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Family Subtree Diagram : ..Rachel Sargent (1636)

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children) (a child) (three children) (a child) (five children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (eight children) (three children) (four children) (a child) (a child) (four children) (two children) (a child) (four children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (four children) (six children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (six children) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) 1602 - 1683 William Sargent 81 81 Sources:

   1. Repository:
            Name: Family History Library
            Salt Lake City, Utah 84150
            USA
            www.familysearch.org
      Title: International Genealogical Index
      Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
      Note: Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church.
      Search performed using PAF Insight on 08 Aug 2004
      Text: William Sargent; Male; Birth: 1602 , Old Rappahannock, Virginia; Death: 04 APR 1683; Spouse: William MRS. Sargent; Marriage: About 1632 Of, , Old Rappahannock, Virginia; No source information is available. 
1603 Hannah Sarah 1562 - 1649 Roger Sargent 87 87 Mayor of Northampton

Sources:

   1. Title: cotton.FTW
      Repository:
      Call Number:
      Media: Other
      Text: Date of Import: Oct 25, 2002 
1564 - 1645 Eleanore Makerness 80 80 # Reference Number: AFN8FNM-M4
# Ancestral File #: 8FNM-M4 1
# LDS Baptism: 12 Jan 1932 Temple: SLAKE - Salt Lake City, UT
# Endowment: 26 Feb 1932
# Sealing Child: 27 May 1969 Temple: OAKLA - Oakland, CA
# Note:

    Source includes, but is not limited to:"Ancestral File" and the "IGI", "International Genealogical Index", bothresource systems developed and solely owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of
    Latter Day Saints (JFN).
1530 - 1613 William Makerness 83 83 # Reference Number: AFN8LG2-R6
# LDS Baptism: 7 Mar 1969
# Endowment: 31 Mar 1969
# Sealing Child: 22 May 1969 Temple: OAKLA - Oakland, CA
# Change Date: 24 Mar 2000 at 22:08
# Note:

    Source includes, but is not limited to:"Ancestral File" and the "IGI", "International Genealogical Index", bothresource systems developed and solely owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of
    Latter Day Saints (JFN).
1532 Agnes Harrgat # Reference Number: AFN8LG2-SC
# LDS Baptism: 7 Mar 1969
# Endowment: 20 Mar 1969
# Change Date: 24 Mar 2000 at 22:08
# Note:

    Source includes, but is not limited to:"Ancestral File" and the "IGI", "International Genealogical Index", bothresource systems developed and solely owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
George Makernes Margery Makernes Richard Makernes Humpherey Makernes 1494 - 1544 William Makernes 50 50 # Reference Number: 8LG2-X2
# LDS Baptism: 7 Mar 1969
# Endowment: 24 Mar 1969
# Sealing Child: 13 Jun 1969 Temple: OAKLA - Oakland, CA
# Change Date: 24 Mar 2000 at 23:13
1498 1524 Thomas Makernes 1526 Joan Makernes 1540 Margaret Makernes 1542 Richard Makernes 1460 - 1515 John Makernes 55 55 # Reference Number: 8LG3-57
# LDS Baptism: 7 Mar 1969
# Endowment: 24 Mar 1969
# Change Date: 26 Mar 2000 at 21:39
1465 - 1533 Elizabeth 68 68 1491 Agnes or Annis Makernes 1496 Ellen Makernes 1503 Thomas Makernes 1505 Edmund Makernes 1507 Elizabeth Makernes 1530 - 1595 Hugh Sargent 65 65 1532 - 1594 Margaret Gifford 62 62 1508 - 1546 Nicholas Gifford 38 38 1510 - 1581 Agnes Anne Masters 71 71 1463 - 1542 Roger Gifford 79 79 1466 - 1542 Mary Nansicles 76 76 1495 George Gifford 1514 Dawnsty Gifford 1431 - 1506 John Gifford 75 75 1439 - 1506 Agnes Wyncelow 67 67 1461 Thomas Gifford 1470 Fongan Gifford 1408 - 1469 Thomas Gifford 60 60 1405 - 1470 Eleanor De Vaux 65 65 1367 - 1409 Roger Gifford 42 42 1339 - 1370 Elizabeth De Missenden 31 31 D. 1400 William de Stratele William Stretley 1289 - 1336 John Stretley 47 47 Elizabeth de Tydemarsh D. 1316 Hugh de Stretley Agnes de Neyernuit Geoffrey de Neyernuit D. 1276 Roger de Stretley Maud de Argentine William de Argentine 1370 - 1426 William Thomas Vaux 56 56 1374 - 1454 Eleanor Drakelowe 80 80 1345 - 1401 William de Vaux 56 56 1344 Joan Thirning 1309 - 1331 John Thirning 22 22 1320 Joan 1324 - 1372 William de Vaux 48 48 1325 Joan 1350 - 1378 Thomas Drakelowe 28 28 1356 - 1380 Ankaret de Salford 24 24 D. 1375 Peter de Salford Knight, served at Crecy.

