Click to enlarge/reduce the GenoMap image Hide this GenoMap frame

Family Subtree Diagram : ..Elizabeth FitzHugh (1465)

PLEASE NOTE: If you do not see a GRAPHIC IMAGE of a family tree here but are seeing this text instead then it is most probably because the web server is not correctly configured to serve svg pages correctly. see http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/SVG:Server_Configuration for information on how to correctly configure a web server for svg files. ? Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Marriage (three children) Marriage (a child) Marriage (a child) Marriage 1 Marriage (a child) (three children) (two children) (a child) (three children) (two children) (two children) (five children) (three children) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (three children) (six children) (five children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (six children) (three children) (three children) (five children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (five children) (three children) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (four children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (two children) (four children) (a child) (a child) (three children) (three children) (a child) (two children) (four children) (three children) (four children) (five children) (five children) (five children) (a child) (five children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (five children) (six children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (three children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (five children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (twelve children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (five children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (five children) (three children) (a child) (two children) (three children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) ~1398 - 1457 Eleanor Fitzhugh 59 59 He [Philip Darcy] married, before 28 October 1412, Alianore, daughter of Sir Henry FITZHUGH, of Ravensworth in Richmondshire [LORD FITZHUGH], by Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir Robert GREY. He died s.p.m., 2 August 1419, aged 20. At his death any Barony, that may be supposed to have been created by the writ of 1332 , fell into abeyance. His widow's dower was ordered to be assigned, 5 March 1420/1. She married, 2ndly (pardon for marrying without the King's consent, 18 February 1426/7), Sir Thomas TUNSTALL, of Thurland, co. Lancaster. She married, 3rdly, as 2nd wife, Sir Henry BROUNFLETE, of Londesborough, co. York, afterwards LORD VESSY. She died 30 September 1457. He died 16 January 1468/9. [Complete Peerage IV:65-7, (transcribed by DaveUtzinger)]

---

Sources:
Title: British Roots of Maryland Families II
Abbrev: British Roots of Maryland Families II
Author: Robert W. Barnes
Publication: 2002
Title: AFN:
Abbrev: AFN:
Title: The Johns-Alexander Descendants of William the Conqueror
Abbrev: The Johns-Alexander Descendants of William the Con
Author: Nancy and Boyd Alexander
Publication: uploaded Jun 2, 2001
Title: The Phillips, Weber, Kirk and Staggs Family
Abbrev: The Phillips, Weber, Kirk and Staggs Family
Author: Jim Weber
Title: Royal Genealogy
Abbrev: Royal Genealogy
Author: Brian Tompsett
Publication: 1994-1999
Title: Tudor Place
Abbrev: Tudor Place
Author: Jorge H. Castelli
1365 - 1427 Elizabeth Grey 62 62 1359 - 1424 Henry Fitzhugh 65 65 1342 - 1369 Lora St. Quintin 27 27 1345 - 1367 Robert Marmion de Grey 22 22 1080 William Bertram 1108 Hawise de Baliol 1128 - 1199 Roger de Bertram 71 71 Roger Bertram I, eldest son, with his cross confirmed his father's deed of Brinkburne Priory. In 1157 he gave fifty marks for a market at Mitford. Held of the crown, in 1165, by the service of five knight's fees, by which his father and grandfather had holden under Henry I. In 1172 he paid œ6 10s scutage, to excuse his either going himself or sending a proxy with Henry II, to the conquest of Ireland. To the monks of Newminster he gave the granges of Highlaws, in this parish, and of Horton in the parish of Ponteland, and a part of a peat moss to the nuns of Holystane, the woods called Baldwinwood, and afterwards Nunriding. This was the Roger Bertram who confirmed his father's grants to the monks of Brinkburne, and gave to them the church of Felton, and to them and their men residing within Feltonshire, common of pasture on a moiety of the ground holden by Eudo de Sauceby in exchange for a moiety carucate of land which he had given to his uncle in Aldworth. Richard and Robert Bertram and Ralph de St. Peter bring witnesses to the grant. He married Ada ....., who was a benefactor to the Newminster Priory.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 702)

ROGER BERTRAM, eldest son, who 12 Henry II (1166) certified to six and one-half knights fees and 18 Henry II (1122) paid scutage for not going in the expedition to Ireland; by Ada his wife had as son and heir William.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 167)
1090 Dionsyia de Northumberland 1085 Guy de Baliol Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: II:160 (a)
1190 - 1233 Joan De Briwere 43 43 1032 - 1101 Guy De Ponthieu 69 69 Harold Godwinson, or Harold II of England was shipwrecked at Ponthieu, Normandy in 1064 and taken captive by Guy (or Wido according to the Bayeux Tapestry) who was the then Count of Ponthieu. It is alleged that William (Duke of Normandy - later William I of England) discovering that Harold had been taken captive, sent messengers ordering Count Guy to hand over his prisoner. William then forced Harold to swear to support his claim to the throne, only revealing after the event that the box on which Harold had made his oath contained holy relics, making the promise especially binding.
1035 - 1065 Ada d' Amiens 30 30 1220 Anastasia de Percy 1095 - 1143 Godfrey of Brabrant 48 48 1222 Isabel de Ferrers 1112 - 1147 Guy de Ponthieu 35 35 1052 - 1131 Robert de la Spencer 79 79 * Chamberlain to William the Conqueror
* Event: Name Change Took the name Despencer
He succeeded his mother in the Seigneuries of Bellême and Alençon in 1082

ROBERT DE MONTGOMERY, surnamed Belesme, succeeded in 1082 to the Earldoms of Belesme and Alençon, Arundel and Shrewsbury; sided with Robert Courte-Heuse; in 1102 forfeited his English earldoms; imprisoned at Wareham, Dorsetshire, by Henry I in 1113; married Agnes, daughter and heiress of Guy, Count de Ponthieu (ped. 61)

(*)Bank's Extinct Peerage, Vol. 1, p. 5; House of Arundel, by Yeatman, p. 8; L'Art, Vol. XIII, p. 147.


Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury (1052- after 1130) was an Anglo-Norman nobleman, and one of the most promiment figures in the competition for the succession to England and Normandy between the sons of William the Conqueror.

He was the eldest son of Roger of Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and Mabel of Bellême.

Robert's first notable act, as a young man, was to take part in the 1077 revolt of the young Robert Curthose against William the Conqueror, an act he shared with many other Norman nobles of his generation. The rebellion was put down, and the participants pardoned. William did require that ducal garrisons be placed in the important baronial castles, which would make future rebellion much more difficult.

Robert's mother Mabel was killed in 1082, whereupon Robert inherited her property which stretched across the hilly border region between Normandy and Maine. It is due to this early inheritance that Robert has come be known as of Bellême rather than of Montgomery.

William the Conqueror died in 1087, and Robert's first act on hearing the news was to expel the ducal garrisons from his castles. Robert Curthose was the new duke of Normandy, but he was unable to keep order, and Robert of Bellême had a free hand to make war against his less powerful neighbors.

The next year in the Rebellion of 1088, Odo of Bayeux rebelled in an attempt to place Curthose on the English throne in place of William Rufus. At Curthose's request Robert went to England, where he joined in the rebels' defense of Rochester Castle. The rebels were permitted to leave after the surrender of the castle and failure of the rebellion.

Robert returned to Normandy. But Odo had preceded him, had gotten the ear of the duke, and conviced Curthose that Robert was a danger to the security of the duchy. Thus Robert was arrested and imprisoned upon his disembarkation. (The duke's younger brother Henry, who was on the same ship, was also arrested.)

Robert's father earl Roger came over from England, and, taking over his son's castles, defied Curthose. The duke captured several of the castles, but he soon tired of the matter and released Robert.

Once released, Robert returned to his wars and depredations against his neighbors in southern Normandy. He did help Curthose in putting down a revolt by the citizens of Rouen, but his motive seems to have been in large part to seize as many wealthy townspeople and their goods as possible. Curthose in turn subsequently helped Robert is some of his fights againsts his neighbors.

In 1094 one of Robert's most important castles, Domfront, was taken over by the duke's brother Henry, who never relinquished it and was to be an enemy of Robert for the rest of his life.

Later that year (1094) Robert's father earl Roger died. Robert's younger brother Hugh of Montgomery, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury inherited the English lands and titles, while Robert inherited his father's Norman properties, which included good part of central and southern Normandy, in part adjacent to the Bellême territories he had already inherited from his mother.

In 1098 Robert's younger brother Hugh died, and Robert inherited the English properties that had been their father's, including the Rape of Arundel and the Earldom of Shrewsbury.

Robert was one of the great magnates who joined Robert Curthose's 1101 invasion of England, along with his brothers Roger the Poitevin and Arnulf of Montgomery and his nephew William of Mortain. This invasion, which aimed to depose Henry I, ended in the Treaty of Alton. The treaty called for amnesty for the participants but allowed traitors to be punished. Henry had a series of charges drawn up against Robert in 1102, and when Robert refused to answer for them, gathered his forces and besieged and captured Robert's English castles. Robert lost his English lands and titles (as did his brothers), was banished from England, and returned to Normandy.

He was one of Curthose's commanders at the Battle of Tinchebrai and by flight from the field avoided being captured as Curthose was. With Normandy now under Henry's rule, he submitted and was allowed to retain his Norman fiefs. But after various conspiracies and plans to free Curthose Robert was seized and imprisoned in 1112. He spent the rest of his life in prison; the exact date of his death is not known.

Robert married Agnes of Ponthieu, by whom he had one child, William Talvas, who via his mother inherited the county of Ponthieu.

Robert had a quick wit, was a good military leader and was perhaps the best castle designer of his generation, but had a terrible reputation as a cruel sadist.

1055 - 1100 Agnes of Montreuil and Ponthieu 45 45 1133 - 1210 William de Glanville 77 77 1110 - 1174 Ela de Talvas 64 64 # Note:

    He [William de Warenne] married Ela or Ala, daughter of William TALVAS, COUNT OF PONTHIEU (son of Robert DE BELLÊME, 3rd EARL OF SHREWSBURY), by Ela, widow of Bertrand, COUNT OF TOULOUSE, and daughter of Eudes BOREL, DUKE OF BURGUNDY. He died s.p.m. 19 January 1147/8, being slain when the rearguard of the French King's army was cut to pieces in the defiles of Laodicea. His widow married, probably in or before 1152, Patrick (DE SALISBURY), 1st EARL OF WILTSHIRE or SALISBURY (died 1168). She is said to have died 4 October 1174.

# Note:

Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
Page: 112

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 83-25, 108-26

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XI:375-7 ,XII/1:497
1193 - 1245 William De Percy 52 52 Rissa De Montgomery 1465 - 1513 Elizabeth FitzHugh 48 48 1460 Nicholas Vaux 1429 - 1472 Henry FitzHugh 43 43 1431 - 1503 Alice Neville 72 72 1448 Alice FitzHugh 1389 - 1452 William FitzHugh 63 63 1388 - 1452 Margery Willoughby 64 64 1425 Margaret FitzHugh 1409 - 1468 Elizabeth Fitz- Hugh 59 59 1422 Lora Fitzhugh 1391 Maude Fitzhugh 1337 - 1386 Henry Fitzhugh 49 49 1336 - 1386 Joan Scrope 50 50 1360 Maud Fitzhugh 1400 Lora Fitzhugh 1292 - 1352 Henry Fitzhugh 60 60 1300 - 1349 Joan de Fourneux 49 49 1341 Joan Fitzhenry 1266 - 1356 Henry Fitzhugh 90 90 1270 - 1337 Eve de Bulmer 67 67 1240 - 1304 Hugh Fitzhugh 64 64 1232 - 1302 Aubreda de Brumpton 70 70 1218 - 1257 Henry Fitzrandolph 39 39 1190 - 1238 Randolph Fitzhenry 48 48 Randolph Fitz-Henry m. Alice, dau. and heiress of Adam de Staveley, Lord of Staveley, by Alice, dau. of William de Percy, of Riddel, and dying in 1262, was s. by his elder son, Henry Fitz-Randolph. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant,
Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 207, FitzHugh, Barons FitzHugh]
1190 - 1253 Alice de Staveley 63 63 1253 - 1297 John de Bulmer 44 44 1253 - 1315 Tiphaine de Morwick 62 62 1288 Albreda de Bulmer 1220 - 1265 John de Bulmer 45 45 1225 - 1268 Katherine de Salvayn 43 43 1203 - 1269 Alice de Percy 66 66 1190 - 1256 John de Bulmer 66 66 1224 - 1269 Hugh de Morwick 45 45 1230 Agnes de Heyford 1184 - 1238 Hugh de Morwick 54 54 1205 - 1242 Sybil d'Umfreville 37 37 1142 - 1230 Ada de Morville 88 88 1154 Richard de Bertram 1163 - 1226 Richard de Umfreville 63 63 1177 - 1234 Sybilla de Torrington 57 57 1214 - 1245 Gilbert de Umfreville 31 31 1125 - 1181 Odinel de Umfreville 56 56 Odonell de Umfreville was one of the twelve English knights who went with Robert FitzHamon into Wales, when he came into full possession of the territories of the Lord of Glamorganshire, a considerable portion of which he divided among his twelve companions in arms. Odonell is the first of his family upon whom history has thrown any of her broader lights. He stands conspicuous in the field, was admitted at court, and though the cloister has censured him as an extortioner and a tyrant, yet he was a considerable benefactor to it. In the Red Book his name is written Odinal D'unfrancville. In 1262 and 1272 we find him paying assessments to scutage; and in the memorable incursion of William, the Lion, King of Scotland, into England in 1174, his castle of Harbottle was taken, and that of Prudhoe besieged, but relieved by the timely assistance of the Sheriff of Yorkshire, de Vescy, Lord of Alnwick and Malton, and other northern lords. He had, however, ample revenge on the Lion King for the injuries he had done him, for he was one of the eight barons who captured that monarch near Alnwick, in his return from that destructive raid. In 1176 Odanel was at the court of the King of England, and a witness to Henry's arbitration between the kings of Castile and Navarre; and on October 4th, the following year, he witnessed a grant of the King of Scotland, dated at Edinburgh. In the time of Richard I, his Northumberland property holden by knight's service of the crown, was assessed at two knight's fees, at which rate it continued for several generations afterwards, through his son Robert. He had other sons, William and Richard, and two daughters. Maud or Margery married William de Albini before 1198. Odonel died in 1182. Married Alice, daughter of Richard de Lucy.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 696)
1129 - 1197 Alice de Lucy 68 68 1107 - 1149 Rohesia de Clare 42 42 1098 - 1179 Richard de Lucy 81 81 1 BIRT 2 DATE ABT. 1089 1 PROP 2 PLAC Thorney Green, Suffolk, England


Excerpted from Les Seigneurs de Bohon by Jean Le Melletier, Coutances:

II, Richard I together with Humphrey de Behun III invaded Scotland in anattack against King William who supported Prince Henry and thedestruction of the bishop's palace at Durham. They went to Berwick and penetrated deeply into Scotland. But when they learned of the landing of Beaumont (earl of Leicester and friend of Prince Henry) in Suffolk (29 September 11??) , a truce with William the Lion and marched against Beaumont.

