPE, daughter and co-heiress of Edmund Thorpe, Knt.,5th Lord Thorpe, of Ashwellthorpe, Norfolk, Knight of the Shire for Norfolk, by Joan, daughter and heiress of John de Northwood. They had three sons, Frederick, Robert, and Hugh, and three daughters, Maud,Grace (wife of Oliver Sutton) and Marion. She died 10 Nov. 1436, and was buried (M.I.) at Ashwellthorpe.
1389 - 1436 Isabel de Thorpe 47 47 1367 - 1406 Frederick de Tilney 39 39 MARGARET ROCHFORD, daughter and co-heiress, born say 1380. She married FREDERICK TILNEY, Knt., of Boston, co. Lincoln, son and heir of Philip de Tilney, Knt., of Boston and Lonedon (in Tydd St. Mary),co. Lincoln, and Ringborough in Holderness, co. York, Knight of the Shire for Lincolnshire, deputy butler, Boston, Sheriff of cos. Cambridge and Huntingdon, Chief steward of the duchy of Lancaster for the North Parts, Steward to Bishop Fordham of Ely, Alderman of Corpus Christi guild, Boston, by his wife, Grace, daughter evidently of John Roos, of Ringborough and Tydd St. Mary. They had three sons, Philip,Richard (clerk), and William. SIR FREDERICK TILNEY was living in 1406, and was dead before 1412. In 1423 she was co-heiress to her Hillary cousin, Lady Elizabeth (de la Plaunche) (Birmingham) (Grey)(Clinton) Russell, by which she inherited the manor of Fisherwick, co.Stafford. She was living in 1440, but evidently deceased in or before 1441.
1380 - 1441 Margaret Rochford 61 61 1336 - 1400 Philip Tilney 64 64 1340 Grace Rosse 1305 - 1360 Frederick Tilney 55 55 1315 Margery Lyne 1272 - 1307 Philip Tilney 35 35 1222 Frederick Tilney 1180 Frederick Tilney 1133 - 1185 Alan Tilney 52 52 1092 - 1154 Adam Tilney 62 62 1312 Robert Rosse 1350 John Rochford ALICE HASTINGS, married about 1375 JOHN ROCHFORD, Knt., of Boston,co. Lincoln, medieval writer, Knight of the Shire for Lincolnshire and for Cambridgeshire, Alderman of the Corpus Christi guild, Boston,Steward of the duchy of Lancaster honour of Bolingbroke, co. Lincoln,constable of the Bishop of Ely's castle of Wisbech, co. Cambridge, Boston, younger son of Saier de Rochford, Knt., of Fenn (in Boston), Sheriff and Escheator of Lincolnshire, Knight of the Shire for Lincolnshire, Keeper of the King of France at Somerton Castle, co.Lincoln, by his 2nd wife, Joan, daughter of Roger Hillary, Knt., Chief Justice of the Commons Pleas, of Bescot (in Walsall) and Fisherwick,
Note: co. Stafford and Stretton, co. Warwick. He was born say 1350. They had four daughters, Joan (wife of Robert Roos), Alice (wife of WilliamGibthorpe, Knt.), ____ (wife of John Holbeach, Knt.) and Margaret. He received a good education in England, and afterwards studied in France and Italy. In 1405 he was summoned to meet King Henry IV at Coventry,and accompanied him on his expedition to Wales. Towards the end of his life, he compiled digests of and indexes to various well knownchronicles. SIR JOHN ROCHFORD died 13 Dec. 1410, leaving will dated 20 Oct. 1410, proved 14 Dec. 1410, requesting burial at Barling Abbey, co. Lincoln, next to his late wife, Alice.
1352 Alice de Hastings 1320 Saier de Rochford 1327 Joan Hillary 1300 Roger Hillary 1310 Margaret Sutton 1287 - 1337 John de Sutton 50 50 Sir John de Sutton, of Dudley Castle, Staffs; made over the Castle and Manor of Dudley to Hugh le Despenser by deed 19 Oct 1325, but this grant, extorted from him while in prison, was cancelled 1327 and the property was restored to him; married
Margaret, daughter and heir of Roger de Somery, of Dudley Castle. [Burke's Peerage]

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Margaret de Somery, b. 1290, d. 1384, Baroness Dudley; m. John de Sutton I, Knight, lord of Dudley Castle, co. Stafford, 1326, living 1337, son of Sir Richard de Sutton, b. c 1266, living 1346, lord of Warsop, Sutton, Eakring, and Cotham, co.
Nottingham, by his wife, Isabel Patrick, b. c 1260, d. by 1318, widow of Philip Burnel, daughter and heir of William Patrick, d. by 1279, by his wife, Beatrice de Malpas, d. 1290. Margaret de Somery was sister and heir of John de Somery, b. 1278, dsp 29 Dec 1321. [Ancestral Roots]
1290 - 1384 Margaret de Somery 94 94 1304 John Sutton 1266 - 1346 Richard de Sutton 80 80 Richard de Sutton; born 29 Sep 1266; married Isobel (living 1289/90), daughter and heir of William Patrick by Beatrice, daughter and coheir of David de Malpas. [Burke's Peerage]

Burke's Peerage has Richard's immediate ancestors "of Worksop, Notts", while Ancestral Roots has Richard "of Warsop, Notts". Both places are in Nottingham, but I think he was of one or the other-not both.
1260 Isabel Patrick 1240 - 1273 Robert de Sutton 33 33 Robert de Sutton, of Worksop; b 1240; married Johanna, who had the lands of Ekering and Allerton in dower c1274, and died 1273/4 possessed of the Manors of Theydon and Montem, Essex and those of Aston and Byfeld, Northants. 1245 Johanna 1217 William de Sutton William de Sutton, of Worksop, Notts; b 1217; married 1st Matilda (living 1242) and had issue; married 2nd Eva (married 2nd Robert Paynell and was living 1275/6), and died 1267. 1220 Matilda 1252 Katherine de Sutton 1190 Rowland Sutton Rowland de Sutton; married probably 1215 Alice, daughter of Richard de Lexinton and youngest sister and coheir of Henry de Lexinton, Bishop of Lincoln, and had (William), with a younger son (Robert, ancestor of the Barons Lexinton of Aram).
[Burke's Peerage]
1195 Alice de Lexington 1165 Hervey Sutton Hervey de Sutton; feudal Lord of Sutton-upon-Trent, Notts; gave the Church of Sutton to the Canons of Radford, Notts; had (Rowland), with two elder sons (Robert, dsp, Richard, had five daughters). [Burke's Peerage]
1170 Elizabeth Patrick 1140 Hervey Sutton 1104 Hervey Sutton 1079 Hervey Sutton 1055 - 1086 Seward Sutton 31 31 Seward; feudal Lord of Sutton, Holderness, Yorks; allegedly living 1066, more probably at the time of the Domesday Survey 21 years later; alleged ancestor of [Roland, of Sutton-on-Trent, living c1220]. [Burke's Peerage] 1165 Richard de Lexington 1170 Matilda de Caux 1140 Robert de Lexington 1230 - 1279 William Patrick 49 49 1240 - 1290 Beatrice de Malpas 50 50 1185 - 1252 David de Malpas 67 67 David le Clerc de Malpas, JP (Cheshire); Sheriff of Cheshire 1252; held three knight's fees in Cheshire, his 2nd son [Philip]. [Burke's Peerage]

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David de Malpas, called David le Clerk, was Justice of Chester 34th Henry II, 1188. Three different references assign to each a different wife, but most likely he married Catherine, daughter of Owen Vaughan, Lord of Melior. He may have been married three times. He had William, eldest son, who died without legitimate issue, and left his brother Philip Gogh, surnamed de Egerton, as his legal heir.
1195 - 1227 Beatrix de Mohaut 32 32 1220 David de Malpas 1216 Constance de Powis 1163 Robert de Mohaut 1125 - 1162 Robert de Mohaut 37 37 Robert de Mohaut, of Howarden, succeeded c1141, died c1162, hereditary senschal of the Co of Chester; by Leucha, living 1162, perhaps daughter of William Fitz Neel of Halton, Constable of Cheshire. [Ancestral Roots]

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Built Mold Castle, Flintshire c1140.
1130 - 1162 Leucha FitzNeel 32 32 1155 Eustace de Mohaut 1160 - 1229 Roger de Mohaut 69 69 1087 - 1141 Robert de Mohaut 54 54 Assumed his surname from chief place of residence, an elevation in the co. of Flint, where he erected a castle. Was steward to the Earl of Chester & one of his barons.

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Maude/Monhault (both names being variations of Montalt, itself referring to the hill of Mold, Flintshire, from which the family took on of its titles in the form of Montalt when ennobled). [Burke's Peerage, p. 1342, on Constantine Maude, ancestor of the Viscounts of Hawarden, Tipperary, and descendant of the Mohauts]

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Other names are Mohaut, Monte Alto, and Mowat (Scotland), as well as Maude and Monhault above.
1096 Emma de Delaval 1060 Andomar de Monte Alto 1065 Robert de Delaval 1255 - 1291 Roger de Somery 36 36 Roger de Somery (by (2)), b. 24 June 1255 (age 18 in 1273), Baron Dudley, 1290, held Dinas Powis, d. 11 Oct 1291; m. Agnes, d. 23 Nov 1308. [Ancestral Roots]

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ROGER DE SOMERY, 2nd but 1st surviving son and heir by 2nd wife; born 24 June 1255. On 6 April 1282 he was summoned to Worcester; on 14 March 1282/3 to Montgomery; on 28 July 1283 to Shrewsbury; and on 14 July 1287 to Gloucester. He married Agnes (d), who survived him, and died on or before 23 November 1308. He died on or before 11 October 1291. Complete Peerage XII/1:114

(d) She held in Sulham and Basildon, Berks, but her parentage has not been traced. On 8 Feb 1307/8 she was summoned to attend the Coronation in the train of the King and Queen.
1260 - 1308 Agnes 48 48 1292 - 1327 Joan de Somery 35 35 1225 - 1278 Anabil de Chaucombe 53 53 1357 - 1429 Edmund de Thorpe 72 72 1358 - 1414 Joan de Northwode 56 56 1328 - 1393 Edmund de Thorpe 65 65 EDMUND (DE THORPE), LORD THORPE, brother and heir [of John 3rd Baron de Thorpe, dsp. 23 Oct 1340], born 29 August 1319, was to receive his brother's lands, having done homage, 10 January 1340/1. He was never summoned to Parliament but was Knight of the shire for Norfolk, 1371 (twice), 1379, 1380 and 1384. He fought at Crécy, 26 August 1346, and was at the siege of Calais. With his uncle, Edmund de Hengrave, he was accused, March 1352/3, of having murdered shipwrecked mariners and stolen their goods on 1 November last past. On 20 April 1360 he had protection, being overseas with Lancaster. He was a Commissioner for Norfolk concerning the rights of the Crown in relief and escheat, 1367, and lands held in chief of the King, 1368; a Commissioner there of oyer and terminer frequently from 1367, and of array, 1367 and 1385; Keeper of Norwich Castle and Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, 1369-71; a Commissioner to enforce the Statute of Labourers, 1369, assessor of taxation, 1371 and 1379, and Commissioner de walliis et fossatis, 1388, all in Norfolk; one of the guardians of the temporalities of the Bishopric of Norwich, 22 February--24 October 1385; and was among those appointed to prepare Yarmouth against a possible French invasion, 1386.