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Sources:

   1. Abbrev: Blackmans of Knight's Creek
      Title: Blackmans of Knight's Creek
      Author: Henry James Young
      Publication: Carlisle, PA, 1980 
Joan 1320 - 1369 Thomas Drakelowe 49 49 1316 - 1420 Alice de Wileby 104 104 1400 - 1463 Thomas William Winslowe 63 63 1415 - 1458 Agnes Throckmorton 43 43 1372 - 1427 William Winslowe 55 55 1379 - 1443 Agnes Poure 64 64 1335 - 1375 John Wyncelowe 40 40 1337 - 1410 Mariota Crouchman 73 73 1300 William Winslowe 1297 William Crouchman 1300 - 1329 Egidia Greig 29 29 1346 - 1398 Thomas Poure 52 52 1350 - 1406 Joan 56 56 1320 William Poure 1382 - 1445 John de Throckmorton 63 63 John - was the lord of Throckmorton and Black Nauton, in county Worcester. Married Alianore, daughter and co-heir of Sir Guy de la Spine, of Coughton, Warwichshire. ... having been educated to the study of the law was ... Chamberlain of the Exchequer ... for which he bore the title of Under Treasurer of England.
1381 - 1466 Alianore de la Spine 85 85 1356 - 1412 Thomas de Throckmorton 56 56 1360 - 1428 Agnes de Besford 68 68 1339 - 1403 Alexander de Besford 64 64 1340 - 1404 Beatrice de Thornton 64 64 1335 Robert de Throckmorton 1334 Lucy Coleman 1350 Guy de la Spina 1354 Katherine Holt 1324 William de la Spine 1326 Alice Bruley 1324 John Holt 1328 Alianore Durvassal 1443 - 1477 William Nansicles 34 34 1446 Lucy 1468 Thomas Nauseglos 1470 William Nauseglos 1472 Elizabeth Nauseglos 1474 Alice Nauseglos 1420 William Nonsiglos 1441 Richard Nauseglos 1490 - 1558 John Maister 68 68 1492 - 1546 Elizabeth Payne 54 54 1515 Thomas Maister 1519 Peter Maister Elizabeth Thompson John Maister James Maister 1462 - 1508 Thomas Masters 46 46 1470 - 1517 Agnes 47 47 1488 Peter Maister 1492 Richard Maister 1494 William Maister 1496 Thomas Maister 1498 Alice Maister 1112 - 1192 William de Braose 80 80 William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber (d. ca. 1180) was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, Second Lord of Bramber. William married Bertha de Pitres, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford. Through this marriage, William acquired lordship of Brecon and Abergavenny in 1166 because Bertha's brothers all died young without heirs.

In 1174, William became sheriff of Hereford. He was succeeded as Lord of Bramber by his son, William.



Sources:

   1. Abbrev: Gedcom FileThorns among the roses, 14 March 2003,
      Title: Gedcom FileThorns among the roses, 14 March 2003, Holly Forrest Tamer bhtt141@netins.nethtt141@netins.nethtt141@netins.net.