Domfront in western Normandy and probably entered royal service under Henry I. He is recorded as a supporter of S about the year 1140, succeeding Geoffrey de Mandeville as Justiciar and sheriff of Essex 1143.

justiciars in 1155. and after Leicester's death in 1168 Lucy held the office alone. As one of the king's councilors he must be given part of the credit for the important legislation of the period, and during which with Becket he was singled out by the king's enemies as a principal author of the Con Clarendon (1164).

of 1173-1174 w 1179 he resigned his office and entered the religious life at Lesnes Abbey, Erith, Kent, himself in 1178 in penance for his part in the events leading to Becket's death. He had been excommunicated by Becket in 1166 and again in 1169, and the archbishop's murder h part provoked by his refusal to life the sentences he had passed upon his enemies. Richard Lucy died at Lesnes on July 14, 1179.(Encyclopedia Brittanica).


---

Chief Justiciar. A loyal servant of Henry II and his Chief Justiciar for 25 years until he retired in 1178, he was the King's Councillor in the Becket dispute and was twice excommunicated by the exiled Archbishop. During the war of 1173-1174, while Henry stayed in France, Lucy held the fort in England, driving back the Scots in 1173 and defeting the rebel Earls of Leicester and Norfolk at the Battle of Fornham (Suffolk) in 1174. Source: Who's Who in British History. Collins & Brown. London 2000.
*********************
RootsWeb/mjr6387: Title: Sir Knight/Justiciar of Eng/Lt Eng and rohais. OCCUPATION: Justiciar of King Henry II, of Chipping Ongar, Essex, and Diss, NorfolkLieutenant of England - ruled in Henry II's absence.
--------------------
(b) The family appears to have taken its name from Luce, a commune in the department of Orne, about 6 kil. SE of Domfront, and in the bailiwick of Passeis. In the return of the Norman fees of 1172 there occurs the following: "De Passeis . . . Ricards de Lucceio j militem et sibi xvij milites" (H.F., vol xxiii, p. 697 e; so also in Red Book, Rolls Ser., vol ii, pl 639, but beginning "De Baillia de Basseis"). Luce lies geographically in Maine, and its real connection with Normandy dates from the occupation in 1092 of Domfront, the castle of Robert de Belleme, by Henry Beauclerc, the Count of the Cotentin. It seems probable that this particular connection between Henry I and the southern border of Normandy may have first brought the family to the King's notice, a view which is supported by the fact that in a charter for Seez Cathedral dated Feb 1131, Henry mentions a fief which he had bought from Richard de Lucy, and his mother Aveline. [Complete Peerage VIII:257 note (b)]
--------------------
The first mention of this family is in a render made by King Henry I of the lordship of Dice, in Norfolk (whether in requital of services, or as an inheritance, the record saith not) to Richard de Lucie, who was governor of Falais, in Normandy, temp. King Stephen, and defended that place with great valour when besieged by Geoffrey, Earl of Anjou, for which heroic conduct he had a grant of lands in the county of Essex with the services of divers persons, to hold by ten knights' fees. In the subsequent contest between Stephen and the Empress Maud, he remained steady in his allegiance to the former and obtained a victory of some importance near Wallingford Castle. Upon the adjustment of the dispute, the Tower of London and the castle of Winchester were, by the advice of the whole clergy, placed in the hands of this feudal lord, he binding himself by solemn oath and the hostage of his son to deliver them up on the death of King Stephen to King Henry, which, being eventually fulfilled, Richard de Lucy was constituted sheriff of Essex and Hertfordshire in the 2nd of Henry II, A.D. 1156, and in three years afterwards, being with the king in Normandy, he was despatched to England to procure the election of Thomas Becket, then lord chancellor, to the archiepiscopal see of Canterbury, vacant by the death of Theobald, Abbot of Becco. Soon after that he was appointed to the high office of Justice of England. In the 12th of this reign [1166], upon the aid then assessed for marrying the king's dau., he certified his knights' fees (lying in the cos. of Kent, Suffolk, and Norfolk) de veteri feoffamento, to be in number seven, and that his ancestors performed the service of Castle Guard at Dover, for the same, as also that he held on knight's fee more, de nova feoffamento, in the co. Devon.

About this time Becket, having fled into Normandy from the power of King Henry, came to Wiceliac to celebrate the feast of the ascension, and observing several persons of distinction present, amongst whom was this Richard de Lucie, he ascended the pulpit and there, with lighted candles, pronounced the sentence of excommunication against them all as public incendiaries betwixt the king and himself, but being neither convicted nor called to answer, they appealed and entered the church. Soon after this (13th Henry II) during a temporary absence of the king beyond sea, de Lucie was constituted Lieutenant of England, and again in 1173, when the Earl of Leicester and others having reared the standard of rebellion in behalf of Prince Henry, he besieged, in conjunction with Reginald, Earl of Cornwall, the town of Leicester and, having reduced it, demolished its walls and laid it in ashes.

In 1178, he founded the priory of Westwode in the diocese of Rochester in honour of St. Thomas, of Canterbury, the martyr, and began, about the same time, the foundation of the priory of Lesnes, in Kent, which he munificently endowed. In this priory he subsequently assumed the habit of a canon regular and departing this life soon after (about 22nd Henry II) [1176], and was buried in the chapter-house there.

He m. Rohais ---, and had issue, Geffrey, who d. in his father's lifetime, leaving Richard, his son and heir, who departing this life, s. p., before 1196, the inheritance devolved upon his aunt, Rohais; Hubert, who had the lordship of Stanford, in Essex, and hundred of Angre, for his livelihood, but d. s. p.; Maude, m. 1st to Walter Fitz-Robert, to whom she brought the lordship or Dice, and 2ndly, to Richard de Ripariis, and d. 27th Henry III, 1243, leaving issue; Rohais, m. 1st, to Fulbert de Dover, Lord of Chilham, in Kent, and 2ndly, Richard de Chilham. This Rohais, upon the decease of her nephew, succeeded to the estates of her elder brother and, upon the death of her younger brother, Hubert, she had livery of the whole barony on paying a fine to the crown in the 9th King John [1208]. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage Ltd, London, England, 1883), pp. 335-6, Lucy, Barons Lucy]




Justicar of England

"Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists etc" by Frederick Lewis Weiss, 6th Edition

pg 1018, Burke's "Extant Peerage and Baronetage etc", 1970 Edition

pg. 335, " A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire" by Sir Bernard Burke, published 1883

1159 Alice de Umfreville 1094 - 1162 Odinel de Umfreville 68 68 1060 - 1120 Robert de Umfreville 60 60 1030 - 1089 Robert de Umfreville 59 59 1005 Robert de Umfreville 1136 - 1243 Maud de Lucy 107 107 # Note:

    Maude m. 1st to Walter Fitz-Robert, to whom she brought the lordship of Disce; and 2ndly, to Richard de Ripariis, and d. 27th Henry III, 1243, leaving issue. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage Ltd, London, England, 1883, p. 336, Lucy, Barons Lucy]

1126 William de Lucy 1123 Aveline de Lucy 1120 - 1178 Geoffrey de Lucy 58 58 GEOFFREY DE LUCY (b), of Newington, son of Geoffrey, son and heir of Richard DE LUCY "the Loyal," justiciar of England (c).
(c) Bracton's Note Book, c 1159, which quotes verbatim the official report of a verdict given in Hilary term (1223) . . . Lewis C Loyd points out that, according to Robert de Torigni, when the Justiciar entered religion he was succeeded by his grandson Richard, son of Geoffrey. Roese therefore succeeded her brother, not her father or grandfather, and the inference to be drawn is that Richard the younger and Roese were Geoffrey's children by a first wife, and Geoffrey the younger his son by a second wife. The available evidence does not, however, exclude the possibility that the younger Geoffrey was illegitimate.[Complete Peerage VIII:257-8, XIV:457, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]
1064 Adrian de Lucy 1066 Aveline Goth 1070 Emma de Lucy 1312 - 1391 Henry Scrope 78 78 D. 1434 Joan Holland 1350 - 1397 Thomas de Holand 47 47 Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent (1350-1397) was an English nobleman and a councilor of his half-brother Richard II.

He was the son of Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent and Joan of Kent, daughter of Edmund of Woodstock and granddaughter of Edward I. After his father's death his mother married Edward the Black Prince.

When his father died in 1360 he became Baron de Holland. His mother was still Countess of Kent in her own right. At sixteen, in 1366, Holland was appointed captain of the English forces in Aquitaine. He fought in various campaigns over the following years, and was made a Knight of the Garter in 1375.

Richard II became king in 1377, and soon Holland acquired great influence over his younger half-brother. This influence, in most historians view, was utilized primarily for Holland's own enrichment. In 1381 he was created Earl of Kent.

Holland married Alice Fitzalan, daughter of Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel. He was succeeded by his eldest son Thomas Holland, 1st Duke of Surrey.
1352 - 1415 Alice FitzAlan de Arundel 63 63 1382 Edmund de Holand 1385 - 1439 Margaret de Holand 54 54 1373 - 1405 Alianor de Holand 32 32 Elizabeth de Holand 1371 Thomas de Holand 1301 - 1330 Edmund Plantagenet 28 28 Earl of Kent
Edmund Plantagenet, surnamed of Woodstock, Earl of Kent, married Margaret, daughter of John, Lord Wake.

Edmund Plantagenet, born August 5, 1301, surnamed of Woodstock, from the place of his birth, 2nd son of Edward I, was summoned to Parliament by writ, directed to Edmundo de Woodstock, August 5, 1320. He had previously been in the wars of Scotland and had obtained considerable territorial grants from the crown. In the next year he was created Earl of Kent and had a grant of the Castle of Okham, in the County of Rutland, and shrievalty of the county. About the same time he was constituted Governor of the Castle of Tunbridge. He married Margaret, Countess of Wake, daughter of John Wake, who died in 1304, and was succeeded by his son Thomas, Lord Wake, who died sine prole in 1349, leaving his sister Margaret his heir, who carried the Barony of Wake into the family of Plantagenet. They had two sons, Edmund, who became Baron Wake and Earl of Kent, but died in his minority, and was succeeded by his brother John, who also died sine prole in 1352. Their sister Margaret had also died sine prole, and the Earldom of Kent and the Baronies of Woodstock and Wake, honours of their father and a dignity of their mother, devolved upon their only surviving sister, Joan.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 383)

Edmund Plantagenet, or Edmund of Woodstock (August 5, 1301 – March 19, 1330) was Earl of Kent from July 28, 1321 (1st creation).
He was born at Woodstock, Oxfordshire, the son of King Edward I of England by his second Queen consort Marguerite of France. As the youngest of the six princes he enjoyed his father's favour. Woodstock was married to Margaret Wake, the daughter of Baron John Wake by Joan, sometime between October and December in 1325 at Blisworth in Northamptonshire.
He was from 1327 'after the execution and forfeiture of John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel' for the three remaining years of his life to hold the castle and honour of Arundel, although he was never formally invested with the titles appropriate to his barony. He was the father of Joan of Kent, through whom the earldom eventually passed into the Holland family.
Edmund was executed for treason, having supported his half-brother, the deposed King Edward II, by order of the 'Regents Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Queen Isabella of France', before the outer walls of Winchester Castle. It was said that he had conspired to rescue King Edward from prison. Such was public hostility to the execution that "he had to wait five hours for an executioner, because nobody wanted to do it".
Woodstock was buried on March 31 at the Church of the Dominican Friars in Winchester.
Woodstock's execution would appear a retaliation for Edward I's crushing defeat against Simon de Montfort at the Battle of Evesham in 1265, and because the king had treated his rebellious cousins with such great savagery, pursuing the surviving members of the de Montfort family relentlessly.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
1314 - 1360 Thomas de Holand 46 46 1328 - 1385 Joan Plantagenet 57 57 1283 Margaret Wake 1350 - 1400 John de Holand 50 50 John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter (1352? - January 16, 1400), also Earl of Huntingdon, was an English nobleman, primarily remembered for helping cause the downfall of Thomas of Woodstock and then for conspiring against Henry IV.