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He married, before 1342-43, Joan, sister of Thomas, daughter of Robert BAYNARD (d), of Colkirk and Gateley, Norfolk, by (it would seem) Lucy, daughter and heir of Roger ATTE ESHE [de Fraxinis] of the same. He died shortly before 12 May 1393, when his will was proved in the Consistory Court of Norwich, and was buried at Ashwellthorpe. No Inquisition post mortem remains. His widow died February 1399/1400 at Colkirk, Norfolk, and was buried with him. [Complete Peerage XII/1:722-3]

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(d) He was the son of Robert Baynard, of Hautbois and Wheatacre, Norfolk, who d. shortly before 22 Feb 1329/30, leaving a widow, Maud, and a son and heir Thomas.
1334 Joan Baynard 1328 - 1369 Hugh de Hastings 41 41 Hugh (Sir); allegedly married Margaret de Everingham and dvf 1369. [Burke's Peerage]

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Sir Hugh Hastings, of Elsing, Norfolk. [Burke's Peerage, p. 2299]

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[SIR HUGH DE HASTINGES, next brother [after Sir John de Hastinges, de jure Lord Hastings, dsp 31 Aug 1393] and heir presumptive. He accompanied the Duke of Lancaster in his expedition to Normandy and Brittany in June 1356. He was with the King in his invasion of France in October 1359, being in the retinue of the said Duke. He went to Gascony in December 1366, in the retinue of the Duke of Lancaster, who was taking out reinforcements for the expedition of the Prince of Wales to Castile. He was taken, prisoner by the Spaniards in-a skirmish at Vitoria, 20 March 1366/7, and was ransomed or exchanged in the following autumn. He served with the same Duke in his raid into Picardy and Caux in July 1369. He is said to have married Margaret DE EVER1NGHAM. He died. v.f. it is said in 1369 (g). Her will dated (it is said) 25 November 1375.] [Complete Peerage VI:355, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

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(g) Blomefield says that he died in 1369 at "Kalkwell Hill" (near Calais, where the Duke was encamped in Sep 1369), and was buried in the Friar's Church at Doncaster.

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Hugh d. before his brother John, as well as Hugh's son Hugh, d. 6 Nov 1386. Therefore when Hugh's brother John died without issue in 1393, his title went to Hugh's grandson who was only 9 years old.
1329 - 1375 Margaret de Everingham 46 46 1310 - 1347 Hugh de Hastings 37 37 Hugh (Sir), of Sutton Scotney, Hants; fought at Battle of Sluys 1340; Captain and Lt of English Army in Flanders 1346, fought at Battle of Crecy 1346. [Burke's Peerage]

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SIR HUGH DE HASTINGES, of Sutton Scotney, next brother [after Thomas, dsp 11 Jan 1332/3] and heir, being 2nd son of John, 1st LORD HASTINGES, by his 2nd wife, Isabel, both abovenamed. He was aged 24 and more at his mother's death in 1334. On 28 March 1335 the King took his homage, and he had livery of a moiety of the manor of Sutton Scotney which his mother had held in chief. He fought at the battle of SIUYS, 24 June 1340, in the retinue of the Earl of Derby. On 28 January 1341/2 he had pardon for acquiring for life from Laurence, Earl of Pembroke, the lordship of Oswardebeck, Notts. He was summoned to a Council, 25 February 1341/2, by writ directed Hugoni de Hastinges. On 13 October 1343 he had licence to grant away the
manor of Sutton Scotney. In April 1344 he occurs as Steward to the Queen. He accompanied the Earl of Derby to Gascony in June 1345, being in the retinue of the Earl of Pembroke. On 20 June 1346 he was appointed Captain and Lieutenant of the King in Flanders, and was commissioned to raise forces in that country for the war with France: early in August he brought a large body of Flemings (60,000, it is said) to France, to join the King; and was at the battle of Crécy, 26 August of that year. On 14 May 1347 he was urgentiy requested to rejoin the King before Calais, and was there in the following June.

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He married, before 18 May 1330, Margery, sister and coheir, and in her issue sole heir, of Richard FOLIOT, of Gressenhall and Weasenham, Norfolk, [3rd Lord Foliot] (who died s.p. and a minor, 29 May 1325), and elder daughter of Sir Richard FOLIOT 2nd Lord Foliot], of the same, by Joan, younger daughter and coheir of Sir William DE BREOUSE, Lord of Bramber and Gower [LORD BREOUSE]. On 13 June and 11 December 1330 Hugh and Margery had livery of her purparty of the lands of her
grandmother, Margery, widow of Jordan Foliot. He died 29 or 30 July 1347, and was buried in Elsing Church, Norfolk: brass. The manors, which he and his wife had held jointly at his death, were released to her, Elsing and Weasenham, 7 September 1347, and Norton and Fenwick, 5 October following. She, who was aged 12 or 13 in 1325, died 8 August, and was buried 30 August 1349, in the Furnivalle Chapel, in the Church of the Friars Minor at Doncaster
1313 - 1349 Margery Foliot 36 36 Dau. of Sir Richard Foliot and Joan de Braose; m. Sir Hugh Hastings. [GRS 3.03, Automated Archives, CD#100]

NEWLIN, FOSTER LINE

Dau. of Richard Foliot; m. John de Camoys; mother of Sir Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys. [Burke's, p. 456]
1262 - 1313 John de Hastings 50 50 # Note:

    Sir John de Hastinges, 1st Lord (Baron) Hasting(e)s, so created by writ 24 June 1295 (although in the petition presented by Sir Jacob Astley, Bt in 1840 which resulted in his being called to Parliament as 16th Lord Hastings a date of 29 May 1290 was put forward as constituting the moment when Sir John de Hastinges was first present at an assembly which might be regarded as a Parliament and precedence of this earlier date was assigned the Barony of Hastings; the assembly of 1290 would not now be regarded as a valid Parliament); feudal Lord of Abergavenny; one of three competitors for the Crown of Scotland 1290 in right of his grandmother Ada, Lt and Seneschal of Gascony 1302. [Burke's Peerage]

-------------------------------

    Abergavenny, which of course was only one of William de Cauntelo's possessions passed to Joan's son the 1st Lord (Baron) Hastings and afterwards to his son the 2nd Lord Hastings. The 2nd Lord Hastings' son, the 3rd Lord was created Earl of Pembroke in 1339, but his grandson the 3rd Earl died when still a minor and possession of Abergavenny passed to William Beauchamp. [Burke's Peerage]

--------------------------------

# Note: BARONY OF HASTINGS (I)

# Note:

    SIR JOHN DE HASTINGES, of Abergavenny, son and heir, born 6 May 1262, at Allesley, co. Warwick. On 12 July 1283 the King took his homage, and he had livery of his father's lands, and also of his purparty of the lands of George de Cantelou, namely, the castle and honour of Abergavenny, co. Monmouth, the castle of Kilgerran, co. Pembroke, of the lands of St. Clear, co. Carmarthen, Aston, co. Warwick, Barwick, Little Marston, and Stoford, Somerset, and Badmondisfield, Suffolk. In January 1283/4 he was about to go to Scotland. He was on the King's service in Wales in 1287. In 1292 he claimed a third part of the Kingdom of Scotland, as grandson and heir of Ada, 3rd daughter and coheir of David, Earl of Huntingdon: his claim was rejected by the judgment delivered at Berwick Castle, on Monday after St. Martin [17 November]. In January 1296/7 he was about to go to Brabant, by the King's command, in attendance on Margaret, the King's daughter, Duchess of Brabant. He was in the Army of Scotland in 1300, being at the siege of Carlaverock in July the same year. On 2 February 1300/1 he had licence to crenellate his manor and town of Fillongley, co. Warwick. He was summoned for Military Service from 26 June 1294 to 18 June 1310 to attend the Coronation, 18 January 1307/8, to a Council 8 January 1308/9, and to Parliament from 24 June 1295 to 8 July 1312, by writs directed Johanni de Hastingges, and moreover is recorded to have been present in pleno parliamento domini Regis on the morrow of Trinity 29 May 1290 with other magnates et proceres tunc in parliamento existentes, whereby he is held to have become LORD HASTINGES. As Johannes de Hastinges Dominus de Bergeveni he took part in the Barons' Letter to the Pope, 12 February 1300/1. On 23 August 1302 he was appointed Lieutenant and Seneschal of Gascony, during pleasure: he held the office till August or September 1304. On 22 May 1306 the King granted to him and his heirs the county of Menteith (except the land in that county which the King had previously granted to Edmund de Hastinges, forfeited by Alan, late Earl of Menteith, the King's rebel and enemy. On 15 March 1308/9 he had licence to grant, in fee, to John, his son, the manor of Aston Cantlow, the castle and town of Kilgerran, and other lands in Wales. He was re-appointed Lieutenant and Seneschal of Gascony, 24 October 1309, during pleasure, and on 16 November following had licence to set out from Dover with his household, horses, armour, silver vessels, &c.; he surrendered his office in the latter half of 1311.

# Note:

    He married, 1stly, at Braxted, Essex, or Blunham, Beds, Isabel, daughter of William DE VALENCE, sometimes styled EARL OF PEMBROKE, by Joan, daaughter of Sir Warin DE MUNCHANESY, of Swanscombe, Kent, Winfarthing and Gooderstone, Norfolk, &c. She died 5 October 1305, and was buried in Coventry Priory. He married, 2ndly, Isabel, daughter of Hugh (LE DESPENSER), EARL OF WINCHESTER, by Isabel, daughter of William (DE BEAUCHAMP), EARL OF WARWICK. He died 20 February 1312/3. His widow had livery of her dower, 11 April 1313, and of the knights' fees and advowsons of her dower, 20 November following, all of which had been assigned her by the King. She married, 2ndly, as 2nd wife, Sir RALPH DE MOUNTHERMER, sometime EARL OF GLOUCESTER: as royal licence had not been obtained for this marriage, on 20 November 1318 and again on 2 January following, the lands they held in dower were taken into the King's hand. They were pardoned and their lands were restored to them, 12 August 1319, for a fine of 1,000 marks: which also they were pardoned on 18 May 1321. She had charge of two of the King's daughters from Michaelmas 1324. Ralph died 5 April 1325, and was buried in the Church of the Grey Friars at Salisbury, aged 63. She died 4 or 5 December 1334. [Complete Peerage VI:346-9, XIV:372