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[de brus.ged]

* Sheriff of Hertfordshire
* Lord of Abergavenny and Brecknock
* Note: WILLIAM DE BRAOSE was Sheriff of Hertfordshire 1174-5; gave King Henry II 1,000 marks of silver for part of the honor of Barnstaple, his right from his grandfather Johel de Totenais, and 10 Henry II, 1164, was one of the subscribers to the Constitution of Clarendon; married Bertha, second daughter and eventually co-heiress of Milo de Gloucester (ped. 107), Lord of Brecknock

http://www.my-ged.com/db/page/draper/09470
William was very fortunate in his marriage to Berta. All of her brothers died young without heirs so she brought a number of important lordships to the de Braoses in 1166. These included Brecon and Abergavenny. William became Sheriff of Herefordshire in 1174. His interest in Sussex was maintained as he confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather for the maintenance of Sele Priory and extended St. Mary's, Shoreham. [Internet source: http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/William2.htm]
1130 - 1170 Bertha de Gloucester de Pitres 40 40 1146 - 1211 William de Braose 65 65 William de Braose, Fourth Lord of Bramber (1140/1150 - August 9, 1211) at his peak was also lord of Gower, Abergavenny, Brecknock, Builth, Radnor, Kington, Limerick, Skenfrith, Grosmont, and Whitecastle. His rise and fall at the hands of king John is often taken as an example of that king's arbitrary and capricious behavior towards his barons.

William was the son of William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber and Bertha of Hereford, daughter of Miles Fitz Walter, Earl of Hereford and his wife, formerly Sibyl de Neufmarche. From his father he inherited the Rape of Bramber, in Sussex, and through his mother he inherited a large estate in the Welsh Marches.

In 1175, William carried out the Massacre of Abergavenny, killing several Welsh princes to avenge the death of his uncle Henry, Earl of Hereford, after having invited them to a feast at Abergavenny Castle. This resulted in great hostility against him among the Welsh, who named him the "Ogre of Abergavenny".

In 1199, William fought beside King Richard the Lion-heart at Chalus, where Richard was killed.

He was greatly favored by King John early in his reign. John granted him all that he might conquer from the Welsh in Radnor, gave him lordship over Limerick in Ireland (save for the city itself), possession of Glamorgan castle, and then lordship over Gower.

In 1203, William was put in charge of Arthur of Brittany, whom he had personally captured the previous year. William was suspected of involvement in Arthur's disappearance, although no concrete evidence ever came to light. There is somewhat better evidence that he at least knew the truth of the matter.

In 1206 John gave William the three great castles of Gwent (Skenfrith, Grosmont, and Whitecastle). At this point only an earldom separated him from the greatest in England.

But soon after William fell out of favor with the king. The precise reasons remain obscure. John's stated reasons regard money de Braose owed the crown. But the king's actions went far beyond what would be necessary to recover the debt. Instead, he evidently wanted to break de Burgh, and to that end invaded Wales to seize the de Braose domains there. Beyond that, he sought de Braose's wife, who, the story goes, had made no secret of her belief that John had murdered Arthur of Brittany.

De Braose fled to Ireland, then returned to Wales as John hunted him in Ireland. In Wales, William allied himself to the Welsh prince Llewelyn and helped him in rebellion against King John.

In 1210, William fled in disguise to France and died the following year at Corbeil. William's wife, Maud de St. Valery, and eldest son, William, were captured and murdered by King John, possibly starved to death.

While William had aroused the jealousy of the other barons during his rise, the arbitrary and violent manner of his fall very likely discomfited them and played a role in the baronial uprisings of the next decade. The historian Sidney Painter, in his biography of King John, called it "the greatest mistake John made during his reign, as the king revealed to his barons once and for all his capacity for cruelty".

Eventually, William's third son, Reginald de Braose reacquired some of his father's titles and lands. The middle son, Giles, was Bishop of Hereford from 1200 until his death in 1215.