He was the third son of Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent and Joan "the fair maid of Kent", daughter of Edmund of Woodstock, a son of Edward I. His mother later married Edward, the Black Prince. Holland was thus half-brother to Richard II, to whom he remained loyal the rest of his life.

Early in Richard's reign, Holland was made a Knight of the Garter (1381). He was also part of the escort that accompanied the queen-to-be, Anne of Bohemia, on her trip to England.

Holland had a violent temper, which got him in trouble several times. The most famous incident occured during Richard II's 1385 expedition to Scotland. Ralph Stafford, eldest son of the Earl of Stafford, killed one of Holland's esquires. Stafford went to find Holland to apologize, but Holland killed him as soon as he identified himself. The king had Holland's lands seized. Their mother died during this time, it is said of grief at these events.

Early the next year Holland reconciled with the Staffords, and had his property restored. Later in 1386 he married Elizabeth, daughter of John of Gaunt. He and Elizabeth then went on Gaunt's expedition to Spain, where Holland was constable of the English army. After his return to England he was created Earl of Huntingdon, on June 2, 1387. In 1389 he was appointed chamberlain of England for life, admiral of the fleet in the western seas, and constable of Tintagel Castle. During this time he also received large grants of land from the king.

Over the next several years he held a number of additional offices: constable of Conway Castle (1394), governor of Carlisle (1395), and then governor and then constable-general of the west marches towards Scotland. His military servies were interrupted by a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1394 (which may be connected with his earlier troubles with the Staffords).

Holland helped the king take down Thomas of Woodstock and Richard Fitzalen, Earl of Arundel in 1397. He was rewarded by being created Duke of Exeter on September 29.

He then went with Richard on the king's 1399 Ireland expedition. When they returned the king sent him to try to negotiate with Holland's brother-in-law Henry Bolingbroke. After Henry deposed Richard and took the throne (as Henry IV), he called to account those who had been involved in the downfall of Thomas of Woodstock, and in the end took away all rewards Richard had give them after Thomas' arrest. Thus Holland became again merely Earl of Huntingdon.

Early the next year Holland entered into a conspiracy with his nephew Thomas Holland, Earl of Kent, Thomas le Despenser, and others. Their aim was to assassinate king Henry and return Richard (who was in prison) to the throne. Their plot failed, Holland fled, but was caught and executed. Among those who witnessed the execution was Thomas Fitzalen, Earl of Arundel and Surrey, son of the Earl of Arundel who Holland had arrested some years before.

Holland's lands and titles were forfeited, but eventually they were restored for his second son John Holland, 2nd Duke of Exeter.
1353 Margaret de Holand 1270 - 1328 Robert de Holand 58 58 1280 - 1349 Maude la Zouche 69 69 1312 - 1372 Robert de Holand 60 60 1319 Matilda de Holand 1324 - 1387 Elizabeth de Holand 63 63 1310 Maud de Holand 1267 - 1313 Alan la Zouche 46 46 1270 - 1314 Eleanor Segrave 44 44 1288 Elena la Zouche 1246 Ela Longespee 1242 - 1285 Roger la Zouche 43 43 1239 - 1337 Maud de Lacy 98 98 1311 - 1371 Eleanor Plantagenet 60 60 Eleanor of Lancaster (sometimes called Eleanor Plantagenet1) (about 1318 - 11 January 1371/2) was born in Arundel, West Sussex, England, the daughter of Henry, Earl of Lancaster (c. 1281-1345) and his wife Maud de Chaworth (1282- c. 1317).

Before June 1337, she married John de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan, 2nd Lord Beaumont, son of Henry de Beaumont (c. 1288 - bef. 1340) and his wife Alice Comyn (c. 1291-1349).

They had two children, Henry (1340-1369), who succeeded his father as Lord Beaumont, and Matilda.

John de Beaumont died in a tournament on 14 April 1342.

On 5 February 1344/1345 at Ditton Church, Stoke Poges, Buckingham, she married Richard FitzAlan, 3rd Earl of Arundel, 4th Earl of Surry, known by the soubriquet of "Copped Hat", Justiciar of North Wales, Governor of Carnarvon Castle, Admiral of the West. His previous marriage, to Isabel le Despenser, had taken place when they were children. It was annulled by Papal mandate as she, since her father's attainder and execution, had ceased to be of any importance to him. The Pope obligingly Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel (d. January 24, 1376) was an English nobleman and military commander.

He was the son of Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice Warenne. His birthdate is uncertain, but was not before 1307.

Around 1321 Richard's father allied with king Edward II's favorites the Despensers, and Richard was married to Isabella, daughter of the younger Hugh le Despenser. Fortune turned against the Despenser party, and in 1326 Richard's father was executed, and Richard did not succeed to his father's estates or titles.

However by 1330 political conditions had changed, and over the next few years Richard was gradually able to reaquire the earldom of Arundel as well as the great estates his father had held in Sussex and in the Welsh Marches. Beyond this, in 1334 he was made justice of North Wales (later his term in this office was made for life), sheriff for life of Carnarvonshire, and governor of Carnarvon Castle.

Despite his high offices in Wales, in the following decades Arundel spent much of his time fighting in Scotland and France. In 1337 he was joint commander of the English army in the north, and the next year he was made the sole commander.

In 1340 he fought at the Battle of Sluys, and then at the siege of Tournai. After a short term as warden of the Scottish Marches, he returned to the continent, where he fought in a number of campaigns, and was appointed joint Lieutanant of Aquitaine in 1340.

Arundel was one of the three principal English commanders at the Battle of Crecy. He spent much of the following years on various military campaigns and diplomatic missions.

In 1353 he succeeded to the Earldom of Surrey (or Warenne), which even further increased his great wealth. (He did not however use the additional title until after the death of the dowager countess of Surrey in 1361.) He made very large loans to Edward III but even so on his death left behind a great sum in hard cash.

Arundel married twice. His first wife (as mentioned above), was Isabella Despenser. He repudiated her, and had the marriage annulled on the grounds that he had never freely consented to it. After the annullment he married Eleanor of Lancaster, daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Leicester.

By his first marriage he had one daughter. By the second he had 3 sons: Richard, who succeeded him as earl; John, who was a Marshall of England, and drowned in 1379; and Thomas Arundel, who became Archbishop of Canterbury. He also had 2 surviving daughters by his second wife: Joan, who married Humphrey de Bohun, earl of Hereford, and Alice, who married Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent.
annulled the marriage, bastardized the issue, and provided a dispensation for his second marriage to the woman with whom he had been living in adultery (the dispensation, dated 4 March 1344/5, was required because his first and second wives were first cousins.

The children of Eleanor's second marriage were:
Richard (bef. 1347-1397), who succeeded as Earl of Arundel
John (bef 1349-1379)
Thomas Arundel, Archbishop of York (c. 1352-)
Joan (bef. 1351-1419)
Alice (1352-1416)

Eleanor died at Arundel and was buried at Lewes Priory in Lewes, Sussex, England.

1313 - 1375 Richard de Arundel FitzAlan 62 62 Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel (d. January 24, 1376) was an English nobleman and military commander.

He was the son of Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice Warenne. His birthdate is uncertain, but was not before 1307.

Around 1321 Richard's father allied with king Edward II's favorites the Despensers, and Richard was married to Isabella, daughter of the younger Hugh le Despenser. Fortune turned against the Despenser party, and in 1326 Richard's father was executed, and Richard did not succeed to his father's estates or titles.

However by 1330 political conditions had changed, and over the next few years Richard was gradually able to reaquire the earldom of Arundel as well as the great estates his father had held in Sussex and in the Welsh Marches. Beyond this, in 1334 he was made justice of North Wales (later his term in this office was made for life), sheriff for life of Carnarvonshire, and governor of Carnarvon Castle.

Despite his high offices in Wales, in the following decades Arundel spent much of his time fighting in Scotland and France. In 1337 he was joint commander of the English army in the north, and the next year he was made the sole commander.

In 1340 he fought at the Battle of Sluys, and then at the siege of Tournai. After a short term as warden of the Scottish Marches, he returned to the continent, where he fought in a number of campaigns, and was appointed joint Lieutanant of Aquitaine in 1340.

Arundel was one of the three principal English commanders at the Battle of Crecy. He spent much of the following years on various military campaigns and diplomatic missions.

In 1353 he succeeded to the Earldom of Surrey (or Warenne), which even further increased his great wealth. (He did not however use the additional title until after the death of the dowager countess of Surrey in 1361.) He made very large loans to Edward III but even so on his death left behind a great sum in hard cash.

Arundel married twice. His first wife (as mentioned above), was Isabella Despenser. He repudiated her, and had the marriage annulled on the grounds that he had never freely consented to it. After the annullment he married Eleanor of Lancaster, daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Leicester.

By his first marriage he had one daughter. By the second he had 3 sons: Richard, who succeeded him as earl; John, who was a Marshall of England, and drowned in 1379; and Thomas Arundel, who became Archbishop of Canterbury. He also had 2 surviving daughters by his second wife: Joan, who married Humphrey de Bohun, earl of Hereford, and Alice, who married Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent.

1346 - 1397 Richard FitzAlan de Arundel 51 51 Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel and 10th Earl of Surrey (1346 – September 21, 1397) was an English nobleman and military commander.
He was the son of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor of Lancaster and was born in 1346. He succeeded his father on January 24, 1376. His brother was Thomas Arundel who was Bishop of Ely from 1374 to 1388, then Archbishop of York from 1388 to 1397, then Archbishop of Canterbury.

At the coronation of Richard II, Richard FitzAlan carried the crown.

In 1377 he was Admiral of the West and South. In this capacity, he attacked Harfleur at Whitsun 1378, but was forced to return to his ships by the defenders. Later, he and John of Gaunt attempted to seize Saint-Malo but were unsuccessful.

FitzAlan was closely aligned with Thomas, Duke of Gloucester who was an uncle of Richard II. Thomas was opposed to Richard II's desire for peace with France in the Hundred Years War and a power struggle between Gloucester and Richard II ensued. In late 1386, Gloucester forced Richard II to name both himself and Richard FitzAlan to Richard's Council. This council was to all intents and purposes a regency council for Richard II, however Richard limited the duration of the council's powers to be one year.

In 1386 Richard II named him Admiral of all England, as well as being knighted a Knight of the Garter. As Admiral of All England, he defeated a Franco-Spanish-Flemish fleet off of Margate in March 1387, along with the Thomas de Mowbray, earl of Nottingham. In August, the king dismissed Gloucester and FitzAlan from the council and replaced them with his own favorites - including Archbishop Alexander Neville of York, the Duke of Ireland Robert de Vere, Michael de la Pole the earl of Suffolk, Sir Robert Tresillian who was the chief justice, and the former mayor of London Nicholas Brembre. The king summoned Gloucester and FitzAlan to meet with the king, but instead of coming, they raised troops and defeated the new council at Radcot Bridge, taking the favorites prisoner. The Merciless Parliament the next year condemned the favorites. Richard was one of the Lords Appellant who accused and condemned Richard II's favorites. He was named Governor of Brest in 1388.

Peace was concluded with France in 1389, however Richard FitzAlan followed Gloucester's lead and stated that he would never agree with the peace that had been concluded.
Arundel married twice. His first wife was Elizabeth de Bohun, daughter of William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton. They married around September 28, 1359.

Arundel then married Philippa Mortimer, daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March. Her mother was Philippa Plantagenet, a daughter of Lionel of Antwerp and thus a granddaughter of Edward III. They had no children.
On July 12, 1397 he was arrested for his opposition to Richard II, as well as plotting with Gloucester to imprison the king. He stood trial at Westminster and was attainted.[8] He was beheaded on September 21, 1397 and was buried in the church of the Augustin Friars, Bread Street, London. In October of 1400, the attainter was reversed, and Richard's son Thomas succeeded to his father's estates and honors.
(Wikipedia)

Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Earl of Surrey, son of Richard FitzAlan and Eleanor Plantagenet, and was born 1346. He was bearer of the crown at the coronation of Richard II, July 16, 1377, and was a member of the Council, was made Admiral of the West and South Fleet in 1377, and subsequently, 1386, of all England, and Knight of the Garter in the same year. He distinguished himself in the French Wars, gaining a brilliant naval victory over allied French, Spanish and Flemish fleets, off Margate, March 24, 1387, and was made Governor of Brest 1388. Together with the Duke of Gloucester he took an active part against the King, Richard II, who in 1388 was entirely in that Duke's power. In 1394 he obtained pardon for all political offenses, but was treacherously seized July 12, 1397, tried at Westmoreland, and beheaded in Cheapside Sept. 21, 1397. (Footnote says: "No more shrinking or changing colour than if he were going to a banquet.") He married (contract dated Sept. 28, 1359) Elizabeth de Bohun, who died April 3, 1385, and was buried at Lewes.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 535-536)
1347 Joan FitzAlan 1353 Thomas Arundel 1300 - 1359 John de Grey 58 58 1312 - 1378 Avice de Marmion 66 66 1319 John de Grey 1347 Maud de Grey 1300 Katherine ferch Brian 1271 - 1311 John de Grey 40 40 Sir John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey, was summoned to Parliament 26 Jan., 1296/7, 25th of Edward I, and to a council, and summoned to military service from March, 1298, to Sept., 1299. He was an executor of Edmund, Duke of Cornwall; was present at the siege of Carlaverock. He was 24 in 1295. He appears to have taken part in the Scottish wars of Edward I. He married Margaret, 4th and youngest daughter of William de Odingsells, of Maxtock, County Warwick, and Ela, his wife, sister and co-heir of Edmund, of Solihull and Maxtock, County Warwick. His widow had assignment of dower 20 Jan., 1311, and license to marry whom she chose 10 June, 1312. She married 2nd, circa 1319, Robert de Moreby. Sir John de Grey died 5th of Edward II, 1312, and was succeeded by his son, Sir John de Grey, 2nd Baron Grey.
1248 - 1295 Robert de Grey 47 47 1250 Joan de Valoines 1253 Thomas de Grey 1222 - 1267 Walter de Grey 45 45 Walter de Gray (died 1 May 1255), English prelate and statesman, was a nephew of John de Gray, bishop of Norwich, and was educated at Oxford.