# Note:

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 93a-29

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 12

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: VI:346-9
1290 - 1334 Isabel le Despencer 44 44 He [John de Hastinges] married, 2ndly, Isabel, daughter of Hugh (LE DESPENSER), EARL OF WINCHESTER, by Isabel, daughter of William (DE BEAUCHAMP), EARL OF WARWICK. He died 20 February 1312/3. His widow had livery of her dower, 11 April 1313, and of the knights' fees and advowsons of her dower, 20 November following, all of which had been assigned her by the King. She married, 2ndly, as 2nd wife, Sir RALPH DE MOUNTHERMER, sometime EARL OF GLOUCESTER: as royal licence had not been obtained for this marriage, on 20 November 1318 and again on 2 January following, the lands they held in dower were taken into the King's hand. They were pardoned and their lands were restored to them, 12 August 1319, for a fine of 1,000 marks: which also they were pardoned on 18 May 1321. She had charge of two of the King's daughters from Michaelmas 1324. Ralph died 5 April 1325, and was buried in the Church of the Grey Friars at Salisbury, aged 63. She died 4 or 5 December 1334.
1283 - 1317 Richard Foliot 33 33 1284 Joan de Braose 1294 Joan Foliot 1249 - 1299 Jordan Foliot 50 50 SIR JORDAN FOLIOT, of Gressenhall, Elsing, East Lexham, and Weasenham, Norfolk, Norton, Fenwick, Moseley, and Cowesby, co. York, Grimston and Wellow, Notts, son and heir of Sir Richard FOLIOT, of Norton, Fenwick, Grimston, and Wellow (who died in Mar. 1299), by Margery, sister and in her issue heir of Sir Robert D'ESTUTEVILLE, of Gressenhall, Elsing, East Lexham, Weasenham, and Cowesby, and daughter of Sir William D'ESTUTEVILLE, of the same. He was about to go to Wales on the King's
service in July 1277, and was ordered to join the Army of Scotland under the Earl of Surrey, 24 September 1297. He was summoned for Military Service from 12 December 1276 to 30 March 1298, to attend the King at Salisbury, 26 January 1296/7, to a Military Council, 16 September 1297, and to Parliament from 24 June 1295 to 2 November 1295, by writs directed Jordano Foliot or Folyot, whereby he is held to have become LORD FOLIOT.

---

He married Margery, daughter of Sir Adam DE NEUMARCHE, of Womersley, Campsall, Bentley, &c., co. York. He died shortly before 2 May 1299, aged 50 and more. His widow had livery of the manors of Grimston and Wellow, of which she and her husband had been jointly enfeoffed, 17 September 1299. She obtained., for a similar reason, the manors of Norton and Fenwick, and held the manors of Elsing and East Lexham, in dower. She died 18 April 1330, and was buried in Wendling Abbey. [CP 5:757-8]
1255 - 1330 Margery de Neumarche 75 75 1214 - 1298 Richard Foliot 84 84 Sir Richard FOLIOT, of Norton, Fenwick, Grimston, and Wellow (who died in Mar. 1299), by Margery, sister and in her issue heir of Sir Robert D'ESTUTEVILLE, of Gressenhall, Elsing, East Lexham, Weasenham, and Cowesby, and daughter of Sir William D'ESTUTEVILLE, of the same. [Complete Peerage V:238-9]
1229 Margery de Stuteville 1270 Walter Foliot 1190 - 1225 Jordan Foliot 35 35 Jordan Foliot, living 1225, of Norton, co. York, and Frisby, co. Lincoln, son & heir of Richard Foliot, of Norton, & Beatrice or Cecily Bardolf, daughter & heir in her issue of Hugh Bardolf, d. c 1176, of Waddington, co. Lincoln, & Isabel de Condet. [Ancestral Roots]
1214 Beatrice Foliot 1165 Beatrice Bardolf 1160 Richard Foliot Richard Foliot, of Norton, & Beatrice or Cecily Bardolf, daughter & heir in her issue of Hugh Bardolf, d. c 1176, of Waddington, co. Lincoln, & Isabel de Condet. [Ancestral Roots]
1180 Hawise Foliot 1135 Jordan Foliot 1085 - 1145 William Foliot 60 60 Agnes de Arches and Herbert de St Quintin had at least three children Alice, Walter and Alan. Walter and Alan predeceased their mother as shown by a gift dated 1144-55 to the nuns at Nunkeeling, which establishment she founded, "pro salute anime domini mei Herberti de Sancto Quintino et pro animabus Walteri et Alani filiorum meorum." [Farrer. EYC v.3 p.53]. She does not appear to be mother of Richard de St Quintin, Herbert's son and heir.

Agnes is referred to Alice's mother in a gift made to Nunkeeling by the latter between 1164-1170. Alice married Robert son of Fulk the Steward and secondly Eustace de Merc. She appears to have at least four children by her first husband William, Walter, Henry, and Sybil.

By her second marriage to Robert de Fauconberg, she was mother of Piers/Peter, his son and heir; and by her marriage to William Foliot she was mother of William and Hugh Foliot. This is shown by the confirmation by William, archbishop of York, dated 1143-1154, of a gift made by her to Nunkeeling by "petitione Agnetis matris Petri de Falcamberga et filiorum suorum Willelmi et Hugonis Foliot" [Farrer.EYC v.3 p.54]
1086 - 1164 Agnes de Arches 78 78 gift dated 1144-55 to the nuns at Nunkeeling, which establishment she founded, "pro salute anime domini mei Herberti de Sancto Quintino et pro animabus Walteri et Alani filiorum meorum." [Farrer. EYC v.3 p.53].

Agnes is referred to as Alice's mother in a gift made to Nunkeeling by the latter between 1164-1170
1188 William de Stuteville 1188 - 1242 Margaret de Say 54 54 <1145 - 1173 Osmund de Stuteville 28 28 1200 Isabel de Gressenhall 1175 William FitzRobert de Gressenhall 1150 Roger FitzWilliam de Gressenhall 1125 William FitzRoger de Gressenhall 1100 Roger FitzWimer de Gressenhall 1075 Wimer 1168 Hugh de Say HUGH DE SAY, son and heir [of Hugh by Lucy de Clifford]. He was keeper of Norton Castle, in what is now co. Radnor, and fought under Richard I in Normandy in 1194. In 1195 he was in charge of the castle of Bleddfa in the March, now co. Radnor. In 1196 he and Roger de Mortimer of Wigmore were defeated near Radnor by the Welsh prince Rhys.

---

He married Mabel, daughter of Robert MARMION. He was assessed to the third scutage of the army in Normandy in 1196, and seems to have been living in the early part of 1197, but died s.p.m., before Michaelmas that year. His widow Mabel by Easter 1201 was married to Reynold [---]. She was dead before Michaelmas 1210. Complete Peerage IX:258
1169 - 1210 Mabel Marmion 41 41 1197 Hugh FitzHugh de Say 1136 - 1190 Hugh de Say 54 54 1141 Lucia de Clifford 1100 Hugh FitzOsborn 1107 Eustache de Say 1045 - 1086 William de Say 41 41 Picot, who was a substantial under-tenant of Earl Roger of Montgomery at Clun and elsewhere in Shropshire, is shown by the devolution of his lands to have been Picot de Say. Robert, Abbot of St-Martin de Sees granted the privilege of burial to Robert and Henry their sons; and in return Picot (as he is henceforth called) and his wife gave to the abbey "edificium matris Picot cum virgulto quod habebat juxta ecclesiam sancte Marie de Vrou" and confirmed a third of the church of Sai which Osmelinus de Sayo gave at the same time, giving also meadow land in the meadows "de Juvigneio"; the charter is subscribed by Earl Roger, Picot and his wife and two sons. "Vrou" is clearly Urou, the next parish to Sai, and Juvigni the parish immediately south of Sai. An agreement was made on 17 May 1086 in the court of Robert de Belleme between Picot de Saio and Droco de Coimis as to the dower which Droco's brother William had given to Adeloia his wife, who had been remarried to Picot. This is further evidence of Picot's tenure under the house of Montgomery-Belleme, and suggests that the charter to St-Martin de Sees was considerably later than 1060, the date to which it has been assigned. [Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families]
1074 Theodore de Say 1307 - 1388 Adam de Everingham 81 81 ADAM (DF EVERINGHAM), LORD EVERINGHAM, son and heir, by 1st wife, born about 1307. He was at the siege of Berwick, March to July 1333, at the battle of Halidon Hill, 19 July 1333, with the King at Antwerp, 1338-39, at the battle of Sluys, 24 June 1340, and at the siege of Tournay July to September following. The King took his homage for the manor of Laxton, and his fealty for the manor of North Leverton, which manors his father had held for life, and he had livery thereof, 13 June 1341. He was taken prisoner in France, before 14 May 1342, and was ransomed for 200 marks in gold. He was in France, in the retinue of the Earl of Derby in September following, and in Gascony, in the retinue of the same Earl, 1345-46, at the siege of Calais in 1347, in the retinue of the Earl of Lancaster, and was about to go to France, in the same retinue, in 1348 and 1355. Having been indicted of divers trespasses, he was detained in gaol at Nottingham Castle in August 1351. He was present when Edward Balliol made over the Kingdom of Scotland to Edward III in January 1355/6, and accompanied the King in his invasion of France in October 1359, being with the King before Paris in April 1360. He was summoned to a Council, 20 March 1349/50, and to Parliament, 8 January 1370/1, by writs directed Ade de Everyngham de Laxton'.

---

He married, before 16 May 1332, Joan, daughter of Sir John DEIVILLE, of Egmanton and Adlingfleet, by his 2nd wife, Margaret. She, who inherited Egmanton, died 10 years or more before him. He died 8 February 1387/8, at Laxton, aged about 80. Complete Peerage V:189-90

---

Adam de Everingham, 2nd baron, was summoned to parliament as "Adæ de Everingham de Laxton," 8 January, 1371. This nobleman, who was several years actively engaged in the French wars, shred in the glory of Cressy. His lordship m. Joan, dau. of John Deyville and d. 9 February, 2nd Richard II [1379], having had issue, William and Reginald. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 193, Everingham, Barons Everingham]
1315 - 1377 Joan Deiville 62 62 1337 William de Everingham 1348 Joan de Everingham 1335 Thomas de Everingham 1281 Adam de Everingham 1282 Clarince 1256 - 1287 Robert de Everingham 31 31 1252 - 1326 Alice de la Hyde 74 74 1226 Adam de Everingham 1205 Robert de Everingham 1209 - 1252 Isabel de Birkin 43 43 1166 - 1227 John de Birkin 61 61 1166 Joan de Lenvenlise 1136 Adam FitzPeter 1134 - 1224 Maud de Cauz 90 90 1110 Peter FitzAssulf 1110 Emma de Lascelles 1106 Robert de Caus 1118 - 1185 Sibyl Basset 67 67 1144 Margaret de Cauz 1076 - 1130 Walter de Caus 54 54 1080 Anneis 1045 Robert de Caus 1050 Gasilea de Normanville 1021 Walter de Caus 1095 - 1144 Richard Basset 49 49 Richard Basset, Justiciar temp. Henry I, who held Drayton through his marriage with Maud Ridel, and d. 1144. [Complete Peerage II:1 note (b)]