William also had a daughter, Margaret, who married Walter de Lacy, Lord of Meath.



Sources:

   1. Abbrev: Gedcom FileThorns among the roses, 14 March 2003,
      Title: Gedcom FileThorns among the roses, 14 March 2003, Holly Forrest Tamer bhtt141@netins.nethtt141@netins.nethtt141@netins.net.
1146 Matilda de Braose 1151 Bertha de Braose 1121 Elizabeth de Beaumont 1098 - 1153 Simon de St. Liz 55 55 1636 - 1706 Rachel Sargent 70 70 1149 - 1228 Sybil de Braose 79 79 # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 194-6
# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: XI:320-321
1425 - 1496 Matilda Throckmorton 71 71 1413 John Throckmorton Richard Throckmorton 1412 - 1472 Thomas Throckmorton 60 60 1412 Maud Throckmorton 1404 Eleanor Throckmorton 1445 - 1489 Marina Beler 44 44 1365 - 1440 Isabel Stretele 75 75 1345 - 1394 Thomas Giffard 49 49 1212 - 1278 Hamon Massey 66 66 1166 - 1250 Hamon Massey 84 84 Mainwaring 1129 - 1216 Hamon Massey 87 87 1140 - 1225 Agatha de Theray Kerton 85 85 Agnes de Massey 1100 Eleanor de Beaumont 1100 - 1140 Hamon Massey 40 40 1080 - 1140 Hamon Massey 60 60 1077 - 1103 Margaret Sacie 26 26 1042 - 1076 Guillaume Massey 34 34 1042 Muriel de Conteville 1380 - 1430 Alice Johanna de Besford 50 50 1297 John de Besford 1308 Joan de Harley 1342 John de Besford 1345 Margaret de Besford 1347 Joan de Besford 1349 Elizabeth de Besford 1260 Alexander de Besford 1276 Beatrice de Thornden 1301 Alexander de Besford 1303 Thomas de Besford 1299 Christian de Besford 1288 Nicholas de Thornden 1319 Beatrice de Thornden 1230 - 1268 Alexander de Besford 38 38 1234 - 1290 Margaret de Nauton 56 56 1210 - 1267 Walter de Besford 57 57 1214 Helen 1185 Vivian de Besford 1189 Elizabeth de Nafford 1160 Osbert de Besford 1135 Vivian de Besford 1140 Elizabeth ap Nyflyn 1159 - 1210 Walter de Nafford 51 51 1130 William de Nafford 1104 Ellis de Nafford 1209 Richard de Severn Stoke 1214 Avice de Nauton 1232 Robert de Nauton 1251 John de Thornden 1251 Beatrice de Parnell 1278 Sybil de Thornden 1288 Nicholas de Thornden 1293 John de Thornden 1226 Maurice de Thornden 1268 - 1341 Robert de Harley 73 73 1270 Margaret de Brampton 1298 Robert de Harley 1248 Richard de Harley 1245 Burgo de Willey 1210 Robert de Harley 1229 Alice de Pulesdon 1180 Nicholas de Harley 1190 Alice de Presthop 1215 Henry de Harley 1185 - 1230 Roger de Pulesdon 45 45 1198 Elizabeth de Dutton 1210 Roger de Pulesdon 1220 - 1265 Andreas de Willey 45 45 1225 Dorothy Hugford 1190 - 1255 Nicholas de Willey 65 65 1200 Burgo de Pichford 1160 William de Willey 1195 Warren de Willey 1195 Walter Hugford 1240 Brian de Brampton 1217 Emma Corbet 1210 - 1294 Brian de Brampton 84 84 1235 Walter de Brampton 1185 Brian de Brampton 1190 Alice Neufmenell 1160 John de Brampton 1162 - 1210 Maud de Braiose 48 48 1135 Brian de Brampton 1140 Matilda de Saint Valery 1100 Brian de Brampton 1110 Mathilde d'Evereaux 1070 Bernard de Brampton 1040 - 1095 Walcelin de Douai 55 55 1042 Emma 1065 Robert de Brampton 1068 Aylward de Brampton 1100 Hermer de Brampton 1150 Roger de Braiose 1152 Philip de Braiose 1154 Engeram de Braiose 1154 Isabel de Braiose 