He owed his early and rapid preferment in church and state to the favor of King John, becoming the king's chancellor in 1205, and being chosen bishop of Lichfield in 1210. He was, however, not allowed to keep this bishopric, but he became bishop of Worcester in 1214, resigning his office as chancellor in the same year. Gray was with John when the king signed the Magna Carta in June 1215; soon after this event he left England on the king's business, and it was during his absence that he was forced into the archbishopric of York, owing his election to the good offices of John and of Pope Innocent III.

He took a leading part in public affairs during the minority of Henry III, and was regarded with much favor by this king, who employed him on important errands to foreign potentates, and left him as guardian of England when he went to France in 1242. Afterwards the archbishop seems to have been less favorably disposed towards Henry, and for a time he absented himself from public business; however, in 1255, he visited London to attend a meeting of parliament, and died at Fulham on the 1st of May 1255. Gray was always anxious to assert his archiepiscopal authority over Scotland, and to maintain it against the archbishop of Canterbury, but in neither case was he very successful. He built the south transept of the minster at York and bought for his see the village, afterwards called Bishopthorpe, which is still the residence of the archbishop of York. He was also generous to the church at Ripon. Gray was regarded by his contemporaries as an avaricious, but patriotic man.

1224 Isabel de Duston 1206 Robert de Grey 1192 Amice St. Luke 1193 William de Duston 1210 de Wake 1166 - 1234 William de Duston 68 68 1174 Jane Noel 1151 - 1206 Thomas Noel 55 55 1180 - 1235 Margaret le Strange 55 55 1182 - 1235 Alice Noel 53 53 1127 Robert Noel 1127 Alice de Montfort 1072 - 1124 Hugh de Montfort 52 52 Hugh de Gant de Montfort was living 1124. On account of his mother being so great an heiress, assumed the name of Montfort, and inherited all the possessions of his grandfather, Hugh, who came with William, the Conqueror. This Hugh having married Adeline, daughter of Robert, Earl of Melleunt and Bellomont, and his wife Isabel de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh Magnus, 1st Crusader, son of Henry I, King of France, and Anne of Russia. He joined with her brother Waleran, and all of those who endeavored to advance William, called Clito, son of Robert of Normandy (1st Crusader), against Henry I, in 1124, and entering Normandy for that purpose, he was made a prisoner with the said Waleran, and confined for 14 years ensuing. The time of his death is not ascertained, but he left issue: Robert, Thurstan, Adeline and Ada. Robert, the elder son, died 1141, succeeded his father, but does not appear to have left any issue, as he was succeeded by his brother Thurstan.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 355)

HUGH DE MONTFORT, called Hugh the fourth, who having assumed the surname of his mother's family inherited all the possession of his grandfather. Married Adeline, a daughter of Robert, Earl of Millent. He joined with Waleran, her brother, and all those who endeavored to advance the cause of William, son of Robert-Curthose, against King Henry I, in 1124. While in Normandy for this purpose, he and said Waleran were made prisoners and confined as such for 14 years. The time of his death is unknown. His four children: 1. Robert De Montfort, fought and vanquished Henry de Essex, the king's standard bearer, having first charged him with cowardice, in fleeing from his colors in 1163. He does not appear to have had any issue, for he was succeeded at his decease by his brother. 2. Thurstane de Montfort, he succeeded his brother, 3. Adeline De Montfort, married William de Britolio, 4. A daughter married to Richard, son of the Earl of Gloucester.
(Tracy Winslow Families, page 48)
1102 Adeline de Beaumont 1117 Peter de Montfort 1287 - 1335 John de Marmion 48 48 1285 - 1360 Maud de Furnival 75 75 1310 - 1362 Joan de Marmion 52 52 1250 - 1322 John de Marmion 72 72 1270 Isabel 1212 Lorette Dover 1224 - 1276 William de Marmion 52 52 1195 - 1242 Robert de Marmion 47 47 1205 Avice de Tanfield 1150 Maud de Beauchamp 1156 - 1218 Robert de Marmion 62 62 1133 - 1181 Robert de Marmion 48 48 ROBERT MARMION, son and heir. All the land of Roger his grandfather and Robert his father was restored to him by Stephen. In 1155 he obtained from Henry ll a charter of freewarren in Warwickshire, especially at Tamworth, as his ancestors had had it in the time of Henry I, and after 1170 he had from King Henry-i.e. the eldest son of Henry II-a charter of free warren in all his land of Lindsey. In 1166 he was holding over 16 knights' fees. He granted Avon and Ditchampton, Wilts, and the honour of Llanstephan, co. Carmarthen, which had belonged to Roger his grandfather, to his uncle Geoffrey, in exchange for the latter's right in Winteringliam and Scrivelsby, co. Lincoln, and in the fee of Manasser Marmion. He granted the church of Checkenden, co. Oxford, to Coventry Priory, circa I170-75, in satisfaction of the injuries done to that house by his father; and, circa 1175-80, he granted a third part of Checkenden to Geoffrey Marmion, whose relationship is not specified. He began the foundation of Barbery Abbey in Normandy. He is said to have married Elizabeth, whose parentage is unknown. He died in or before October 1181. [CP 8:508-9, 14:468]
1124 Elizabeth de Rethel 1092 Elizabeth Isabell de Namur 1088 - 1124 Gervais de Rethel 36 36 1045 Melisende de Montlhery 1030 - 1118 Hugues de Rethel 88 88 1058 - 1131 Baldwin de Rethel 73 73 1080 Beatrice de Rethel 0992 - 1056 Manasses de Rethel 64 64 0990 - 1081 Judith de Roucy 91 91 0975 Manasser de Rethel Dada de Macon 0956 - 0990 Giselbert of Roucy 34 34 1256 - 1332 Thomas de Furnival 76 76 1254 - 1322 Joan le Despencer 68 68 1238 - 1291 Thomas de Furnival 53 53 1242 - 1331 Sarah Furnival 89 89 1200 - 1267 Bertha de Ferrers 67 67 Berta (married 2nd Ralph (le) Bigod (d. by 28 July 1260), 3rdson of 3rd Earl of Norfolk). [Burke's Peerage]

----------------------

Sir Thomas DE FURNIVALLE (g), by Berta, his wife (h). [CompletePeerage V:580-1, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(h) This Berta was living 10 Feb 1266/7. She had m. 2ndly Ralphle Bigod, whose widow she was, 28 July 1260.
1198 - 1291 Thomas de Furnival 93 93 1223 - 1265 Hugh le Despencer 42 42 1st Baron le Despencer
He was an important ally of Simon de Montfort during the reign of Henry III. He served briefly as Justiciar of England in 1260 and as Constable of the Tower of London.
He was summoned to Parliament by Simon de Montfort, and so might be deemed a baron, though the legality of that assembly is doubtful. He remained allied with Montfort to the end, and was present at the Battle of Lewes. He was killed fighting on de Montfort's side at the Battle of Evesham. He was slain by Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore; this caused a feud to begin between the Despenser and Mortimer families.
By his wife, Aline Bassett, he was father of Hugh the elder Despenser.
(Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Hugh de Spenser, born in or before 1223. He had Loughborough. Burton, Freely, and Arnesby in Co. Leicester; Parlington and Hillam in Co. York; Sibsey and Aukborough in Co. Lincoln; Ryhall and Belmesthorpe in Rutland. He took part with the barons and was nominated under the baronial power in 44th of Henry III, 1260, Justiciary of England. After the battle of Lewes he was one of those to whom the custody of the captive monarch was committed, and he was entrusted with the castles of Orford in Suffolk, of Devises in Wilts and Barnard Castle in Duram. He was summoned to Parliament on Dec. 14, 1264, as "Hugh le Despenser Justic' Angliae" and lost his life under the baronial banner at Evesham, where he joined the Earl of Leicester and was slain with him Aug. 4, 1265, and was buried in Evesham Abbey. His lordship married Aliva, daughter of Philip Bassett of Wycomb, Co. Bucks, by whom he left at his decease Hugh, of whom presently, and a daughter Alinore. Aliva's mother was Hawise, daughter of Sir Matthew de Lovaine of Little Easton in Essex. Some Genealogists say she was a daughter of John de Grey. After the forfeiture and decease of Lord Despenser, his widow Aliva found such favor with the king, that she was enabled to retain a considerable proportion of his property, and at her death, in the 9th of Edward I (1729), it devolved upon her son Hugh, when he paid a fine of 500 marks.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 414)
1230 - 1281 Aline Basset 51 51 1260 - 1326 Hugh le Despencer 66 66 Hugh le Despenser ("The Younger Despenser"), 1st Lord (Baron) le Despenser of the 29 July 1314 creation, KB, associated with his father in the period of ascendancy over Edward II in the early 1320's but reckoned more deserving than his father of the hatred of the generality of the baronial class; convicted as a traitor and hanged 29 Nov 1326, when all his honours were forfeited. [Burke's Peerage]

---

Sir Hugh le Despenser, hanged and quartered 24 Nov 1326, Lord Despenser; m. 1306 aft. 14 June, Alianore de Clare (34-5). [Magna Charta Sureties]

---

Hugh and his father were favorites of King Edward II (a weak king) and helped him throw off the mastery of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster. Edward's reliance on the Despenser's drew the ire of his wife Isabel. She had become the mistress of Roger de Mortimer while on a diplomatic mission to France. In September 1326 the couple invaded England, executed the Despensers, and deposed Edward II in favor of his son, Edward III. Isabel was rumored to be involved in her husband Edward II's murder.
See Encyclopedia Britannica, Edward II.

1197 - 1237 Hugh de Spencer 40 40 Geoffrey de Spenser died 1251 and left a son Hugh, of whom further. (The references disagree on this generation. Burke says Hugh No. 7 on this line was a son of another Hugh probably the brother of this Geoffrey, but Collins definitely states Hugh No. 7 was son of Geoffrey.)
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 414)

Sir Hugh le Despenser (died 1238) held 11 manors in England: in Leicestershire, Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, and Rutland.
(Wikipedia)
1169 - 1238 Thomas le Despencer 69 69 1172 Rohese de Vere 1185 - 1242 Galfridus le Despencer 57 57 1185 Rohesia le Despencer 1181 Muriel le Despencer 1122 - 1209 Thurston le Despencer 87 87 1126 Lucia 1155 Geoffrey le Despencer 1150 Almaric le Despencer 1080 - 1140 Alice of Burgundy 59 59 1087 - 1171 William Talvace 84 84 # Note:

    [WILLIAM (TALVAS), only son and heir, became Count of Ponthieu in succession to his father, probably between 4 March 1105/6, when William and his father Robert de Bellême confirmed to the abbey of Marmoutier all its possessions in all their land and in Ponthieu, and 1110 or 1111, when William alone, as Count of Ponthieu, made a gift to the abbey of Cluny. In June 1119 Henry I restored to him all his father's lands in Normandy. He resigned Ponthieu to his son Guy, in or after 1126, but before 17 October 1129, but retained the title of Count of Ponthieu. In 1135 Henry I confiscated his Norman lands, whereupon William joined Geoffrey Plantagenet, with whom he invaded Normandy after the death of Henry I.
1058 - 1103 Eudes Capet- Burgundy 45 45 Eudes I, surnamed Borel and called the Red, (1058–23 March 1103) was duke of Burgundy between 1079 and 1103. Eudes was the second son of Henry of Burgundy and grandson of Robert I. He became Duke of Burgundy following the abdication of his older brother, Hugh I, who retired to become a Benedictine monk. Eudes married Sibylla of Burgundy (1065 - 1101), daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy.