---

Richard Basset, called the eldest son by Dugdale and the 2nd by others, succeeded his father as Justice of England, which high office he filled in the latter part of King Henry I's reign and through the whole of King Stephen's. In the 5th year of the latter monarch [1140], he was sheriff of Surrey, Cambridge, and Huntingdonshire, with Aleric de Vere, and he served the same office for Essex, Hertford, Buckingham, Bedford, Norfolk, Suffolk, Northampton, and Leicestershires. He m. Maud, only dau. and heir of Geoffrey Ridel, Lord of Witheringe, by Geva, dau. of Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester, and had issue, Geoffrey, Ralph, and William. He was s. by his eldest son, Geoffrey de Ridel, who, from his mother, assumed the surname "de Ridel." [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 26, Basset, Barons Basset, of Welden]
1097 - 1139 Matilda de Ridel 42 42 1131 Ralph Basset 1126 Geoffrey Basset 1134 William Basset 1136 Jordan Basset 1165 - 1234 Miles Basset 69 69 1075 - 1120 Geoffrey de Ridel 45 45 (a) In Dugdale's "Usage of Arms", are given the numerous variations (for the sake of "difference") in the armorial ensigns borne by the various members of the Basset family. From this it would appear that the house of Weldon, and that of Drayton, both of whom derived from the elder sons of Richard Basset by Maud, daughter and heir of Geoffrey Ridel (a powerful feudal Baron, whose lands they inherited), adopted the "3 piles" (the Ridel coat), but that William Basset (ancestor of the house of Sapcote, being the youngest son of the said William and Maud), "having no advancement by the house of Rydell, retained "Undie" the devise of the Bassets, and only changed the colours thereof (from gold and red) into silver and black. But, about the time of Edward III, Simon Basset, Baron of Sapcote (descended from the forenamed William) and Sir John Basset of Blore (also so descended), both of them (I know not the case why) at one instant (as I think) relinquished
their devise of "Undie" and invested themselves into "Ridels" (ie. the 3 piles with certain variations). [G.E. Cokayne] J. H. Round, however points out that all this is invalidated by the fact that Geoffrey Ridel d. as early as 1120, when there cannot have existed a family coat of Ridel. [Vicary Gibbs] [Complete Peerage II:1 note (a)]
1076 Geva d'Avranches 1044 - 1098 Geoffrey Ridel 54 54 1048 de Bigot 1092 Hawise de Ridel 1017 - 1075 Geoffrey Taillefer (de Ridel) 58 58 1018 Agnes de Perigord 1174 Jordan de Lenvenlise 1174 Cecily Arundel 1222 Robert de la Hyde 1233 Cecily Walerand 1258 Joan de la Hyde 1276 - 1325 John Deiville 49 49 1276 - 1341 Margaret 65 65 1253 - 1291 John Deiville 38 38 Aspilogia III gives a modern blazon of the arms of John Deiville senior (normalized spelling): Or, a fess gules, semy of fleurs-de-lis counterchanged. The biographical entry reads as follows:

"John Deiville of Egmanton, Notts., s. and h. of Robert Deiville, rebelled against the king but pardoned, 1267, king's banneret,summoned to serve against the Welsh, 1277, 1282 and 1283, d. 1291,leaving s. and h. John (d. 1326; ... )."
1255 - 1276 Maud 21 21 1205 Robert Daiville 1214 - 1242 Dionise FitzWilliam 28 28 1171 - 1242 John de Daiville 71 71 1168 Maud de Louvain de Percy 1150 - 1190 Robert de Daiville 40 40 Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 4: Deiville (PROPOSED CORRECTIONS)
Index

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DEIVILLE
Volume 4, page 131, note a:
John [de Daiville (living 1228)] was s. and h. of Robert (by Julian, his wife, living in Aug. 1202) ...

Rosie Bevan, in September 2002, provided evidence identifying Robert's wife as Julian de Montfort, daughter of Thurstan de Montfort by Julian Murdac, daughter of Geoffrey Murdac [citing Curia Regis Rolls, vol. 9, p. 291; Early Yorkshire Charters, vol. 9, no. 17].

[This evidence was communicated by John P. Ravilious.]
1155 Juliana de Montfort 1129 Robert de Daiville 1195 - 1242 Thomas FitzWilliam 47 47 Sir Thomas Fitz-William m. Agnes, one of the daus. and co-heirs of Roger Bertram, feudal lord of Mitford, by whom he had three sons, William, his successor; Sir Roger, who had the lands of Woodhall from his father; and Peter, who was settled at Deney. He had, besides, five daughters, Margaret, Agnes, Bertha, Rometa, and Alberda, m. Sir Richard Walleis, Knt., of Burgh Walleis. Sir Thomas Fitz-William was s. by his eldest son, Sir William Fitz-William. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 215, Fitz-William, Baron Fitz-William]
1212 Agnes Bertram 1232 William FitzWilliam 1173 William FitzWilliam The son of this marriage [William & Aubrey], William FitzWilliam (the alleged Marshal of Hastings [which he was not]) was probably just of age in 1194, when, by a fine dated 21 Apr, Roger the Constable, Aubrey's grandson by her first husband, released to her and her son William (FitzWilliam) all the lands which had belonged to Robert de Lisours her father. The subsequent pedigree can be sketched very briefly. Aubrey's son William FitzWilliam, was living 9 Feb 1218/9. [Complete Peerage V:518-519 Note]

---

This feudal lord took up arms in the baronial cause, temp. King John, but returned to his allegiance in the 5th Henry III [1221]. He m. Ella, dau. of Hamlyn, Earl Warren and Surrey, and was s. by his son, Sir Thomas Fitz-William. [Sir Bernard
Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 215, Fitz-William, Baron Fitz-William]
1164 Ela Warren 1128 - 1193 Albreda de Lisoures 65 65 He [William FitzGodric] married, probably about 1169-70, as her third husband, Aubrey, daughter and heir of Robert de Lisours (son of Fulk de Lisours, the Domesday tenant of Sprotborough and other West Riding manors under Roger de Busli), who married, about 1129-30, Aubrey, daughter of Robert de Lacy, lord of Pontefract, and in her issue heir of the great Lacy estates on the death of Robert de Lacy II, 1193-4. Aubrey de Lisours was therefore a great heiress through both parents. She married (1) Robert FitzEustace, c 1150, by whom she had issue John the Constable of Chester (died 1190, from whom the 2nd house of Lacy descended); (2) William de Clairfait, c 1167; and (3) William FitzGodric, c 1169-70. [Complete Peerage V:518 Note]
1140 - 1194 William FitzGodric 54 54 William son of Godric was probably born about 1140; he occurs in the Pipe Rolls from 1169-70 to 1179-80, and was dead in 1194. He married, probably about 1169-70, as her third husband, Aubrey, daughter and heir of Robert de Lisours (son of Fulk de Lisours, the Domesday tenant of Sprotborough and other West Riding manors under Roger de Busli), who married, about 1129-30, Aubrey, daughter of Robert de Lacy, lord of Pontefract, and in her issue heir of the great Lacy estates on the death of Robert de Lacy II, 1193-4. Aubrey de Lisours was therefore a great heiress through both parents. She married (1) Robert FitzEustace, c 1150, by whom she had issue John the Constable of Chester (died 1190, from whom the 2nd house of Lacy
descended); (2) William de Clairfait, c 1167; and (3) William FitzGodric, c 1169-70. [Complete Peerage V:518 Note]

---

Sir William Fitz-William, lord of Elmley and Sprotborough, m. Albreda, dau. and heir of Robert de Lizures, widow of Richard Fitz-Eustace, constable of Chester, and sister of the half blood to Robert de Laci, Baron of Pontefract, and had issue, a dau. Donatia, to whom her other gave lands in Crowle, with a son, Sir William Fitz-William, his successor. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 215, Fitz-William, Baron Fitz-William]
1170 FitzWilliam 1115 Godric FitzKetelborn Note [CP V:518, just after the text concerning William FitzWilliam, d. bef. 1342]: The following information has been supplied by Mr. W. Paley Balidon, F.S.A., who has made a special study of the Yorkshire FitzWilliams. For a well-documented pedigree of the main line down to the death of Sir John FitzWilliam of Emley in 1417, see "Baildon and the Baildons."

The family of FitzWilliam, notwithstanding the Norman form of the name, is certainly of Anglian or Scandinavian descent. The story of William FitzGodric, cousin to Edward the Confessor, and his son William FitzWilliam, "Ambassador at the court of William, Duke of Normandy," and Marshal of the Norman army at Hastings, is obviously mythical, as is the story of the Conqueror's scarf, even if the scarf is seen today. [Bridges, "Northants", says that the first William FitzWilliam was a "natural son to the Conqueror"!] William, son of Godric is , however, a real person, but he flourished a century and more after the Conquest. Godric's father was named Ketelborn; in a lawsuit in 1211 he is said to have been seised of land at Hopton, not far from Emley, on the day of the death of Henry I, 1 Dec 1135. Godric was probably born about 1110-1115; there is no direct record of him.

William son of Godric was probably born about 1140; he occurs in the Pipe Rolls from 1169-70 to 1179-80, and was dead in 1194. He married, probably about 1169-70, as her third husband, Aubrey, daughter and heir of Robert de Lisours (son of Fulk de Lisours, the Domesday tenant of Sprotborough and other West Riding manors under Roger de Busli), who married, about 1129-30, Aubrey, daughter of Robert de Lacy, lord of Pontefract, and in her issue heir of the great Lacy estates on the death of Robert de Lacy II, 1193-4. Aubrey de Lisours was therefore a great heiress through both parents. She married (1) Robert FitzEustace, c 1150, by whom she had issue John the Constable of Chester (died 1190, from whom the 2nd house of Lacy
descended); (2) William de Clairfait, c 1167; and (3) William FitzGodric, c 1169-70.
[Complete Peerage V:518 Note]

---

The following citation is part of the "obviously mythical" ancestry.