1156 Reginald de Braiose 1158 Gillian de Braiose 1160 John de Braiose 1165 Giles de Braiose 1162 Walter Neufmenell 1290 Peter de Thornton 1294 Lucia de Hellesby 1316 Eleanor de Thornton 1323 Margaret de Thornton 1325 Elizabeth de Thornton 1335 Matilda de Thornton 1254 Randolph de Thornton 1266 Katherine de St. Pierre 1302 Alice de Thornton 1215 Piers de Thornton 1180 Ciceley de Kingsley 1205 Margery de Thornton 1206 Randolph de Thornton 1213 Ciceley de Thornton 1162 - 1244 Randle de Thornton 82 82 This Randle de Torhaunt must have been Randle le Roter, Lord of Thornton, who became possessed of the Manor of Thornton and is stated by Collins to have been a son of David le Clerk, Secretary to Randle Blundeville, Earl of Chester. Randle assumed the name of le Roter, and also of Thornton from his place of residence, and is sometimes designated by both.
Randle Thornton died before the 28th of Henry III, having married Amicia, daughter of Richard Kingsley and his wife Joan, daughter and co-heiress of Alexander Sylvester, Lord of Stourton and Forester of Wirral.
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I had him as son of Peter de Thronton, so in the light of that and the above, have made him son of Peter, son of David le Clerc.
1240 - 1293 Uraine de St. Pierre 53 53 1243 - 1295 Idonea de Malpas 52 52 1268 Uraine de St. Pierre 1270 John de St. Pierre 1276 Joan de St. Pierre 1278 Margaret de St. Pierre 1211 - 1290 John de St. Pierre 79 79 1242 John de St. Pierre 1143 - 1214 John de Meschines 71 71 1181 William de St. Pierre 1268 William de Hellesby 1270 Alice Hawise Tursell 1296 Katherine de Hellesby 1299 William de Hellesby 1240 Alan de Hellesby 1258 Beatrice de Hatton 1270 Roger de Hellesby 1229 - 1260 Adam de Hatton 31 31 1236 Matilda de Bretargh 1200 William de Hatton 1210 Agnes de Dutton 1227 Simon de Hatton 1230 Emma de Hatton 1170 - 1259 Hugh de Hatton 89 89 1180 - 1257 Nichola Boydell 77 77 1202 Simon de Hatton 1142 Ralph de Hatton 1147 Nichola de Lindsay 1112 Roger de Hatton 1120 Elizabeth de Normanville 1078 Hugh de Hatton 1110 Hugh de Hatton 1115 Waithew de Hatton 1049 Walter de Hatton 1085 Ralph de Normanville 1120 Ralph de Normanville 1080 Margary de Hatton 1023 - 1059 Yvron Bellomontensis 36 36 1003 Geoffrey de Bretagne 1009 Hedwige de Normandy 1025 Emma de Bretagne 1044 Jean de Cotentin 1048 Marie de Falaise 1068 Guillaume de Cotentin 1054 Wolfaith de Hatton Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
Page: Adrian Channing, 25 May 1999
Text: Ivo's 6th son
1117 Simon de Lindsay 1096 William de Lindsay 1122 Walter de Lindsay 1070 Walter de Linesay 1045 - 1086 Baldric de Toeni 41 41 The Lindsays of Scotland are one of the most ancient and honorable houses of the scottish kingdom. They intermarried with the royal princesses and at one time were second only to the royal family. According to the historian of the Lindsay family the first of the name to appear in Scotland were tow brothers, Walter and William de Lindsay, Anglo-Normans, about 1116. They were the sons of Baron Baldric de Linesay, a Norman kinght related to and contemporary with William the Conqueror.