An interesting incident is reported of this robber baron by an eyewitness Eadmer, biographer of Anselm of Canterbury. While Saint Anselm was progressing through Eudes's territory on his way to Rome in 1097, the bandit, expecting great treasure in the archbishop's retinue, prepared to ambush and loot it. Coming upon the prelate's train, the duke asked for the archbishop, whom they had not found. Anselm promptly came forward and took the duke by surprise, saying "My lord duke, suffer me to embrace thee." The flabbergasted duke immediately suffered the bishop to embrace him and offered himself as Anselm's humble servant.
He was a participant in the ill-fated Crusade of 1101.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

EUDES I, surnamed Borel, who succeeded his brother Hugh as Duke of Burgundy in 1078; died in 1102; married Mahaut, daughter of William le Grand, Count of Burgundy.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 98)
1065 - 1102 Sibylle de Bourgogne de Macon 37 37 1080 Helie Borel 1083 Florine de Bourgogne 1087 Henri de Bourgogne 1184 - 1271 Phillip Basset 87 87 Lord Bassett of Wicomb in County Bucks

PHILIP BASSET who was ultimately heir of Wycombe; adhered to Henry III and was the last man to quit the field at the battle of Lewes where the King was taken prisoner; died 56 Henry III.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 132)
1230 Hawise de Louvaine 1155 - 1217 Allan Basset 62 62 Baron of Wiccomb

ALAN BASSET, youngest son, had a confirmation from King John of several manors, among which was that of Wycombe in Buckinghamshire; died 17 Henry III.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 132)
1159 Aline de Grey 1122 - <1190 Philip Fitzrobert de Gai 68 68 1138 - >1193 Sedzilia de Berkeley 55 55 1190 - 1258 Matthew de Louvain 68 68 D. 1275 Muriel 1237 - 1302 Matthew de Louvaine 65 65 1170 - 1226 Godfrey de Louvain 56 56 1155 Alice de Hastings 1140 - 1190 Godfrey of Brabrant 50 50 1140 Margaret von Limbogh 1068 - 1190 Robert de Hastings 122 122 D. 1219 Maud de Flamville 1370 - 1452 William Willoughby 82 82 1367 - 1405 Lucy le Strange 38 38 1390 Thomas Willoughby 1348 - 1396 Robert de Eresby Willoughby 48 48 1355 - 1412 Alice Skipwith 57 57 1327 - 1372 John Willoughby 45 45 John de Willoughby, 3rd Lord (Baron) Willoughby de Eresby; bapt 6 Jan 1328/9; knighted by May 1347; thought to have assisted at Siege of Calais 1347; fought at Battle of Poitiers 19 Sep 1356, campaigning again in France 1359-60 and Gascony 1371; married by 1349 Cecily, 2nd daughter of Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, and died 29 March 1372. [Burke's Peerage]

-----------------------

BARONY OF WILLOUGHBY (III) 1349

JOHN (DE WILLOUGHBY), LORD WILLOUGHBY, or LORD WILLOUGHBY DE ERESBY, son and heir, was born at Eresby manor and baptised 6 January 1328/9 in the church of St. James, Spilsby. By indenture, May 1347, he, being then a knight, was to stay with the Prince of Wales with 5 men-at-arms for one year, being presumably with the Prince at the siege of Calais in 1347. Although a minor he was granted the wardship of his lands, 27 October 1349, and he had seisin thereof, 23 February 1349/50. He was summoned to Parliament from 25 November 1350 to 8 January 1370/1, by writs directed Johanni de Wilughby de Eresby, or Johanni de Wilughby. In 1355 he went to Gascony with the Prince; he fought at Poitiers, 19 September 1356; and was apparently left behind to take part in the government of Gascony when the Prince returned to England, April 1357. He also took part in the King's campaign in France, 1359-60, and in that of the Duke of Lancaster there, 1369; and served again under Lancaster at the siege of Montfont, in Gascony, early in 1371.

He married, before 1349, Cecily, sister and (in her issue) coheir of William (DE UFFORD), 2nd EARL OF SUFFOLK, 2nd but 1st surviving daughter of Robert, 1st EARL OF SUFFOLK, by Margaret, great-aunt and (in her issue) heir of John (de Norwich), 2nd Lord Norwich, daughter of Sir Walter DE NORWICH, of Sculthorpe, Norfolk. She died before him. He died 29 March 1372, aged 43, and was buried at Spilsby. [Complete Peerage XII/2:659-60, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]
Cecilie de Ufford 1298 - 1369 Robert de Ufford 71 71 Robert de Ufford, second Baron, was Knight of the Garter, and was summoned to Parliament 27 Jan., 1332, to 14 Jan., 1337. This nobleman was in the wars of Gascony in the reign of Edward II, in requittal of his eminent services, a grant for life of the Town of Orford, County Suffolk, and soon afterward further considerable possessions, also by grant from the crown in consideration of the personal danger he had incurred in arresting, by the king's command, Mortimer and some of his adherents in the Castle of Nottingham. (This Mortimer was the favorite of Isabel, Queen of Edward II. She was the daughter of the King of France and through her Edward III claimed the French throne. E. E. W.) His lordship was solemnly advanced in the Parliament to the dignity of Earl of Suffolk, 16 March, 1336, "habendum sibi et haere bibus suis," whereupon he was associated with William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton, and John Darcy, Stewart of the King's household, to treat with David Bruce of Scotland, touching a league of peace and amity, and the same year going beyond the sea on the King's service had an assignment of 300 œ out of the Exchequer towards his expenses in that employment, which was in the wars of France for it appears that he then accompanied the Earl of Derby (this was William Ferrers, 7th Earl of Derby, whose 2nd son, William Ferrers, of Groby, married Margaret, daughter this Robert Ufford. E. E. W.), being with him at the Battle of Cagant, after which time he was seldom out of some distinguished action. In the 12th of Edward III, 1338, being in the expedition into Flanders, he was the next year one of the marshals when King Edward beseiged Cambrai, and his lordship, within a few years, subsequently was actively engaged in the wars in Brittany. In the 17th of this reign the Earl of Suffolk (Robert de Ufford) was deputed to the Court of Rome, there to treat in the presence of his holiness, touching an amicable peace and accord between the English monarch and Philip of Valois of France. He marched the same year with Henry of Lancaster, Earl of Derby, the relief of Loughmaben Castle, then beseiged by the Scots. Soon after this he was made admiral of the king's whole fleet northward. For several years subsequently his lordship was with King Edward in France and he was one of the persons presented by that monarch with harness and other accoutrements for the tournament at Canterbury in 22nd of that reign. In seven years afterwards we find the Earl again in France with the Black Prince, and at the celebrated Battle of Poictiers fought and so gloriously won in the following year his lordship achieved the highest military renown by his skill as a leader and his personal courage at the head of his troops. He was later elected a Knight of the Garter. He married Margaret, sister of Sir John Norwich (there is a line in some of the books that runs from the Norwich family to the Magna Carta Baron de Huntingfield, but it is disproved in Browning's Magna Carta Barons and Their Descendants), and had issue Robert, dvpsp, William, Cecilie, Catherine and Margaret. The Earl's last testament bears date 1368 and he died the following year. Amongst other bequests he leaves to his son William "the sword wherein the king girt him when he created him an earl, and also his bed, with the eagle entire, and his summer vestment, powdered with leopards. He was succeeded by his son William, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, Knight of the Garter, who died sine prole, and the barony fell into abeyance between his sisters.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 825-826)
1310 - 1375 Margaret Norwich 65 65 1279 - 1316 Robert d'Ufford 37 37 Sir Robert de Ufford, first Baron, Knight, who was summoned to Parliament as a Baron from 13 Jan., 1308, to Dec. 19, 1311. His lordship was in the expedition made into Scotland in 34 of Edward I, 1306. He married Cecily, one of the daughters and co-heirs of Sir Robert de Valoines, Knight, Lord of Walsham, and had issue Robert, John, Ralph and Edmund. He died 1316.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 825)
1279 Cecily Valoines 1310 Alice Ufford 1249 - 1298 Robert d'Ufford 49 49 Robert de Peyton de Ufford, his younger son, who, assuming his surname from the lordship of that name in that shire, became Robert de Ufford. Sir William Dugdale says of this family, which afterwards arrived to such great honour, there had not been anything memorable until the 53rd year of Henry III, 1268, when Robert de Peyton de Ufford was made Justice of Ireland by Henry III, and again in the reign of Edward I. He married Mary, widow of William de Say, and dying in 26 of Edward I, 1296.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 825)
1257 Mary de Saye John de Peyton Agnes John de Peyton Reginald Fitzwalter Walter Malet 1045 - 1106 Robert Malet 61 61 Robert Malet (d. 1106?) was an English baron and a close advisor of Henry I. He was the son of William Malet, and inherited his father's great honor of Eye in 1071. This made him one of the dozen or so greatest landholders in England. According to the Domesday Book he held 221 manors in Suffolk, 32 in Yorkshire, 8 in Lincolnshire, 3 in Essex, 2 in Nottinghamshire, and 1 in Hampshire. He also inherited the family property in Normandy.

In 1075 Malet was sheriff of Suffolk, and helped suppress the rebellion of Ralph Wader. Afterwards, he appeared frequently at King William I's court. All changed with the accession of William II. By 1094 Malet's English lands had been taken away from him. The reasons are unknown, and no more is known of Malet's activities during William II's reign. Most likely he was in Normandy, and it may be that his falling out with William II was due to his preference for Duke Robert of Normandy in the rivalry between the two brothers.

Malet suddenly reappears three days after the death of William II in 1100, as a witness to Henry I's coronation charter. He must have been with Henry at the time of William's death, or rushed from Normandy when the word came. In any case, Malet soon regained his office as sheriff of Suffolk, and his honor of Eye. He was a close councilor of the king, and was appointed master chamberlain (probably the first to hold that office).

It used to be thought that Malet had some quarrel with the king, and again lost his lands, on the basis of some statements by Orderic Vitalis, but most historians now think Orderic confused Malet with his successor William. Instead it appears he remained in the king's confidence and held his lands until his death. He may have died at the battle of Tinchebrai, though no specific evidence supports this; he may in fact have lived on through 1107.
References
C. Warren Hollister, "Henry I and Robert Malet", Viator, Vol. 4, 1973, pp. 115-32
Cyril Hurt, "William Malet and His Family", Anglo-Norman Studies XIX
C. P. Lewis, "The King and Eye: A Study in Anglo-Norman Politics", English Historical Review, vol. 104, 1989, pp. 569-87

1067 de Corcelle D. 1121 William Malet William Malet, succeeded his father and is mentioned as a great benefactor to the Abbey of Glastonbury. (Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 165)

William Malet (10??-c. 1121) was the third of his family to hold the honour of Eye and the lordship of Granville. He was either the younger brother, son, or nephew of Robert Malet, in other words, either a son or grandson of the first William Malet. He forfeited his English lands and was banished sometime between his father's death (circa 1106) and 1113. Several other barons lost their lands in 1110, so that year is likely. The precise cause is not known, but probably it is connected with the conflicts between Henry and King Louis VI of France during that period.
(Wikipedia)
1098 Hugh Malet 1206 - 1272 William de Saye 66 66 1253 - 1295 William de Saye 41 41 William; born 20 Nov 1253; summoned to serve against Welsh 1277, 1282 and 1283, also to an embryonic form of Parliament 1283; married Elizabeth and died by 16 Sep 1295. [Burke's Peerage]

---

William de Say IV, probably by 2nd wife (stated without evidence), b. 20 Nov 1253, d. on or bef. 16 Sep 1295; m. Elizabeth, who survived him. [Magna Charta Sureties]

---

WILLIAM DE SAY IV, son and heir, was born 20 November 1253. The wardship of his father's lands and heir had been granted by the King to Poncius de Mora, King's merchant, in discharge of the King's debts to him; but by September 1273 William had bought the custody of the lands. On 27 July 1276 he was granted protection, being about to go to Ireland for 3 years. In 1277 he was summoned to be at Worcester on 1 July to serve in person against Llewellin Prince of Wales; John de Say seems to have served in his place. In 1282 and 1283 he was summoned to Worcester to serve against the Welsh. By writ dated 30 September 1283 he was summoned to attend the Parliament at Shrewsbury. In 1287 he was summoned to appear with horses and
arms at a military council at Gloucester: in 1294 to attend the King on urgent affairs immediately upon receipt of the writ, dated 8 June. On 14 June 1294 he was ordered to attend the King at Portsmouth on the affairs of Gascony; and on 15 July 1294 he was granted protection as going with Edmund the King's brother to Gascony. He married Elizabeth (b). He died on or before 16 September 1295. [Complete Peerage XI:473-4

---

Note: (b) After his death she was assigned as dower the manors of Cudham (Kent) and Hamsey (Sussex) with an annual payment from the manor of Birling (Kent).
1135 - 1214 Geoffrey de Say 79 79 1163 Alice de Vere 1182 - 1230 Geoffrey de Saye 48 48 1187 Alice de Chesney 1120 - 1194 Aubrey de Vere 74 74 Sir Aubrey or Alberic III, eldest son, was born before 1140, 3rd Baron by tenure of Kensington, Count of Ghines. For his fidelity to the Empress Maud (daughter of Henry I and mother of Henry II), he was confirmed by her in his inheritance of the Lord Chamberlainship and all his father's possessions. He was also given choice of several earldoms and selected that of Oxford. He died 1194. He married Lucia, daughter of William, 3rd Baron d'Abrancis.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 994)

Aubrey de Vere III (c. 1115-Dec. 1194) was created Earl of Oxford by the empress Matilda in July 1141. He inherited the barony of Hedingham on the death of his father Aubrey de Vere II in May 1141, when he was already Count of Guines by right of his wife Beatrice. He lost the latter title on the annulment of their marriage 1144-46. Earl Aubrey was little involved in national political affairs after this period. His attempt to divorce his third wife, Agnes of Essex, was a celebrated marriage case that Agnes appealed successfully to Pope Alexander III.
(Wikipedia)
1141 Agnes de Essex 1099 - 1163 Henry de Essex 64 64 1101 Cicely of Rayleigh 1096 Gunnor Bigod 1085 - 1133 Robert de Essex 48 48 1027 - 1086 Suain de Essex 59 59 1007 - 1071 Robert de Fitzwinmard 64 64 1248 Robert de Valoines Lord of Walsham
Sir Robert de Valoines, Knight
1256 Eve Criketot 1221 Robert de Valoines 1227 Rohesia le Blount 1194 John de Valoines 1202 Isabel de Creke 1174 - 1210 Agnes de Glanville 36 36 1163 Robert de Creke 1136 Robert de Creke 1109 Bartholomew de Creke 1197 - 1288 Robert le Blount 91 91 1202 Isabel de Odensels 1230 - 1316 William le Blount 86 86 1166 - 1235 Stephen le Blount 69 69 1170 Maria le Blount 1139 William de Cribetot 1145 Agnes le Blount 1126 Cecilia de Vere 1124 - 1185 William le Blount 61 61 1120 - 1188 Gilbert le Blount 68 68 1096 William le Blount 1097 Sarah de Munchesni 1126 Galiena le Blount 1071 Gilbert le Blount Alicia Colekirk 1029 Richard le Blount 1036 Gundella de Ferrers 1065 - 1139 Hubert de Munchesney 74 74 1061 Emma de Hedenton 1149 - 1216 William le Blount 67 67 1123 William le Blount 1325 - 1392 William Skipwith 67 67 1333 Alice Hiltoft 1345 Margaret Skipwith 1298 William Skipwith 1299 Margaret de Ormsby Fitzsimon 1260 John Skipwith 1278 Margaret Flinton 1225 John Skipwith 1228 Isabelle de Arches 1195 William Skipwith 1198 Alice Thorpe 1173 Reginald Skipwith de Bella 1135 Geoffrey Skipwith 1138 Marianna de Menethorpe 1125 Beatrix de Langton 1116 Patrick de Stuteville 1245 Herbert Flinton 1250 Cecilia de la Lynde 1248 - 1317 Walter de la Lynde 69 69 Of Broomfield; had five daughters, his coheiresses. 1250 Joan Neville 1228 Joan Cornhill 1303 William Hiltoft 1304 Alice de Muer 1247 William Hiltoft 1251 Agnes de Willoughby de Mumby 1268 Thomas de Willoughby de Mumby D. 1270 Margaret de Mumby 1245 - 1300 William de Willoughby 55 55 William (Sir); JP Lincs 1279-80; married c1250-60 Alice, eldest daughter and coheir of 1st and last Lord (Baron) Beke, of Eresby, Lincs, and died by 29 March 1300. [Burke's Peerage]