Sir William Fitz-William, who was living in 1117, Lord of Elmley and Sprotborough, m. Ella, dau. and co-heir of William, Earl of Warren and Surrey, and had Roger, to whom the Earl of Warren gave the lordship of Gretewell, and Sir William Fit-William, an elder son, his successor. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 215, Fitz-William, Baron Fitz-William]
1090 Ketelborn 1120 William Warren 1120 Isabelle de Warrene 1294 - 1329 Robert de Thorpe 35 35 1306 Beatrix de Hengrave 1267 - 1324 John de Thorpe 57 57 1270 Agnes 1234 - 1284 Robert FitzJohn de Thorpe 50 50 1205 John de Thorpe 1210 Margery de Creke 1268 Thomas Edmund de Hengrave 1267 Isabel Calthorpe 1241 - 1306 William de Calthorpe 65 65 William de Burnham dying without issue, in the reign of Henry III, this lordship came to Sir William De Calthorp, by his marriage with the sister and heir, Cecilia, as may be seen in Harpley.

http://www.burnhamclan.org/html/general_history_tp.html

Blomefield's History of Norfolk 
1245 Celia de Burnham 1269 Walter Calthorpe 1220 Roger de Calthorpe 1194 - 1257 Walter de Calthorpe 63 63 1169 - 1193 William de Calthorpe 24 24 1126 William Alto de Calthorpe 1093 - 1135 Herman de Alto Dapifer 42 42 1055 - 1087 Goderic Dapifer 32 32 (h) The Inquest as to Knights Fees in 1212 found that Willelmus de Monte Caniso tenuit Gurtreston . . . et fruit quondam dominicum Regis, et data fuit antecessoribus predicti Willemi per Henricum Regem avum domini Regis (a not uncommon description of Henry I in official records of the time of King John). This seems to purport rather that land, which had been Godric's, passed to the Munchensy family than that Hubert, son of Godric, who witnessed a lease to his brother Ralph, 1134-40, assumed the name of Munchensy as has been supposed. Godric dapifer - ie. steward - held in 1086 many lands in Norfolk and Suffolk both in fee of the Crown and as the King's steward, including Gooderstone (Gurreston), Wramplingham,
Winfarthing and Rockland; Bergh and Appleton he held of the Bishop of Ely, and had a lease of Little Melton from the abbey of St Benet Hulme; in Essex he was in charge of Great Sampford for the King. He was a prominent figure in East Anglia already in 1080, and in 1087 and later was sheriff of Norfolk and (or) Suffolk. In many of his Domesday holdings his predecessor in 1066 had been Edwin, Teinus dominicus regis Edwardi, who, with his wife Ingrid, had given Little Melton to St Benet. The fact of Godric's thus succeeding to the lands of Edwin, coupled with the name of his wife - also Ingrid - suggests that Godric had married the daughter of the pre-Conquest holder. Godric and his wife also gave Little Melton to St Benet; and Ralph, son of Godric, and his wife Letseline, and, after his death, his widow Basile, held leases of that manor from the abbey for their lives. The lease of Basile, interpreted in the terms of that to Ralph, proves that he must have dsp. The cartulary also records the names of Ralph's brother Eudo and nephew Lisewy. [Complete Peerage IX:411 note (h)]
1067 Lescila 1219 Philip de Burnham 1220 Emma le Strange 1190 William de Burnham 1165 Philip de Burnham 1125 Matthew de Burnham 1100 William de Burnham 1075 Veutre de Burnham 1040 Walter le Veutre de Burnham 1198 Ralph le Strange 1169 - 1199 Guy le Strange 30 30 1292 Robert Baynard 1296 Lucy Atte Eshe 1264 - 1329 Robert Baynard 65 65 1265 Maud 1328 - 1378 John de Northwode 50 50 John de Northwode, 3rd Lord Northwode, d. 27 Feb 1378/9; m. 1350 Joan, daughter of Robert Hert of Faversham. She was living Sep 1398. [Magna Charta Sureties]

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BARONY OF NORTHWODE (III)

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JOHN (DE NORTHWODE), LORD NORTHWODE, son and heir by ist wife. He had a writ for livery of his inheritance in December 1361. He served in France in 1355 and 1359. He was summoned to Parliament from 1 June 1363 to 28 December 1375. In 1369 he was joint commissioner to muster all men-at-arms, &c., whose duty it was to serve for the defence of Sheppey, and in 1377 was directed to repair and abide there, with all his power, for the safeguard of the island from French invasion.

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He married, in 1350, Joan, daughter of Robert HERT, of Faversham. He died 27 February 1378/9. His widow was living in September 1398. No further summonses to Parliament were issued to this family.
1330 Joan Hert 1307 - 1361 Roger de Northwode 54 54 Roger de Northwode, 2nd Lord Northwode, b. 1307/8, age 12 Easter 1319, d. 5 Nov 1361. [Magna Charta Sureties]

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BARONY OF NORTHWODE (II)

ROGER (DE NORTHWODE), LORD NORTHWODE, grandson and heir, being son and heir of John DE NORTHWODE, by Agnes his wife. He was aged 12 at Easter 1319. His wardship and marriage were sold for 700 marks to Bartholomew de Badlesmere [Lord Badlesmere]. Roger did homage, and had a writ of livery of his inheritance, 28 April 1327, and had respite from taking up knighthood, June 1333. He was summoned, December 1334, for service in Scotland, and in 1339 was chief of those appointed to provide for the defence of Sheppey against invasion. In 1355 he was joint keeper of the ports and sea coast of Kent, in 1360 one of the arrayers of men-at-arms, &c., in the county, and in 1361 a commissioner of the peace there. He was summoned to Parliament 3 April 1360.

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He married, 1stly, Juliane or Julienne, daughter of Geoffrey (DE SAY), LORD SAY, by Idoine, daughter of William (DE LEYBURN), LORD LEYBURN. She died 20 February 1329. He married 2ndly, soon after 25 June 1331, Elizabeth, widow of Richard FOLIOT [3rd LORD FOLIOT], and daughter of John DE SEGRAVE (le oncle), by Julienne, daughter and heir of Sir John DE SANDWIZ. She died s.p., 11 December 1335, at Canterbury, and was buried in Sheppey. M.L He married, 3rdly, Margery, widow of Sir Nicholas DE HAGHTON (died 1338), of Ockendon, Essex. She died after an accident, 31 December 1340. He married, 4thly, soon after Easter 1342, Joan, widow of Thomas DE FAVERSHAM of Graveney. She died May 1356. He married, 5thly, 1 August following, Agnes, widow of Sir John DE COBHAM. He died 5 November 1361. His widow married, 3rdly, Christopher SHUCKBURGH, of co. Warwick, and died 27 May 1405.
1308 - 1328 Juliana de Say 20 20 1287 - 1348 Agnes de Grandison 61 61 He [John de Northwode] married Agnes, daughter and [eventually in her issue] coheir of William GRANDISON [LORD GRANDISON], by Sibyl, younger daughter and coheir of Sir John TREGOZ [LORD TREGOZ]. He died v.p., before 8 September 1318. His widow was one of her father's executors, and died 4 December 1348.]

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Note: Note: William Grandison had another daughter Agnes by his first wife, who m. Thomas Bardolf; but she was obviously a different Agnes because her death date was different (11 Dec 1357).
1275 - 1318 John de Northwode 43 43 [JOHN DE NORTHWODE, son and heir apparent, was summoned for military service against the Scots in 1298 and later years to 1317, and was associated with his father as above. He and his wife were summoned to the Coronation of Edward II. In 1311 he led the foot-soldiers raised in Kent to Roxburgh.

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He married Agnes, daughter and [eventually in her issue] coheir of William GRANDISON [LORD GRANDISON], by Sibyl, younger daughter and coheir of Sir John TREGOZ [LORD TREGOZ]. He died v.p., before 8 September 1318. His widow was one of her father's executors, and died 4 December 1348.]
1254 - 1319 John de Northwode 64 64 JOHN DE NORTHWODE, son and heir, was aged 31 at his father's death. In 1278 he was in the household of Robert Kilwardby, Archbishop of Canterbury; he did homage, and had a writ for livery of his inheritance, 10 December 1285. In 1290 he was chamberlain of Milton; sheriff of Kent, 1291-93, 1299-1300, 1304--06; and in 1291 and 1292 commissioner of oyer and terminer, and justice in Kent. He was summoned, 8 June 1294, with about 60 others, to advise the King upon urgent affairs of the realm; and on 14 June was excepted from service in the King's expedition to Gascony. He was summoned for military service abroad in 1297; and in 1298 and subsequent years in Scotland. He was present at the siege of Carlaverock in 1300, where he
was knighted by Edward I. In 1305 he served as assessor of the fifteenth in the Cinque Ports, was a keeper of the peace in Kent, 1307, and a justice for gaol delivery, 1308, in which year he and his wife were summoned to the Coronation of Edward II. He was summoned to Parliament from 8 January 1312/3 to 20 March 1318/9, by writs directed Johanni de Northwode, whereby he is held to have become LORD NORTHWODE. In June 1317, with his son John and 6 other Kentish notables, he proceeded to Dover to meet the cardinals sent to England at the King's request to negotiate peace between England and Scotland, and to escort them to London.

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He married (query about 1275) Joan DE BADLESMERE (h). He died 26 May 1319, and his widow 2 June following; they were buried in Minster church. [Complete Peerage IX:754-5]

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(h) Called in NGR. lady of the manors of Horton near Canterbury and Bewsfield (otherwise Whitfield) near Dover. These appear in her Inq.p.m. Hasted says she was daughter of Guncelin (Joscelin) de Badlesmere, who gave these manors with her in free marriage to John de Northwode. No deed of such gift has been found, but John was said to hold 10 marks rents in Harrietsham of the gift of Guncelin. Her age would make it likely that Joan was sister, not daughter, of Guncelin.
1255 Joan de Badlesmere He [John de Northwode] married (query about 1275) Joan DE BADLESMERE (h). He died 26 May 1319, and his widow 2 June following; they were buried in Minster church.

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(h) Called in NGR. lady of the manors of Horton near Canterbury and Bewsfield (otherwise Whitfield) near Dover. These appear in her Inq.p.m. Hasted says she was daughter of Guncelin (Joscelin) de Badlesmere, who gave these manors with her in free marriage to John de Northwode. No deed of such gift has been found, but John was said to hold 10 marks rents in Harrietsham of the gift of Guncelin. Her age would make it likely that Joan was sister, not daughter, of Guncelin.
1215 - 1285 Roger de Northwode 70 70 ROGER DE NORTHWODE, son and heir, a minor at his father's death, was given in custody to Robert de St. John, and was of age in 1247. In 1257 he had licence to hold lands inherited from his father, and otherwise acquired, in Sheppey, Upchurch, Iwade, Bobbing, Newington and Milton, by knight service instead of by gavelkind. As chief executor of Reynold de Cobham, who died sheriff of Kent, he was in charge of Dover Castle prior to 8 January 1257/8, and presented the accounts of the shrievalty for the first half of the year 1257-58. In September 1265, by which time he was a knight, he was a commissioner in Kent to take lands of the rebels into the King's hand, and was in and from that year Steward of the Archbishop of Canterbury. A justice to deliver Canterbury gaol, in 1269, and in 1275 and later a commissioner as to debts and affairs of the Jews there. From 1275 or 1276 till his death he was a Baron of the Exchequer, and member of many commissions, including in 1277 and 1280 those for Rochester bridge.

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He married Bone (called also Bonnefille, Bonafilia), sister and heir of John, son of Henry DE WALTHAM, who brought him the manors of Shorne and Thornham. He died 9 November 1285.
1230 - 1286 Bone de Waltham 56 56 1202 Henry de Waltham 1178 - 1231 Stephen de Northwode 53 53 STEPHEN of Jordan of Sheppey (de Scapeia), by Cicely his wife, held, by grant of Richard I and confirmation of John, the manor of Northwood, in Milton. He married, 1stly, Fedive, widow of John, son of Gilbert DE LANDRIES, from whom she had dower in Surrey. She was living 1213-14. He married, 2ndly, Joan (----), and died shortly before 21 April 1231
1178 Joan 1145 - 1198 Jordan de Sheppey 53 53 STEPHEN, son of Jordan of Sheppey (de Scapeia), by Cicely his wife (c), held, by grant of Richard I and confirmation of John, the manor of Northwood, in Milton. He married, 1stly, Fedive, widow of John, son of Gilbert DE LANDRIES, from whom she had dower in Surrey. She was living 1213-14. He married, 2ndly, Joan (----), and died shortly before 21 April 1231. [CP 9:753]

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(c) Cicely gave to the church of Rochester a window to the altar of St. Peter, etc., and, with consent of her sons William and Stephen, confirmed a rent of 12d. given by her father Wimar. She was living in 1198, when assessed to the tallage of the vill of Milton (next Sittingbourne) 40 marks; Stephen her son, 5 marks; William his brother, 10 marks.