The de Linesays were of Norman extraction and the family was seated near Rouen for many centuries, and through their Norwegian ancestor, Malahulc, are remote descendants of the great house of De Toeny, the hereditary standardbearers of Normandy.

Arms--Quarterly first and fourth gu., a fesse chequy, argent and az., for Lindsay; and second and third, or, a lion rampant hr, debruised of a ribbon in bend sa. for Abernethy.

Crest: An ostrich proper holding in his mouth a key

Motto--Toujours loyal
1072 William de Lindsay 1020 Hugo de Toeni 1050 Randolph de Toeni 1048 Godehilde de Toeni 0992 Ralph Rodulf de Toeni 1015 Godehilde de Toeni 1150 - 1200 William Boydell 50 50 1120 Helton Boydell 1190 - 1248 Geoffrey de Dutton 58 58 1190 Agnes de Massey 1212 Margaret de Dutton 1217 - 1296 Geoffrey de Dutton 79 79 1154 Geoffrey de Dutton 1173 Joanna de Lacy 1128 Hugh de Dutton 1132 Alice Prescott 1104 Richard Prescott 1152 Hugh de Dutton 1156 - 1248 Adam de Dutton 92 92 Lord of Warburton
Adam de Dutton, Lord of Warburton, time of Henry II, Richard II and John, married Agnes, daughter and heiress of Roger Fitz-Alured, who in a charter now in possession of the Warburton family, gives "meditate Warburton with his daughter in marriage with Adam de Dutton. Adam survived as late as King John and in addition to the preceding grants he had divers others from King John, Roger de Lacy and others. The other moiety which appears from the charters to also have been vested in Roger Fitz-Alured, and also passed to Adam de Dutton, as it is stated to be part of his fee for his grant to Warburton priory. They had Geoffrey, John and Agatha.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 273)

Adam de Dutton, by his marriage with Agnes Fitzalured, (dau. and hair of Roger Fitzalured) became proprietor of the manor of Warburton, as Lord, in the time of Henry II. One half he gave to the canons of Warburton, for the soul of his son John, (who was buried there,) among other reasons. The other half he gave to the Knights Hospitallers, who re-granted the same In 1187. Adam had issue; 1) Geoffry, his eldest son and successor; 2) John, buried at Warbarton; 3) Agatha. The older son, Sir Geoffry Dutton, reslded principally
at Sutton. He obtained Aston, near Budworth, in which Arley lies. The name of the lady he marrled does not appear, but Lysons suggests that Alice, the dau. of John Lacy, constable of Chester, Baron of Halton, may have been his wife; which said Alice, many heralds have given as a wife to Adam, his father. This conjecture reoeives a strong confirmation from a family Deed, by which John Lacy gives the manor of Clifton, to Geoffry Dutton, with the expression, SCILICET DE UXORE DESPONSATA. Adam de Dutton, as well as his cousln, the Baron of Halton, had emulated each other in donations to religious establishments, and
in this generation the representatives of both familles, John de Lacy and Geoffry.
(Genealogy of the Dutton Family of Pennsylvania, page 13)
1096 - 1130 Hugh FitzOdard of Dutton 34 34 1106 Alice Pichard 1122 Geoffrey de Dutton 1124 Roger de Dutton 1126 Thomas de Dutton 1130 Adam de Dutton 1046 Odard of Dutton The First Duttons

[Dutton Coat of Arms] In the eleventh century, there were a number of people in Cheshire, England who could have called themselves De Dutton, the original family surname. That was because they all were de (from) Dutton which was originally known as Duntune, meaning town on a hill. However, it was Odard, who came to England in the train of William the Conqueror and was granted a third of the township in 10861, that first used it as his surname.

Odard probably wouldn't have been so fortunate if William the Counqueror hadn't been his great uncle and the Earl of Chester his uncle. It was the Earl, Hugh of Lupis that granted the land at Dutton to Odard. This is also why we know so much about Odard's ancestory. Both he and William were descended from Rollo, the first Duke of Normandy. Rollo, in turn, was descended from the King of Finland as described in Scandanavian sagas. The direct male Dutton line continued for some 600 years.