-------------------------

WILLIAM DE WILLOUGHBY, son and heir, as the result of a lawsuit, Michaelmas 1258, with his cousin (of the senior line), William son of Hugh de Willoughby, obtained by fine, 13 October 1259, legal recognition of his possession of the manor of Willoughby in the Marsh, with its appurtenances, to hold of the said William, son of Hugh, and his heirs for ever. He was granted free warren in his demesne lands, 20 February 1267/8, and claimed these rights at Quo Warranto proceedings in 1281; was ordered, August 1278, to aid the sheriff of Lincolnshire in conducting an enquiry about Flemish shipping coming to Boston, Lincs; and was active, with his father-in-law, as a justice in Lincolnshire, 1279-80.

He married, circa 1250-60, Alice, 1st daughter and coheir of John (BEKE), LORD BEKE, of Eresby, Lincs. He was living, September 1290, but died before 29 March 1300. Alice apparently survived her father, who died 1303-04, and died before May 1311. [Complete Peerage XII/2:657, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]
1254 - 1311 Alice de Beke 57 57 1242 - 1331 Sarah Furnival 89 89 1235 - 1303 John de Beke 68 68 1210 Walter de Beke 1217 Eva de Grey 1185 - 1245 Robert de Grey 60 60 1198 Beatrice de Sculcotes 1246 Hawise de Grey 1150 - 1198 John de Grey 48 48 1327 - 1382 Roger le Strange 55 55 Mother Joan de Ingham? 1310 Aline Fitzalan Joan le Strange 1170 - 1221 Robert de Vere 51 51 1167 Aubrey de Vere 1172 Henry de Vere 1406 - 1462 Alice Montagu 56 56 1400 - 1461 Richard de Neville 61 61 Neville, Richard, Earl of Salisbury (1400-1460), English soldier, who supported the Yorkist side during the Wars of the Roses. Neville was the son of Ralph Neville, 1st earl of Westmorland. In 1425 Neville married Alice, the only daughter of Thomas Montagu, 4th earl of Salisbury. Upon Montagu’s death in 1428, Neville inherited his holdings and assumed his title.

Neville was warden of both the western and the northern marches and from 1453 to 1455 was chancellor during the protectorate of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd duke of York. In 1459 he joined the Yorkists against King Henry VI, a Lancastrian, and participated in the Yorkist victory at Blore Heath in 1459. After the Yorkist defeat at Ludford later in the year, Neville was forced to seek refuge in France.

Neville returned to London in 1460 and after the king's capture at Northampton was made great chamberlain of England. But in December 1460, the night after the attle of Wakefield during which Richard Plantagenet was killed, Neville was captured by the Lancastrians and taken to Pontefract Castle, where he was murdered. His eldest son, Richard Neville, called the Kingmaker, was the 2nd earl of Salisbury in the Neville line and also earl of Warwick by marriage.

© 1993-2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Joan Neville Cecily Neville 1428 Richard Neville Thomas Neville 1431 John Neville 1433 George Neville Eleanor Neville 1442 Catherine Neville Ralph Neville Robert Neville Margaret Neville 1373 - 1405 Alianor de Holand 32 32 1388 - 1428 Thomas Montagu 40 40 1200 - 1257 Reynold de Mohun 57 57 1434 Joane Fitzhugh 1120 - 1190 Ralph de Glanville 70 70 Ranulph had 3 daughters, who were all coheirs, and no sons.

Founded Abbey of Butley.
Chief Justiciar of England during King Henry II.
Ambassador to Flanders.
Sheriff of Yorkshire, Westmorland, & Lancaster

---

Even though the Glanville family of Suffolk was described in some totaly false pedigrees as "Earls of Suffolk", the Glanvilles were not even a prominent family at that time. They were relatively minor nobles with moderate holdings in
Suffolk. Ranulph being the first of the family with any prominence.

The following posting was in soc.genealogy.medieval in response to a query about the Glanville "Earls of Suffolk", which is written about by Wm. Urmston S. Glanville-Richards, Esq. in 'Records of the Anglo Norman House of Glanville from AD 1050 to 1880', who describes three "Earls of Suffolk", which is totally false, and is described as "a classic example [e.g.] of 19th century antiquarian mayhem - built from a mass of unquestionably invaluable Glanville source material assembled into a dismally ill-considered narrative/pedigree. (The most blatant and - because it is so patently berserk - ultimately least crucial example being his persistently calling Ran(d)ulph, William and Gilbert de Glanville the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd 'Earls of Suffolk' when no such earldom existed). [Christopher Nash, 1 Sep 1998 posting to soc.genealogy.medieval newsgroup]":

From: Richard Borthwick (rgbor@cyllene.uwa.edu.au)
Subject: Re: Glanville line dead-ends before it really begins....
Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
Note: Date: 2000/04/06

Ranulph de Ganville (d.1190) was justiciar of England (but not earl of Sussex). His father was Hervey de Glanville (d.>1166), of Bawdsey and his mother was Mabel. His wife was Bertha dau. of Theobald de Valognes, of Parham Suffolk. Hervey's precise ancestry is problematic but is thought that he was the son of Robert (d.about 1150) son of Roger son of Robert noted in the Domesday survey.

Ranulph had three daughters and co-heirs: Matilda wife of William d'Auberville, Amabilla wife of Ralph de Aderne and Helewise wife of Robert fitz Ralph, of Middleham, Yorks.

References:
Mortimer, R "The Family of Rannulf de Glanville" *Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research* LIV (1981) 1-16;

S J Bailey "Ranulf de Glanvill and his Children" *Cambridge Law Journal* (1957) 163-182;
ibid. "Ranulf de Glanville in Yorkshire" (1958) 178-198;

West, F J *The Justiciarship in England 1066-1232* (Cambridge U P, 1966) 54; DNB VII:1292-1294;

K S B Keats-Rohan *Domesday People: A Prosopography of Persons occurring in English Documents, 1066-1166* (The Boydell Press: Woodbridge, 1999) I:376;

G Paget *An Official Genealogical and Heraldic Baronage of England* 3 vols. (Manuscript, pre-1957, in the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House, Strand, London), fam. no.11;

VCH Yorks NR I:218-219, 274, 378.

---

From: rphair@my-deja.com (rphair@my-deja.com)
Subject: Glanville line dead-ends before it really begins....
Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
Date: 2000/05/16

Kevan Barton and Kay Allen asked about Ranulf de Glanville's ancestry.

Ranulf de Glanville, appointed justiciar by king Henry II sometime during 1179-1180 [1], was never created an earl. His family's lands were in Norfolk and Suffolk counties and were of only minor importance[2]. Very little is known about his ancestry.

His father was Hervey de Glanville who was living 1148-53 and, perhaps, was still alive in 1166 or later [2]. Hervey was born in the 1090s or earlier, as implied by his speech at a local court [2]. Using an unspecified source, Mortimer claimed Hervey married Mabel -- [3].

Mortimer thought Hervey was the son of Robert de Glanville (alive c.1140) based upon two Coxford priory records [3]. The first one was an agreement dated by Mortimer, without explanation, as probably 1171 [4]; Hervey's confirmation of that agreement was the second record. Other records indicate Ranulf had probably succeeded before 1166 [2,6].
:
Mortimer's assumption that Robert was identical to the Robert who appears in charters of 1140-5 and c.1150 with his father Roger de Glanville [2] is chronologically implausible -- Roger, according to Mortimer's version, would have been Ranulf de Glanville's great- grandfather and at least 90 years old in 1140. The latter charter, if Mortimer's interpretation is accepted, would have had the unlikely situation of Ranulf (long before he was prominent) appearing in the witness list after his father but before his great-grandfather and grandfather. A more tenable identification of the Roger in these charters would be Hervey's brother Roger who had a son Robert [5,3].

An earlier Ranulf de Glanville and his successor Hervey de Glanville were benefactor and witness of Robert Malet's Eye priory during its foundation period 1086-1105/6 [6]. Their names and the observation that the justiciar and his father were witnesses of charters for the priory, suggests there might be a connection between the justiciar's family and these earlier Glanvilles.

The other Glanville family in 12th- and 13th-century east Anglia were descendants of William de Glanville who founded Bromholm priory in 1113 [3,7]. William and his descendants held some of the estates which had formerly been held by Robert de Glanville, a Domesday tenant of Robert Malet. Its not known whether Robert had any children, but it seems likely that William was a relative. Hervey with his son Ranulf (the future justiciar) witnessed a few charters for this other Glanville family, but the relationship, if any, between these two families has not been determined.

For more information about Ranulf's wife and 3 daughters see my 21 Feb 1999 posting "Ranulf de Glanville" (in which #6 Roger should have been numbered #8 and #8 Robert should have been #16).
1331 - 1403 Joane Fitzhugh 72 72 1322 Catherine de Ufford 1283 Eleanor de Furnival 1120 Adela de Montgomery 1100 Guy de Montgomery de Talvas 1152 Hugh le de Spencer 1330 Margaret de Ufford 1312 - 1370 Eve Ufford 58 58 John Ufford Edmund Ufford 1302 Ralph Ufford 1152 - 1208 Margery of Umfraville 56 56 1157 Robert Umfreville 1160 William Umfreville 1157 - 1206 William Bertram 49 49 William Bertram II, in 1196, occurs as son and heir of Roger, and accounts to the sheriff of that year for his barony, which then consisted of the parishes of Greatham, Felton, Mitford and Ponteland. He confirmed to the monks of Brinkburne all the grants which his grandfather William and his father Roger had made to them, and died about the year 1199. He married Alice, daughter of Odonell Umfreville, and sister of Robert Umfreville, who gave her the villes of Great Bavington and Kirklawe, with the service of Robert of Divellstone in North Milbourne, besides the forest of Ottercope and right of a free chase on certain lands on the west side of Rede, about Corsenside. William Bertram died in the 7th year of King John, 1206, for at that time we find King John conferring the wardship of his lordship's son and heir, Roger, upon Peter de Brus with the custody of his lands during his minority, in consideration of the sum of 300 marks.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 702-703)

WILLIAM BERTRAM who obtained a grant from the Crown, 5 John (1204), of the manor of Felton, in Northumberland; married Alice, sister of Robert de Umfravil; died before 7 John (1206), for in that year the wardship of his son Roger was conferred by King John upon Peter de Brus.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 166)
1184 - 1224 Aliva Bassett 40 40 1182 Hawise Bassett 1190 Gilbert Bassett 1195 - 1231 Katherine Bassett 36 36 1119 Thurstan de Montfort THURSTANE DE MONTFORT, who succeeded his brother, Robert and was enreoffed of several lordships by Henry de Newburgh, the first Earl of Warwick. At the chief seat of his family in Warwichshire he erected a castle of great strength, which he call Beldesert. He was succeeded by his eldest son: His two children: Henry De Montfort, eldest son and successor. Thurstand De Charlecto.
(Tracy Winslow Families, page 48)

---

Thurstan de Montfort, being enfeoffed of divers fair lordships by Henry de Newburgh, the 1st Earl of Warwick, erected a stony castle, called Beldesert, at the chief seat of his family in Warwickshire, which it continued for several subsequent ages. To this Thurstan, who d. before 1190, s. his son, Henry de Montfort. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage Ltd, London, England, 1883, p. 377, Montfort, Barons Montfort]

1112 Robert de Montfort 1252 - 1328 Eleanor le Despenser 76 76 1248 Anne le Despencer Robert Ufford William Ufford Edmund of Kent John of Kent 1165 - 1235 Henry of Germany 70 70 1084 - 1143 Hugh of Burgundy 59 59 Duke of Burgundy
He was duke of Burgundy between 1103 and 1143. Hugh was son of Eudes I, Duke of Burgundy. He married about 1115 to Felicia-Matilda of Mayenne, the daughter of Gauthier, Count of Mayenne, and Aelina de Presles. He was succeeded by the eldest of his six sons.
(Wikipedia)
1169 - 1210 Mabel Marmion 41 41 1090 - 1144 Robert de Marmion 54 54 ROBERT MARMION,[b] son of Roger MARMION, which Roger at the time of the Lindsey Survey, circa 1115-18, held land in Lincolnshire, rendered an account of 176£ 13s. 4d. for relief on his father's lands, of which 60£ had been paid by Michaelmas 1130. He was granted by Henry I, circa 1129-33, free warren in Warwickshire as his father had it, especially at Tamworth. With his wife Milicent he granted the church of Polesworth and other property to the nuns there, and the vill of Buteyate to Bardney Abbey. In 1140 Geoffrey, Earl of Anjou, besieged and destroyed his castle of Fontenay. A prominent figure in the anarchy of Stephen's reign, he evicted the monks of Coventry and profaned their church. He married Milicent, daughter of Hugh, Count of Rethel. He died in 1143 or 1144, being slain in warfare with the Earl of Chester. His widow married Richard DE CANVILLE or CAMVILLE. [CP 8:505-8, 14:467]

---

[b] The family of Marmion was of Norman origin, its chief property lying at Fontenay-le-Marmion in the département of Calvados. There are few families whose origin has given rise to more erroneous speculation. Of all the myths which have encumbered this family perhaps the most glaring and persistent has been that which makes William the Conqueror confer the castle of Tamworth on Robert Marmion, the "Champion of Normandy," to hold by the service of Champion in England.
1115 - 1152 Millicent de Rethel 37 37 1115 - 1152 Millicent de Rethel 37 37 0988 Ebles de Roucy 1210 Margery de Creke 1081 Ralph de Querceto 1177 William de Glanville 1095 - 1166 Hervey de Glanville 71 71 1098 Matilda Mabel 1065 - 1150 Robert de Glanville 85 85 Robert's proven ancestry is non-existence. There are indications that the lines were related in some fashion. But there are various opinions about how they are related. The line set out for Robert's brother Hervey, based on Moriarty, has Robert in it as an elder brother, but states that he dsp. The line with Robert as grandfather of Ranulph is based on R. Mortimer, "The Family of Rannulf de Glanville", 'Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research' LIV (1981) 1-16. .