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Based on note (c), CP concludes that Stephen was probably a younger brother to William.
1150 - 1198 Cecily 48 48 1125 Wimar 1281 - 1322 Geoffrey de Say 41 41 1283 - 1322 Idonea de Leybourne 39 39 1310 Katherine de Say 1253 - 1295 William de Saye 41 41 William; born 20 Nov 1253; summoned to serve against Welsh 1277, 1282 and 1283, also to an embryonic form of Parliament 1283; married Elizabeth and died by 16 Sep 1295. [Burke's Peerage]

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William de Say IV, probably by 2nd wife (stated without evidence), b. 20 Nov 1253, d. on or bef. 16 Sep 1295; m. Elizabeth, who survived him. [Magna Charta Sureties]

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WILLIAM DE SAY IV, son and heir, was born 20 November 1253. The wardship of his father's lands and heir had been granted by the King to Poncius de Mora, King's merchant, in discharge of the King's debts to him; but by September 1273 William had bought the custody of the lands. On 27 July 1276 he was granted protection, being about to go to Ireland for 3 years. In 1277 he was summoned to be at Worcester on 1 July to serve in person against Llewellin Prince of Wales; John de Say seems to have served in his place. In 1282 and 1283 he was summoned to Worcester to serve against the Welsh. By writ dated 30 September 1283 he was summoned to attend the Parliament at Shrewsbury. In 1287 he was summoned to appear with horses and
arms at a military council at Gloucester: in 1294 to attend the King on urgent affairs immediately upon receipt of the writ, dated 8 June. On 14 June 1294 he was ordered to attend the King at Portsmouth on the affairs of Gascony; and on 15 July 1294 he was granted protection as going with Edmund the King's brother to Gascony. He married Elizabeth (b). He died on or before 16 September 1295. [Complete Peerage XI:473-4

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Note: (b) After his death she was assigned as dower the manors of Cudham (Kent) and Hamsey (Sussex) with an annual payment from the manor of Birling (Kent).
1253 Elizabeth 1242 - 1309 William de Leybourne 67 67 1246 - 1327 Juliana de Sandwich 81 81 1282 Thomas de Leyburn 1222 - 1271 Roger de Leybourne 49 49 constable of the Tower of London in 1264-1265, and warden of the Cinque Ports in the same period. He is best known, however, for serving as constable of Bordeaux during Edward I's reign. There, he instituted the "decima vinorum" (the "tenth on wines") which was the impost that became so valuable that it was, for a time, the largest annual receipt of the exchequer, and paid for much of the early stages of the Hundred Years' War. The town of Libourne in the Bordelais was named for him, and remains, today, one of the leading centers of the claret trade.

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posted byFrank Young
soc.genealogy.medieval
Date: 2001-01-03 15:23:49 PST

ROGER DE LEYBURN, son and heir. In September 1252 he took part in a tournament or Round Table at Saffron Walden. In the encounter between him and Arnulf de Munteny they are called milites electissimi, the latter was mortally wounded, and Roger fell under suspicion.(b) He was pardoned on 20 October on the ground that the wounding was accidental. He was in the King's favour, and in July 1253 was granted an allowance of 40 marks per annum for life to maintain him in the King's service. In this year he went with the King to Gascony. In 1256 he was engaged in the Welsh war, and when the force in which he was serving was ambushed and almost destroyed by Llewelyn, he escaped. For some years little is heard of him, but he appears to have been attached to the household of Prince Edward, who in December 1259 made him "approver" of his castle and manor at Bristol, and gave him (at Paris, 27 November 1260) the manor of Elham in Kent. In 1260-61 he was summoned to come to the King with horse and arms, but soon afterwards he was on the Barons' side, like other of the lords of the Marches, especially Roger de Clifford, with whom he was closely associated. Thereby he incurred the King's displeasure, and was called to account in respect of the manor of Elham and his use of the moneys of Prince Edward while he was the Prince's bailiff. For a time he seems to have been a wanderer. With other Marchers, however, on 18 August 1263, at Lambeth, he became one of the Prince's adherents, supporting him against Montfort. He thus recovered the King's favour, being made his steward in August, and in December he was made Warden of the Cinque Ports and Chamberlain of Sandwich, as well as Sheriff of Kent. He was one of the King's party who agreed to refer the dispute with Montfort to the arbitration of King Louis IX. When hostilities broke out in 1264 he was with the King at Northampton, and then took a leading part in the defence of Rochester Castle, where he was wounded. He fought at Lewes, 14 May, where he was taken prisoner, but released on giving hostages. After this he took refuge in the Welsh Marches and laid waste the country. On 4 June 1264 he was summoned to a Council. Refusing to attend the Oxford Parliament, he was sentenced to exile in November. In December, however, he was one of those allowed to go to Kenilworth to see Prince Edward, then a prisoner there. In January 1264/5 he had a safe conduct for passage to Ireland. He and Roger de Clifford were allowed to have an interview with Prince Edward at Hereford in May 1265, which is supposed to have led to the Prince's escape soon after. He fought at Evesham (4 August), where he saved the King's life, and was quickly rewarded.

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He was again made Sheriff of Kent in August, a keeper of the peace in Westmorland and co. Kent; Keeper of the coast of Kent and of the King's works at Westminster; Sheriff of Cumberland and keeper of Carlisle; Keeper of the forest of
Cumberland, warden and justiciar of the forest North of Trent, and (in October) a keeper of the city of London. He had other grants, including the manor of Berwick, and liberties for his manor of La Mote. Keeper of Rochester Castle, November 1265. In December, as the King's steward, he was sent to London with William Waleran to induce the citizens to make an accommodation with the King. The Mayor and about 40 citizens returned with him to Windsor, but were imprisoned by the King for a time. He was made custodian for life of the seven hundreds of the Weald of Kent, 12 March 1265/6. In September 1266 the King, wishing to show him special favour, ordered all persons to receive him everywhere with due honour as the King's Knight, and in October remitted debts due by him. In December he was appointed Constable of Nottingham Castle. In 1267 he was again Warden of the Cinque Ports, and in 1268 acquired the Castle of Leeds, Kent, by exchange with the King. In Paris, on 27 August 1269, he was one of the 4 guarantees on the part of Prince Edward to King Louis, as to their joint crusade. In November he was going to Gascony on the Prince's business. In May 1270 he had protection for four years on going to the Holy Land with the Prince. He appears to have gone part of the way, but returned. The Papal Nuncio was ordered to compel him to repay 1,000 silver marks received from the Cardinal Ottobon on his taking the Cross and saying he was ready to set
out. On 20 January 1270/1 he was commissioned to hear and determine cases of trespass in the Welsh Marches, but in April a substitute was appointed, as he was unable to go. He founded a chantry of two priests in Leybourne Church.

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He married, 1stly, (----), who was in Gloucester Castle in 1263 when it was captured by Montfort's sons. He married, 2ndly, before September 1267, Eleanor, widow, 1stly, of William DE VAUX and, 2ndly, of Roger (DE QUINCY), EARL OF WINCHESTER, and daughter of William (DE FERRERS), EARL OF DERBY, by his 1st wife, Sybil, 3rd daughter and coheir of William (MARSHAL), EARL OF PEMBROKE, sister of Walter, 8th Earl of Pembroke. He died circa October 1271, being still alive in the middle of that month. Dower was assigned to his widow 2 November. She died before 26 October 1274, and was buried at Leeds Priory. [Complete Peerage VII:634, XIV:433, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

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[b] Annales Mon. (Rolls Ser.), Vol. i, p. 150; Mat. Paris, Chron. Maj. (Rolls Ser.), Vol. v, p. 318. The latter says that. it was found that Roger's lance had not been blunted as usual, so that the point pierced Arnulf's helmet ; and it was
remembered that in a former encounter he had been unhorsed by Arnulf and his leg broken.
1220 - 1333 Idonea de Vipont 113 113 1190 Roger de Leybourne 1194 - 1221 Eleanor de Turnham 27 27 1160 - 1198 Robert de leybourne 38 38 1160 Margaret 1135 - 1181 Philip de Leybourne 46 46 1137 Amice FitzGerald 1165 - 1214 Stephen de Turnham 49 49 Note: Despite many references to Stephen de Turnham, I have no written sources as to his parents. But I find his ancestry in the newsgroup, SGM.

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Note: Stephen de Turnham, of Artington, Surrey, the King's Marshal, by Edeline, daughter and coheir of Randolf de Broc, the King's Usher and Marshal, son of Oyne Porcel. [Complete Peerage V:400 note (b)]

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Note: He [Roger de Leyburn] married, in or before 1219, Eleanor, youngest daughter and coheir of his guardian, Stephen DE THURNHAM, by Edeline, daughter and coheir of Ranulf DE BROC (n). Complete Peerage VII:630,

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(n) The husbands of the other 4 daughters were Thomas de Bavelingham, Adam de Bending, [Alianore m. ] Ralph son of Bernard de Tong, and [Beatrice m.] Ralph de Faye (she [Beatrice] m. 2ndly Hugh de Neville, see vol IX, p. 480, sub Neville). [Complete Peerage VII:630 note (n), XIV:433]

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Stephen, according to CP, appeared to have two daughters named Eleanor/Alianore who m. Roger de Leybourne & Ralph FitzBernard, with dates indicating that they were two different sisters. However, the following post was the first in a series of three (see daughter Clemence & her daughter Alianore for more info) posts by Rosie Bevan to SGM, which unraveled the mystery. Note that the heirs of Stephen named below turn out to be Mabel (his daughter who m. Thomas Bavelingham), Alice (his daughter who m. Adam Bendenges), Beatrice (his daughter who m. Ralph Fay), Roger de Leyburn (his grandson by his daughter Eleanor), and Alianore (his granddaughter (by his daughter Clemence) who m. Ralph FitzBernard). Eleanore & Clemence were both dead, which is why they were not named.

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From: "Rosie Bevan" (rbevan@paradise.net.nz)
Subject: Re: Turnham
Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
Date: 2003-02-20 17:38:34 PST

Dear Chris and Hap

It was Ralph fitz Bernard who was married to Eleanor. Robert de Leyburne had evidently married another daughter of Stephen de Turnham, and she was dead by 1220. Whether or not she was also named Eleanor is unclear.
 
The evidence for this comes from a curia regis suit in the Trinity term of 1220, in which Edelina de Broc sued Richard Malherbe for 4L 18s. rent, and William de Bathonia for 25 acres of meadow and 12 1/2 of wood with appurtenances in Artingdon, Surrey. They in turn called to warrant the heirs of Stephen de Turnham who were Thomas de Bavelingham and Mabel his wife, Adam de Bendenges and Alice his wife, Ralph de Fay and Beatrice his wife, Roger de Leyburn, Ralph fitz Bernard and Alianore his wife.

"Et ipsi Ricardus et Willelmus vacaverunt inde ad warrantum heredes Stephani de Turnham quondam viri ipsius Edeline, scilicet Thomam de Bavelingeham et Mabiliam uxorem ejus Adam de Bendeng' et Aliciam uxorem ejus Radulfum de Fay et Beariciam uxorem ejus Rogerum de Leyburn' Radulfum filium Bernardi et Alienoram uxorem ejus..."
[CRR v.IX, p.85]

VCH Surrey v.3 p.4, in a section dealing with this case, states that Eleanor was wife of Roger de Leyburne and uses as a source Maitland, Bracton's Notebook, 1410 ; Excerpta e Rot. Fin. (rec. Com.), ii, 25. As the Roger in the curia regis roll is without a wife, the obvious conclusion to draw is that he was the representative of the unnamed daughter i.e her son and heir. If she was indeed named Eleanor, it would seem there were two in the family.

The curious thing here is that Clemence, daughter of Stephen de Turnham is not mentioned, even though she was alive in 1220 and married to Wandril de Curceles, attorney for Robert de Turneham and Joan Fossard, and had two later husbands [EYC v.2 no.995]. Artindon had descended via Edeline de Broc so the obvious inference is that Clemence was not a daughter of Edeline.

Cheers

Rosie

Note: The above statement about Clemence is cleared up in later postings by Rosie, which are contained in the next two generations (Clemence & Alianore).
1165 - 1211 Edelina de Broc 46 46 1140 - 1174 Robert de Turnham 34 34 1162 - >1204 Robert de Turnham 42 42 I have two separate sources for a Robert de Turnham: (1) as father of Beatrice m. Ralph de Fay (Plantagenet Ancestry); (2) as father of Isabel, heir of Robert de Turnham m. Pier de Mauley in c 1214 (CP). I originally had them as the same Robert; however the dates indicate that there are probably 2 different ones; as well as the fact that Isabel is 'heir' - not 'coheir' of Robert, according to CP. Therefore I have added a 2nd Robert, father of Isabel and son of Robert (who was father of Beatrice).This also allows Isabel to have a birth date of c 1197, which fits well with a marriage date of c 1214 and her parent's marriage date of c 1194-7.

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Robert de Turnham, who was Steward of Anjou in 1199, and Steward of Poitou in 1204, had m. c 1194/97, Joan, daughter and heir of William Fossard. Piers thus acquired in right of his wife the numerous lands comprising the Fossard fee in Yorkshire, which in 1166 had amounted to 33 1/2 knights' fees. [Complete Peerage VIII:555 note (c)]

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Sources:
Title: AFN:
Abbrev: AFN:
Title: The Phillips, Weber, Kirk and Staggs Family
Abbrev: The Phillips, Weber, Kirk and Staggs Family
Author: Jim Weber
1174 Mabel Turnham 1115 Robert de Turnham 1147 Ranulph de Broc 1156 Damietta de Garrom 1127 William de Garrom 1235 - 1327 Henry de Sandwich 92 92 1226 - 1280 Joan d' Auberville 54 54 1190 Simon de Sandwich 1162 Henry de Sandwich 1196 William d' Auberville Sir WILLIAM de AUBERVILLE of Westenhanger) who held Sutton alias Winkleton, Sutton parish, Kent from the abbot St Augustine of Norborne and Walmer manor, Welmer parish, Kent and a moiety of Ham manor
1225 Clarice de Auberville 1168 Hugh d' Auberville 1170 Joan 1147 Maud de Glanville 1136 William d' Auberville 1108 Hugh d' Auberville 1076 William d' Auberville FWIW: if the below can be believed, it appears the d'Aubervilles were based at/possessed Westenhanger since possibly 1066:

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"The ancient name (of Westenhanger) as it appears by the register of the monastery of St. Augustine was Le Hangre derived from the Saxon word "angra" meaning a wood. When the estate was later divided, the two parts were called Ostenhanger and Westenhanger until they became re-united under Sir Edward Poynings in 1509.

The property in the 12th century belonged to the Auberville family who were descended from Willam de Ogburville mentioned in the Doomsday Book, a knight who came over with William the Conqueror".

Through marriage Westenhanger Castle passed into the de Criol family and Sir John de Criol was allowed in 1343 to crenellate (embattle and make loop-holes) and two years later obtained a licence to found and endow a chantry in the Chapel of St. John in Westenhanger. [Ref: http://www.westenhangercastle.co.uk/Westenhanger_Castle_Histor.html]

Also FWIW: Osten & Westen are German for towards the East/West; Hang/Hänge means ridge/slope; Anger means a grass plot, a green, a common. Maybe just a coincidence, but Old Saxon & Old German do have the same roots.

Note: provided by curt_hofemann@yahoo.com
1312 Robert Hert 1243 - 1295 Idonea de Malpas 52 52 1220 - 1283 Adam de Newmarch 63 63 1224 Joan de Bently 1252 Adam de Newmarch 1196 John de Newmarch 1202 Pernel 1226 Joan de Newmarch 1165 Adam de Newmarch 1120 Henry de Newmarch 1150 William de Newmarch 1108 William de Newmarch 1110 Mabilia de Ballon 1090 Adam de Neufmarche 1070 Winebald de Ballon 1075 Elizabeth 1037 Drew Miles de Ballon 1068 Bertha Emma de Ballon 1305 - 1359 Geoffrey de Saye 54 54 1511 Elizabeth de Vere 1516 John de Vere 1499 - 1526 John de Vere 26 26 1518 - 1557 Anne Howard 39 39 George de Vere 1470 Margaret Stafford 1408 - 1461 John de Vere 52 52 1410 - 1475 Elizabeth Howard 65 65 Aubrey de Vere John de Vere Richard de Vere 1386 - 1415 Richard de Vere 29 29 Held a command at the Battle of Agincourt. 1390 Alice Sergeaux Robert de Vere 1346 - 1393 Richard Sergeaux 47 47 1352 - 1399 Phillippa Fitzalan 47 47 1378 Elizabeth Sergeaux 1381 Phillippa Sergeaux 1327 - 1349 Edmund Fitzalan 22 22 1330 Sybil Montagu D. 1409 John Howard Joan Walton 1367 - 1381 Margaret de Plaiz 14 14 1365 - 1436 John Howard 71 71 1443 - 1524 Thomas Howard 81 81 Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (1443 – 21 May 1524) was an English soldier and statesman, and son of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk by his first wife Catherine de Moleyns the daughter of William de Moylens and Margery Whalesborough.

As the Earl of Surrey, Howard fought for King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, following which he was imprisoned for several years before having his titles and estates restored. He continued in the service of the Tudor dynasty and was Lieutenant General of the North and largely responsible for the defeat of the Scots at the Battle of Flodden in 1513.

In 1514, Howard was restored to the dukedom of Norfolk which had been forfeit since 1485.

He died in 1524 and was buried in Thetford Priory. The priory was abandoned at the Dissolution of the Monasteries and while some of the Howard family tombs were moved to the St Michael the Archangel, Framlingham it is not known whether his tomb was moved also. Fragments of what is thought to be from his tomb were found during excavations.
Where his body now lies is not known for certain. A monumental brass depicting him was formerly in the Church of St. Mary at Lambeth so his body could have been moved to the Howard family chapel where many members of his family (including Anne Boleyn's mother) were interred.
However it is known that there are also four coffins in the tomb of the 3rd Duke of Norfolk at St Michael the Archangel, Framlingham so possibly the 2nd Duke and the 1st Duke of Norfolk were buried in the tomb of their descendant.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
Agnes Tilney 1510 William Howard 1440 Hugh de Tylney 1462 Eleanor Tailboys 1451 - 1495 Robert Tailboys 44 44 1495 Elizabeth Heron 1467 George Tailboys 1415 - 1464 William Tailboys 49 49 1425 - 1491 Elizabeth Bonville 66 66 1393 - 1460 William Bonville 66 66 1397 - 1427 Margaret Grey 30 30 1405 Phillipa Bonville William Bonville Margaret Bonville 1366 - 1396 John Bonville 30 30 1371 - 1414 Elizabeth FitzRoger 43 43 1330 - 1408 William Bonville 78 78 1347 - 1399 Margaret D'Aumarle 52 52 1293 Nicholas Bonville 1299 Joanna Champernon 1260 - 1295 Nicholas Bonville 35 35 1270 - 1295 Hawise de Pyne 25 25 1230 - 1268 William Bonville 38 38 Joan 1212 - 1264 Nicholas Bonville 52 52 Amesia 1244 Thomas de Pyne Avis 1274 - 1329 Henry Champernon 55 55 1279 Joan Bodrugan 1234 - 1304 William Champernon 70 70 1252 Joan Arundel 1207 - 1272 Henry de Champernowne 65 65 1212 - 1284 Dionisia English 72 72 1186 Robert English 1150 Gilbert English 1236 Richard Chambernon 1195 - 1232 Oliver Champernowne 37 37 Sandberg dates gives b. c. 1171 and died after 1210

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3017071&id=I585454652&style=TABLE
1175 Eve of Cardigan Elizabeth Champernowne 1165 - 1210 Henry de Champernowne 45 45 1170 - 1237 Rohais de Tracy 67 67 John de Champernowne D. 1203 Henry de Champernowne 1100 - 1170 Mabel of Gloucester 70 70 1078 1109 - 1190 Mabira de Caen 81 81 1096 - 1190 Jordan de Champernowne 94 94 1135 - 1170 William de Tracy 35 35 1137 Pomeroy 1069 - 1135 Henry England 66 66 Henry I (of England) (1068-1135), third Norman king of England (1100-1135), fourth son of William the Conqueror. Henry was born in Selby. Because his father, who died in 1087, left him no land, Henry made several unsuccessful attempts to gain territories on the Continent. On the death of his brother William II in 1100, Henry took advantage of the absence of another brother—Robert, who had a prior claim to the throne—to seize the royal treasury and have himself crowned king at Westminster. Henry subsequently secured his position with the nobles and with the church by issuing a charter of liberties that acknowledged the feudal rights of the nobles and the rights of the church. In 1101 Robert, who was duke of Normandy, invaded England, but Henry persuaded him to withdraw by promising him a pension and military aid on the Continent. In 1102 Henry put down a revolt of nobles, who subsequently took refuge in Normandy (Normandie), where they were aided by Robert. By defeating Robert at Tinchebray, France, in 1106, Henry won Normandy. During the rest of his reign, however, he constantly had to put down uprisings that threatened his rule in Normandy. The conflict between Henry and Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, over the question of lay investiture (the appointment of church officials by the king), was settled in 1107 by a compromise that left the king with substantial control in the matter.

Because he had no surviving male heir, Henry was forced to designate his daughter Matilda as his heiress. After his death on December 1, 1135, at Lyons-la-Fôret, Normandy, however, Henry's nephew, Stephen of Blois, usurped the throne, plunging the country into a protracted civil war that ended only with the accession of Matilda's son, Henry II, in 1154.