---

Robert de Glanville, Feudal Lord of Bromholm, etc. (vi. A in Pedigree), was at the survey enfeoffed of several Lordships of the Honour of Eye in Suffolk. The following are the Extracts from "Domesday Book" relating to him:

---

"SUFFOLK: HUNDRED OF STOW.- Robert de Glanville holds Crating of Robert Malet, which Leuin, a freeman of Edric, the predecessor of Robert Malet, held in commendation. There is one carucate of land in the soke of the King and the Earl. There were always 6 bordars, and there was then one plough and a half, afterwards 1/2 a plough, and now two ploughs in demesne. There was then half a plough belonging to the men, 3 acres of meadow, and the 4th part of a mill. There were then 2 horses, now there are none. Now there are 4 steers, 14 hogs, and 43 sheep, and 6 freemen of the same. Leuin holds in commendation 12 1/2 acres. There was always 1/2 a plough among all, and there is a soke man of the same Edric of [i.e., holding] 28 acres. There was always 1/2 a plough. Then and afterwards the whole was worth 20 shillings; it is now worth 30 shillings." (D. B., pp. 304, 304b.)

---

"BOSEMERE HUNDRED.- In Crating is one freeman who, in the time of King Edward, was under the protection of Edric. There are 20 acres and 2 bordars; and there was then 1/2 a plough; now 1 ox, and 1 acre of meadow, and it is worth 3 shillings and 4 pence. Walter of Caen holds it. In the same is 1 freeman, and 1 1/2 acres, who was the man of a certain client of Edric's, and it is worth 2 shillings, and Robert de Glanville holds it." (D. B., p. 304b.)

---

"PLUMESGAT HUNDRED.- . . . . . In Gliemham is a freeman of Almicin(?). There are 15 acres, and they are worth 2 shillings. Robert de Glanville holds it. The soke is the Abbot's." (D. B., p. 308b)

---

"PLUMESGAT HUNDRED.- . . . . . In Benhal 4 freemen hold 8 acres in commendation, and they are worth 16 pence. They are in demesne. The soke is the Abbot's. In the same I freeman holds in commendation 1 acre and 1/2, and it is worth 6d. Robert de Glanville holds it. The soke is the Abbot's." (D. B., p. 309.)

---

"HUNDRED OF CARLEFORD.- . . . . . In Burch, Robert de Glanville holds one freeman, Wlunin, the Priest, who was under the protection of Edric, in the time of King Edward. There are 6 acres, and they are worth 12 pence; and 11 acres of freeland, and they are worth 11 pence." (D. B p. 315b.)

---

"HUNDRED OF PLUMESGAT.- Baldeseie (?) a berauite (barton) of Holeslea, which Robert de Glanville holds of R. Malet, 1 carucate of land. There were always 3 bordars. Then there was 1 plough and 1/2, now there are two. Then, it was worth 25 shillings, now it is worth 40 shillings, and it is one mile in length and 5 furlongs in breadth; and it returns 27 pence for gelt. In the same ville 17 freemen, under the protection of E[dric], held 60 acres of land in the time of King Edward. There were then 3 ploughs, now l 1/2, and 4 acres of meadow. It was then worth 10 shillings, it is now worth 12. In How, 1 freeman for the 4th part of 1 acre worth 2 pence." (D. B., p. 317b.)

---

"HUNDRED OF WILEFORD.- . . . . . In Alretun there were 31 freemen in the time of King Edward, now 34, under the protection of Edric, of these Godric, the predecessor of Swain, had the protection of 2 1/2, but W. Malet has been seised thereof, There is 1 carucate of land and 80 acres, and one bordar and 1/2. There were then 6 ploughs, now 5; and 20 acres of meadow. It was then worth 40 shillings, it is now worth 100s. There is a church, 24 acres, and 1 acre of meadow, and they are worth 4 shillings, and in Holeslea is a mill worth 12 shillings. All this Robert de Glanville holds." (D.B., p. 317b.)

---

"HUNDRED OF WILEFORD.- . . . . . In Carlesford, Robert de Glanville holds of Robert Malet, 24 freemen, [who were] under the protection of Edric in the time of King Edward. There are two carucates of land and 5 bordars. There were then 7 ploughs, now 4, and 4 acres of meadow. It was then worth 30 shillings, it is now worth 40, and it is one mile in length and 5 furlongs in breadth, and it returns 12 pence 1/2 for geld. Belonging to the church are 36 acres worth 3 shillings." (D. B., p. 319.)

---

"HUNDRED OF LOXA.- . . . . . In Dalingehow, Robert de Glanville holds of Robert Malet 4 freemen, under the protection of Edric. There are 80 acres and 17, and 1 bordar. There was always 2 ploughs and 2 acres of meadow. There is wood for 4 hogs. It was always 21 shillings." (D. B., pp. 327, 327b.)

---

"BISSOPES HUNDRED.- . .. .. Godwin held Berdefeld in the time of Edward for a manor. There are 4 carucates of land. There were then 18 bordars, now 23. There were always 2 ploughs in demesne. There were then 8 ploughs belonging to the men, now 9. There is wood for 200 hogs and 9 acres of meadow. There were then 2 nag-horses, now 1. There were then 9 steers, now 20. There were then 40 hogs, now 60, and 83 sheep. It was then worth £6, now £7. It is 6 furlongs in length and 8 in breadth, and returns 3 1/2d for geld. Edric held Stetebroc in the time of K. Edward. There are 5 1/2 carucates of land. Then and afterwards 16 villians, now 11. Then 11 bordars, now 30. Then 11 ploughs in demesne, afterwards 6, now 5. Then and
afterwards there were 12 ploughs. And Wingberg(?) to wit a barton in the same account and valuation. Now 5 ploughs, and 12 ploughs can be restored in all. There are 20 acres of meadow and wood for 400 hogs. There were then 5 nag-horses. There were then 16 hogs, now 30, and 30 sheep. There are two churches having 40 acres, and 1/2 a plough, and 17 sokemen having one carucate of land and 3 ploughs, wood for 40 hogs and 5 acres of meadow. The soke of these sokemen is in Hoxa, the Bishop's Manor, and Edric (The Dane) held half of the Bishop. It was then worth £14, it is now worth £16. And of this manor Walter holds 2 sokemen of 40 acres, and they are worth 8 shillings. Robert de Glanville 4 of 20 acres, worth 5 shillings in the same valuation; and Walter, the son of Grip, one of 15 acres, worth 30 pence in the same valuation; Leornic, one of 20 acres, worth 26 pence in the same valuation. Edric has the soke and sac. It is two miles in length and one broad, and
it returns 14 pence 1/2 for geld. Others hold there." (D. B pp. 328b, 329.)

---

"In Torstanestun are 6 acres, and they are worth 12 pence. Robert de Glanville holds this of William de Warena (?)." (D. B p. 400b.)

---

Robert de Glanville also held half a Knight's Fee of Norwich. [The measurements at this period are not the same as in the present day. A "lenca," or mile, far exceeded our standard English mile of 1760 yards. And an "acre" is a difficult thing
to explain.] [Ref: Records of the Anglo-Norman House of Glanville from A.D. 1050 to 1880, by Wm. Urmston S. Glanville-Richard, Esq. (London: Mitchell and Hughes 1882)
1145 - 1224 Gundred de Warenne 79 79 1134 - 1197 Hamo de Valoines 63 63 1164 Theobald de Valoines 1215 Pernell le Despencer 1225 Hawise le Despencer 1148 Walter le Despencer 1070 Urson D'Arbetot Despencer URSON D'ABTOT, or ABITOT, who, after the Conquest, was made hereditary Sheriff of Worcestershire and Constable of Worcester Castle, wherefore he is sometimes called "Urson de Wincestre;" 11 William I was created Earl of Worcester
1053 Gui de Ponthieu 1305 - 1362 Richard Willoughby 57 57 1260 - 1317 Robert de Willoughby 57 57 Robert de Willoughby, 1st Lord (Baron) Willoughby de Eresby, so created 26 July 1313 by writ of summons to Parliament made out to "Roberto de Wylghby" (ie. Willoughby) alone, the addition of "de Eresby" not occurring till the 1350-Jan 1370/1 Parliament of Edward III, and then only in the period 1350-60, presumably because a similarly named personage, Richard de Willoughby (a descendant), was also called to that Parliament, the next version of the title to include the suffix "de Eresby" occurring in 1580 (when the 2nd Baron Willoughby of Parham was sitting in Parliament), the Barony from then on being held with superior peerages till 1870 but referred to in the declaratory patent of 18 March 1780 as "Willoughby of Eresby" and only as "Willoughby de Eresby" from the 1871 termination of the abeyance onwards, though for conveniance's sake this form has been adhered to throughout this article; born c 1250-60; campaigned against Scots, being present at Siege of Carlaverock 1300; married by 1303 Margaret, daughter of 1st Lord (Baron) Deincourt, and died just prior to 25 March 1316/7. [Burke's Peerage]

------------------------

BARONY OF WILLOUGHBY OF ERESBY (I) 1313

ROBERT DE WILLOUGHBY, son and heir, born circa 1250-60, had a protection, going to Scotland with his great-uncle, the Bishop of Durham, 12 June 1298; was often summoned against the Scots, 1300-15; and took part in the siege of Carlaverock, July 1300. He is said to have been granted the manor of Eresby by his grandfather, John Beke, in 1301-02. He was summoned to Parliament from 26 July 1313 to 26 November 1313, by writs directed Roberto de Wylghby, whereby he is held to have become LORD WILLOUGHBY. On 16 October 1313, as a follower of Thomas of Lancaster, he was pardoned for his activities against Gavaston.

He married, in or before 1303, Margaret, daughter of Edmund (DEINCOURT), 1st LORD DEINCOURT, by Isabel, daughter of Sir Reynold DE MOHUN, of Dunster, Somerset. He died shortly before 25 March 1317. She died shortly before 18 October 1333. [Complete Peerage XII/2:657-8, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

1278 - 1333 Margaret Deincourt 55 55 1302 John Willoughby John de Willoughby, 2nd Lord (Baron) Willoughby de Eresby; born 6 Jan 1303/4; knight banneret Jan 1326/7; campaigned in Gascony, Scotland, Britanny and France, where present at Battle of Crecy 1346 and possibly also the ensuing Siege of Calais; married by 2 July 1323 Joan, daughter of Peter Roscelyn, of Edgefield, Norfolk, and died 13 June 1349. [Burke's Peerage]

---------------------

BARONY OF WILLOUGHBY OF ERESBY (II) 1317

JOHN (DE WILLOUGHBY), LORD WILLOUGHBY, son and heir, was born 6 January 1303/4 and was given seisin of his lands, having proved his age, 29 January 1326/7. He was made a knight banneret, 20 January 1326/7; had protections, 11 June 1330, going on the King's service to Gascony, and 1 October 1337, going with the Earl of Suffolk beyond seas; was summoned to Parliament from 27 January 1331/2 to 10 March 1348/9, for service in Scotland, 1333, 1335, 1340 and 1341, and to aid the King in Brittany, 20 December 1342; was with the King at Antwerp, July 1338, and remaining beyond seas, November following; and fought at Crécy, 26 August 1346, being also perhaps present at the siege of Calais in 1347.

He married, before 2 July 1323, Joan, sister and coheir of Thomas ROSCELYN, daughter of Peter ROSCELYN, of Edgefield, Norfolk. He died 13 June 1349, aged 45, and was buried at Spilsby, Lincs. His widow married, before 24 June 1351, William DE SYNYTHWAYT (? SWINITHWAITE). She was living, 15 October 1354. [Complete Peerage XII/2: 658-9, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

1309 Nicholas Willoughby 1314 Mary Mariota Willoughby 1305 Joan Roscelyn Joan, daughter of Peter Roscelyn, of Edgefield, Norfolk. [Burke's Peerage]

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Note: Page: 3032
1350 Margaret Willoughby 1260 - 1317 Robert de Willoughby 57 57 Robert de Willoughby, 1st Lord (Baron) Willoughby de Eresby, so created 26 July 1313 by writ of summons to Parliament made out to "Roberto de Wylghby" (ie. Willoughby) alone, the addition of "de Eresby" not occurring till the 1350-Jan 1370/1 Parliament of Edward III, and then only in the period 1350-60, presumably because a similarly named personage, Richard de Willoughby (a descendant), was also called to that Parliament, the next version of the title to include the suffix "de Eresby" occurring in 1580 (when the 2nd Baron Willoughby of Parham was sitting in Parliament), the Barony from then on being held with superior peerages till 1870 but referred to in the declaratory patent of 18 March 1780 as "Willoughby of Eresby" and only as "Willoughby de Eresby" from the 1871 termination of the abeyance onwards, though for conveniance's sake this form has been adhered to throughout this article; born c 1250-60; campaigned against Scots, being present at Siege of Carlaverock 1300; married by 1303 Margaret, daughter of 1st Lord (Baron) Deincourt, and died just prior to 25 March 1316/7. [Burke's Peerage]

------------------------

BARONY OF WILLOUGHBY OF ERESBY (I) 1313

ROBERT DE WILLOUGHBY, son and heir, born circa 1250-60, had a protection, going to Scotland with his great-uncle, the Bishop of Durham, 12 June 1298; was often summoned against the Scots, 1300-15; and took part in the siege of Carlaverock, July 1300. He is said to have been granted the manor of Eresby by his grandfather, John Beke, in 1301-02. He was summoned to Parliament from 26 July 1313 to 26 November 1313, by writs directed Roberto de Wylghby, whereby he is held to have become LORD WILLOUGHBY. On 16 October 1313, as a follower of Thomas of Lancaster, he was pardoned for his activities against Gavaston.

He married, in or before 1303, Margaret, daughter of Edmund (DEINCOURT), 1st LORD DEINCOURT, by Isabel, daughter of Sir Reynold DE MOHUN, of Dunster, Somerset. He died shortly before 25 March 1317. She died shortly before 18 October 1333. [Complete Peerage XII/2:657-8, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

1217 Robert de Willoughby Robert [2nd son, eldest Hugh, ancestor of Willoughbys, feudal Lords of Cumberworth, Lincs]; allegedly married ? Orreby, daughter of one of the feudal Lords of Orby and Ingoldmells, Lincs, and died between 3 Feb 1256/7 and 21 Feb 1257/8. [Burke's Peerage]

----------------------

ROBERT DE WILLOUGHBY, 2nd but 1st surviving son, succeeded defacto to the family estates, presented to Willoughby in the Marsh church in 1227 and appears as tenant of Gilbert de Gant in 1242. He was appointed, 23 June 1246, to aid in the custody of the royal escheats in Lindsey, where he was escheator, March 1255/6 and at his death; was granted exemption from juries and recognitions, 1252 and 1255; and on 3 October 1255 he was given free warren in his demesne lands. He is said to have married a lady from the family of ORREBY, lords of Orby and Ingoldmells, Lincs (g). He died between 3 February 1256/7 and 21 February 1257/8. [Complete Peerage XII/2:656, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(g) In 1242 Robert shared lands in Fenton, Lincs, with Fulk de Orreby, he was in a lawsuit with Gilbert de orreby, Feb 1256/7, and his grandson Robert was a co-heir and an executor of John de Orreby in 1316. G. A. Moriarty suggests that Robert de Willoughby's unnamed wife was probably a daughter of John de Orreby of Orby, son and heir of Herbert, son of Alard, otherwise Herbert de Orreby, for whom see ante, vol. X, p. 168, note "c". This John was ancestor (great-great-grandfather it would seem) of John de Orreby to whom Robert de Willoughby, grandson of Robert abovenamed, was coheir in 1316.
1225 Alice Margaret de Orreby 1190 William de Willoughby William de Willoughby; held land at Sloothby, Willoughby-in-the-Marsh, Lincs, temp. Richard I and a knight's fee at Willoughby-in-the-Marsh 1212; married Maud, daughter of William de Fulletby, and died by 1227. [Burke's Peerage]

----------------------

Observations.-In the 12th and 13th centuries there were two separate families of Willoughby holding lands in Lincolnshire. One, from whom the Lords Willoughby descended, took its name from Willoughby in the Marsh, in Lindsey, and the other from Silk Willoughby, in Kesteven. Both families were tenants of the Gant fee. As to the latter, Robert de Willoughby gave land in Silk Willoughby to the Templars before 1185; and, with his son Ralph in his place, had a quitclaim from Ralph de Stixwould of land there in 1199. Sir Robert son of Ralph de Willoughby gave a toft there to the church of Lincoln, circa 1240-50. This family also had an interest in Pleasley, co. Derby, where in 1203 the King confirmed land to John de Aincurt and Ralph de Willoughby and their wives, heirs of Serlo de Pleasley; and in 1219 it was recorded that William de Willoughby had been given the church of Pleasley jointly by his brother Ralph de Willoughby and John de Aincurt.

WILLIAM DE WILLOUGHBY, whose parentage is unknown, held land in Sloothby, in Willoughby in the Marsh, in the time of King Richard. He witnessed charters at the end of the 12th and early in the 13th centuries, two being issued by Gilbert de Gant; appears in law-suits in 1200 and 1202; served on juries in 1204 and 1205; held a knight's fee in Willoughby in the Marsh of Gilbert de Gant in 1212; and in September 1217 the sheriff of Lincolnshire was ordered to restore to him possession of his lands, as he had held them before the war. He is named in judicial activities, December 1220-16 August 1223; and in September 1221 he and others were ordered not to interfere with the tenure of Earl de Warenne in Stamford and Grantham. He m. Maud, daughter and coheir of William DE FULLETBY. He was living in 1225 but died before 1227. [Complete Peerage XII/2:654-6, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

1200 Maud de Fullerby 1160 Ralph de Willoughby 1125 Ralph de Brugge 1150 Richard de Willoughby 1100 Richard de Brugge 1070 Richard de Brugge 1170 William de Fullerby 1190 - 1230 Phillip de Orreby 40 40 1201 Leuca de Mohaut 1218 Fulke de Orreby 1220 Agnes de Orreby 1221 Clemence de Orreby 1160 - 1230 Phillip de Orreby 70 70 1165 Emme de Coventre 1130 Herbert de Orreby 1135 Agnes de Kyme 1168 Herbert de Orreby 1100 - 1150 Alard de Orreby 50 50 1110 Agnes 1094 Simon de Kyme 1105 Agnes de Lindsey 1074 Baldric de Lindsey 1064 William de Kyme 1034 Simon de Kyme 1040 Rafina 1004 William de Kyme 1010 Rafin 1135 Walter of Cheshire 1140 Margery de Coventre 1160 - 1229 Roger de Mohaut 69 69 1191 - 1260 Cecilia d'Aubigny 69 69 1248 - 1280 Isabel de Mohun 32 32 1244 - 1326 Edmund Deincourt 82 82 1266 John Deincourt 1274 Isabel Deincourt 1308 Joane de Grey 1350 - 1398 John Montague 48 48 1360 - 1424 Maude Francis 64 64 1383 Margaret Montagu 1385 Robertus Montagu 1389 Richard de Montagu 1395 Anne Montagu 1328 - 1397 William Montacute 68 68 1334 - 1414 Elizabeth Mohun 79 79 1320 John Mohun 1319 - 1404 Joan Burghersh 85 85 1269 - 1330 John Mohun 61 61 1290 - 1341 Christiane de Segrave 51 51 1321 Eleanor Margaret Mohun 1267 - 1342 Eleanor Fitzpiers 75 75 1251 John de Mohun 1228 Joan de Ferrers 1230 John Mohun 1277 - 1311 Margaret de Odingsells 34 34 1190 Juliana Cornhill 1203 - 1291 Margery de Umfreville 88 88 1152 William Torrington 1185 - 1264 Avice de Toriton 79 79 Matilda de Rethel 1270 Piers Roscelyn Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 3032
1275 Mabel 1245 - 1266 Thomas Roscelyn 21 21 1218 William de Roscelyn 1222 Letitia de Edisfield 1190 Peter de Edisfield 1190 Hawise 1165 William de Edisfield 1140 Peter de Edisfield 1140 Maud de Walcote 1110 Humphrey de Edisfield 1125 John de Chesney de Caiseneto Hist East Rudham: Coxford Priory Manor-William Cheney founded the church of St Mary of Rudham ,a priory,in the reign of King Steven,but was removed to a place more east called Coxford.

John De Caineto,Querceto,or de Cheyney, was a great benefactor,or founder of it ,for canons of the order of Sr Austin and dedicated to God. who gave them the churches of East and West Rudham,with their appertenanccs,and all the lay-land which the priest held-what Ralph de Querceta,his grandfather and William his son,held in perpetual alms;also the gardens of reke,Godwin ,Lambert,Wilmont,Warin,and Alman the mill, and pool, of Cokeford Cadwellwong,the water of Tatersel,and Kettleswang,and all Nowmerewaug,Ralph Fitz Ulmer,and his land,Burstan,and hillands ,etc and etc for the souls of his grandfather Ralph,and his wife,of his father and his wife,of William de Querceto(Cheney),his uncle,and his wife, and Roger and his wife,his sisters an d Waleran de Rochford.except only the service of the Earl Warren,as free as his father held it. this seems to have been between the years 1140 and 1149.

Some portion of this Manor passed to his daughters, as Hervey Beleth grandson thru Emma passed the Lordship of East Rudham to Coxford Manor on his death

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rlord335&id=I1455&style=TABLE
1219 William de Criketot Sources:
Abbrev: OneWorldTree
Title: OneWorldTree, Ancestry.com online [http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/pedigree.aspx?pid=1402848&st=1], accessed402848&st=1]igree.aspx?pid=1402848&st=1]. Accessed
Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 20 Apr 2008
Title: GEDCOM file submitted by S Hobbes 41512, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:a41512&id=I0962. Created on 18 JAN 2000. Imported on 20 Apr 2008.ncestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:a41512&id=I0962. Created on 18 JAN 2000. Imported on 20 Apr 2008.
William de Criketot Sources:
Abbrev: OneWorldTree
Title: OneWorldTree, Ancestry.com online [http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/pedigree.aspx?pid=1402848&st=1], accessed402848&st=1]igree.aspx?pid=1402848&st=1]. Accessed
 
 
1010 - 1089 Walcheline de Ferrers 79 79 Ferrers, the name of a great Norman-English feudal house, derived from Ferrières-St.-Hilaire, to the south of Bernay, in Normandie. Its ancestor Walkelin was slain in a feud during the Conqueror's minority, leaving a son Henry, who took part in the Conquest and held a great fief in the midlands. [Encyclopædia Britannica, 1961 ed., Vol. 9, p. 184, Ferrers]
1036 Henri de Ferrers 1123 William le Blount 1239 William Criketot 1219 William Criketot 1194 Pagan de Langton William de Menethorpe John Thorpe 1198 Robert de Arches Sources:
Title: GEDCOM File : mwballard.ged
Author: Mark Willis Ballard
Abbrev: Mark Willis Ballard
Abbrev: GEDCOM File : mwballard.ged
Note:
6928 N. Lakewood Avenue
773-743-6663
mwballard52@yahoo.com
Date: 4 NOV 2003
Title: GEDCOM File : !!June-2004-Sanders-Weaver-Lay.ged
Author: David William Weaver
Abbrev: David William Weaver
Abbrev: GEDCOM File : !!June-2004-Sanders-Weaver-Lay.ged
Note:
812-689-5624
dave@satcover.com
Date: 23 MAY 2004
Title: GEDCOM File : 8-08-04-Weaver-Sanders-Lay-Ancstry Tree.ged
Abbrev: GEDCOM File : 8-08-04-Weaver-Sanders-Lay-Ancstry Tree.ged
Date: 8 AUG 2004
Title: GEDCOM File : ALL-AN~1.ged
Abbrev: GEDCOM File : ALL-AN~1.ged
Date: 14 SEP 2004
Title: GEDCOM File : !!~!The One To Use-Weaver And Sanders.ged
Abbrev: GEDCOM File : !!~!The One To Use-Weaver And Sanders.ged
Date: 14 OCT 2004
1166 William de Arches Sources:
Title: GEDCOM File : mwballard.ged
Author: Mark Willis Ballard
Abbrev: Mark Willis Ballard
Abbrev: GEDCOM File : mwballard.ged
Note:
6928 N. Lakewood Avenue
773-743-6663
mwballard52@yahoo.com
Date: 4 NOV 2003
Title: GEDCOM File : !!June-2004-Sanders-Weaver-Lay.ged
Author: David William Weaver
Abbrev: David William Weaver
Abbrev: GEDCOM File : !!June-2004-Sanders-Weaver-Lay.ged
Note:
812-689-5624
dave@satcover.com
Date: 23 MAY 2004
Title: GEDCOM File : 8-08-04-Weaver-Sanders-Lay-Ancstry Tree.ged
Abbrev: GEDCOM File : 8-08-04-Weaver-Sanders-Lay-Ancstry Tree.ged
Date: 8 AUG 2004
Title: GEDCOM File : ALL-AN~1.ged
Abbrev: GEDCOM File : ALL-AN~1.ged
Date: 14 SEP 2004
Title: GEDCOM File : !!~!The One To Use-Weaver And Sanders.ged
Abbrev: GEDCOM File : !!~!The One To Use-Weaver And Sanders.ged
Date: 14 OCT 2004
1122 Robert de Arches