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Henry I (c.1068 - December 1, 1135), called Henry Beauclerk or Henry Beauclerc because of his scholarly interests, was the youngest son of William the Conqueror. He reigned as King of England from 1100 to 1135, succeeding his brother, William II Rufus. He was also known by the nickname "Lion of Justice". His reign is noted for his limitations on the power of the crown, his improvements in the machinery of government, his reuniting of the dominions of his father, and his controversial decision to name his daughter as his heir.

Henry was born between May 1068 and May 1069, probably in Selby, Yorkshire in England. As the youngest son of the family, he was most likely expected to become a bishop and was given extensive schooling for a young nobleman of that time period. He was probably the first Norman ruler to be fluent in English.

His father William, upon his death in 1087, bequeathed his dominions to his sons in the following manner:

Robert received the Duchy of Normandy
William received the Kingdom of England
Henry received 5000 pounds of silver
It is reported that he prophesied that Henry would eventually get everything his father had (Cross, 1917).

The two older brothers made an agreement that if either died without an heir, the two dominions of their father would be reunited under the surviving brother. When William II died in 1100, however, Robert was returning from the First Crusade. His absence, along with his poor reputation among the Norman nobles, allowed Henry to seize the keys of the royal hoard at Winchester. He was accepted as king by the leading barons and was crowned three days later on August 5 at Westminster. He immediately secured his position among the nobles by issuing the Charter of Liberties, which is considered a forerunner of the Magna Carta.

On November 11, 1100 Henry married Edith, daughter of King Malcolm III of Scotland. Since Edith was also the niece of Edgar Atheling, the marriage united the Norman line with old English line of kings. The marriage greatly displeased the Norman barons, however, and as a concession to their sensibilities, Edith changed her named to Matilda upon becoming queen.

The following year in 1101, Robert Curthose attempted to seize back the crown by an invading England. In the Treaty of Alton, Robert agreed to recognize Henry as king of England and return peacefully to Normandy, upon receipt of an annual sum of 2000 marks, which Henry proceeded to pay.

In 1105, to eliminate the continuing threat from Robert, Henry led an expeditionary force across the English Channel. In 1106, he decisively defeated his brother's Norman army at Tinchebray. He imprisoned his brother and appropriated the Duchy of Normandy as a possession of England, thus reuniting his father's dominions.

As king, Henry carried out social and judicial reforms, including:

issuing the Charter of Liberties
restoring laws of King Edward the Confessor.
He had two children by Matilda before her death in 1118: Maud, born February 1102, and William Adelin, born November 1103. On January 29, 1121, he married Adeliza, daughter of Godfrey, Count of Louvain, but there were no children from this marriage. He also holds the record for the largest number of acknowledged illegitimate children born to any English king, with a provisional total of twenty-five. One of his illegitimate daughters, Sybilla, married King Alexander I of Scotland.

However, his only legitimate son William Adelin perished in the wreck of the White Ship, on November 25, 1120, off the coast of Normandy. Also among the dead were Henry's illegitimate son Richard and illegitimate daughter Matilda, Countess of Perche, as well as a niece, Lucia de Blois.



Left without male heirs, Henry took the unprecedented step of making his barons swear to accept his daughter Matilda, widow of Henry V, the Holy Roman Emperor, as his heir.

Henry died of food poisoning from eating foul lampreys in December, 1135, at St. Denis le Fermont in Normandy and was buried at Reading Abbey.



Although Henry's barons had sworn allegiance to his daughter Matilda as their queen, Matilda's sex and her remarriage to the House of Anjou, an enemy of the Normans, allowed Henry's nephew Stephen of Boulogne to come to England and claim the throne with popular support.

The struggle between Matilda and Stephen resulted in a long civil war known as the Anarchy. The dispute was eventually settled by Stephen's naming of Matilda's son, Henry, as his heir in 1153.

---

# Note:

    Henry I was born in the year 1068---a factor he himself regarded as highly significant, for he was the only son of the Conqueror born after the conquest of England, and to Henry this meant he was heir to the throne. He was not an attractive proposition: he was dissolute to a degree, producing at least a score of bastards; but far worse he was prone to sadistic cruelty---on one occasion, for example, personally punishing a rebellious burgher by throwing him from the walls of his town.

# Note:

    At the death of William the Conqueror, Henry was left no lands, merely 5,000 pounds of silver. With these he bought lands from his elder brother Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy, only to see them taken back again a few years later by Robert, in unholy alliance with his brother William Rufus.

# Note:

    Henry could do little to avenge such treatment, but in England he found numerous barons who were tired of the exactions and ambitions of their king. He formed alliances with some of these, notably with the important de Clare family. He and some of the de Clares were with William Rufus on his last hunting expedition, and it is thought that the king's death was the result of Henry's plotting.

# Note:

    Certainly he moved fast to take advantage of it; leaving Rufus's body unattended in the woods, he swooped down on Winchester to take control of the treasury. Two days later he was in Westminster, being crowned by the Bishop of London. His speed is understandable when one realises that his elder brother, Robert [Curthose], was returning from the crusade, and claimed, with good reason, to be the true heir.

# Note:

    Henry showed great good sense in his first actions as King. He arrested Ranulph Flambard, William's tax-gatherer, and recalled Anselm, the exiled Archbishop. Furthermore, he issued a Charter of Liberties which promised speedy redress of grievances, and a return to the good government of the Conqueror. Putting aside for the moment his many mistresses, he married the sister of the King of Scots, who was descended from the royal line of Wessex; and lest the Norman barons should think him too pro-English in this action, he changed her name from Edith to Matilda. No one could claim that he did not aim to please.

# Note:

In 1101 Robert Curthose invaded, but Henry met him at Alton, and persuaded him to go away again by promising him an annuity of £2,000. He had no intention of keeping up the payments, but the problem was temporarily solved.

# Note:

    He now felt strong enough to move against dissident barons who might give trouble in the future. Chief amongst these was the vicious Robert of Bellême, Earl of Shrewsbury, whom Henry had known for many years as a dangerous troublemaker. He set up a number of charges against him in the king's court, making it plain that if he appeared for trial he would be convicted and imprisoned. Thus Robert and his colleagues were forced into rebellion at a time not of their own choosing, were easily defeated and sent scuttling back to Normandy.

# Note:

    In Normandy Robert Curthose began to wreak his wrath on all connected with his brother, thus giving Henry an excellent chance to retaliate with charges of misgovernment and invade. He made two expeditions in 1104-5, before the great expedition of 1106 on which Robert was defeated at the hour-long battle of Tinchebrai, on the anniversary of Hastings. No one had expected such an easy victory, but Henry took advantage of the state of shock resulting from the battle to annex Normandy. Robert was imprisoned (in some comfort, it be said); he lived on for 28 more years, ending up in Cardiff castle whiling away the long hours learning Welsh. His son William Clito remained a free agent, to plague Henry for most of the rest of his reign.

# Note:

    In England the struggle with Anselm over the homage of bishops ran its course until the settlement of 1107. In matters of secular government life was more simple: Henry had found a brilliant administrator, Roger of Salisbury, to act as Justiciar for him. Roger had an inventive mind, a keen grasp of affairs, and the ability to single out young men of promise. He quickly built up a highly efficient team of administrators, and established new routines and forms of organisation within which they could work. To him we owe the Exchequer and its recording system of the Pipe Rolls, the circuits of royal justiciars spreading the king's peace, and the attempts at codification of law. Henry's good relationships with his barons, and with the burgeoning new towns owed much to skilful administration. Certainly he was able to gain a larger and more reliable revenue this way than by the crude extortion his brother had used.

# Note:

    In 1120 came the tragedy of the White Ship. The court was returning to England, and the finest ship in the land was filled with its young men, including Henry's son and heir William. Riotously drunk, they tried to go faster and faster, when suddenly the ship foundered. All hands except a butcher of Rouen were lost, and England was without an heir.

# Note:

    Henry's only legitimate child was Matilda, but she was married to the Emperor Henry V of Germany, and so could not succeed. But in 1125 her husband died, and Henry brought her home and forced the barons to swear fealty to her---though they did not like the prospect of a woman ruler. Henry then married her to Geoffrey of Anjou, the Normans' traditional enemy, and the barons were less happy---especially when the newly-weds had a terrible row, and Geoffrey ordered her out of his lands. In 1131 Henry, absolutely determined, forced the barons to swear fealty once more, and the fact that they did so is testimoney of his controlling power. Matilda and Geoffrey were reunited, and in 1133 she produced a son whom she named for his grandfather. If only Henry could live on until his grandson was old enough to rule, all would be well.

# Note:

    But in 1135, against doctor's orders, he ate a hearty meal of lampreys, got acute indigestion, which turned into fever, and died. He was buried at his abbey in Reading---some said in a silver coffin, for which there was an unsuccessful search at the Dissolution. [Source: Who's Who in the Middle Ages, John Fines, Barnes & Noble Books, New York, 1995]

# Note:

Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 161-9

Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on
Page: Henry I

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 262-27, 33a-23
1097 - 1136 William de Tracy 39 39 1101 1072 Gieva de Tracy 1040 - 1110 William de Tracy 70 70 1045 Rohesia 1009 - 1068 Turgis de Tracy 59 59 1110 - 1167 Henry of Berry Pomeroy 57 57 1120 - 1176 Rohese FitzHerbert 56 56 Joscelin de la Pomeroy D. 1086 Ralph de la Pomeroy 1153 Gilbert Andea 1153 Isolda Baronis Andrew de Cardigan 1317 - 1361 William D'Aumarle 44 44 Agnes de Meriot John de Meriot 1345 - 1372 John FitzRoger 27 27 1346 Alice Bonville 1318 - 1352 Henry FitzRoger 34 34 1324 - 1387 Elizabeth de Holand 63 63 1295 - 1322 Roger FitzPeter 27 27 Peter FitzReynold Ela Martel 1468 Edward Trussel 1472 Margaret Dunn 1440 William Trussel 1448 Bridget Kene 1420 William Kene 1431 Agnes Chichley 1411 - 1446 John Chichley 35 35 1416 Margery Knollys 1439 Margery Chichley 1390 - 1435 Thomas Knollys 45 45 1364 - 1425 William Chichley 61 61 1386 Beatrix Barrett 1336 - 1400 Thomas Chichley 64 64 1340 Agnes Pinchon 1345 William Barrett 1431 John Dunn 1429 Elizabeth Hastings 1407 - 1443 Griffith Dunn 36 36 1409 Joan Scudamore 1381 Meredith Dunn 1385 Mabel verch Griffith 1376 John Scudamore 1385 Alice Glendower 1396 John Scudamore 1336 Jenkin Scudamore 1340 Alice Vaughn John Scudamore Joyce Marbury 1353 - 1414 Owain ap Gruffydd 61 61 1357 Margred de Hanmer Gruffydd ap Gruffydd Helen verch Thomas David de Hanmer Agnes verch Llewellyn 1396 - 1455 Leonard Hastings 59 59 1404 Alice Philippa Camoys 1431 William Hastings 1366 - 1398 Ralph Hastings 32 32 1380 - 1398 Maud de