The Warburtons claim consanguinity with the ancient blood-royal of England, being descended from Rollo, the first Duke of Normandy, through William, Earl of Eu, who married a niece of William the Conqueror. Richard, Duke of Normandy, (grand-son of Rollo) sur-named sans-peur, had Issue (besides his son Richard who succeeded him, his daughter Emma, Queen of England, and other children) two younger sons, Godfrey and William. To Godfrey, his father gave the earldoms of Eu and Brion. On His decease the latter earldom became the heritage of his posterity, branching out into the now extinct houses of the Earls of Clare and Pembroke, while William, the younger brother, succeeded him in the earldom of Eu. He had (besides others) his successor, Robert, father of William, who married a sister of Hugh Lupus, Earl of Avranches, (afterwards Earl of Chester) named Jeanne, and niece of William the Conqueror. There was Issue of this marriage (besides William's successor in the earldom of Eu and another child) six sons, named Nigel, Geffry, Odard or Huddard, Edard, Horswin and Wlofaith. These six brothers accompanied their uncle, Hugh Lupus, into England, in the train of William the Conqueror, their great-uncle; and on the establishment of the Norman power had various estates and honors conferred upon them. Nigel was created Baron of Halton and constable of Cheshire; Geffry was Lord of Stopfort; Odard, Lord of Dutton; Edard, Lord of Haselwell; Horswin, Lord of Shrigley; and Wlofaith, Lord of Halton. Odard, the third son, was the ancestor of the Duttons, now extinct in the male line; the Barons of Chedill, also extinct, and the Warburtons.
--Burke's Landed Gentry, p. 1508.

Odard, son of Yvron, viscount of Constantine, (whose name is written in most records of later date, Hodard or Hudard) was the Immediate ancestor of the ancient and numerous family of Dutton of Dutton.--Lysons' Magna Britannia, Vol. II.[Richard de Lacy.ged]

The First Duttons

[Dutton Coat of Arms] In the eleventh century, there were a number of people in Cheshire, England who could have called themselves De Dutton, the original family surname. That was because they all were de (from) Dutton which was originally known as Duntune, meaning town on a hill. However, it was Odard, who came to England in the train of William the Conqueror and was granted a third of the township in 10861, that first used it as his surname.

Odard probably wouldn't have been so fortunate if William the Counqueror hadn't been his great uncle and the Earl of Chester his uncle. It was the Earl, Hugh of Lupis that granted the land at Dutton to Odard. This is also why we know so much about Odard's ancestory. Both he and William were descended from Rollo, the first Duke of Normandy. Rollo, in turn, was descended from the King of Finland as described in Scandanavian sagas. The direct male Dutton line continued for some 600 years.

The Warburtons claim consanguinity with the ancient blood-royal of England, being descended from Rollo, the first Duke of Normandy, through William, Earl of Eu, who married a niece of William the Conqueror. Richard, Duke of Normandy, (grand-son of Rollo) sur-named sans-peur, had Issue (besides his son Richard who succeeded him, his daughter Emma, Queen of England, and other children) two younger sons, Godfrey and William. To Godfrey, his father gave the earldoms of Eu and Brion. On His decease the latter earldom became the heritage of his posterity, branching out into the now extinct houses of the Earls of Clare and Pembroke, while William, the younger brother, succeeded him in the earldom of Eu. He had (besides others) his successor, Robert, father of William, who married a sister of Hugh Lupus, Earl of Avranches, (afterwards Earl of Chester) named Jeanne, and niece of William the Conqueror. There was Issue of this marriage (besides William's successor in the earldom of Eu and another child) six sons, named Nigel, Geffry, Odard or Huddard, Edard, Horswin and Wlofaith. These six brothers accompanied their uncle, Hugh Lupus, into England, in the train of William the Conqueror, their great-uncle; and on the establishment of the Norman power had various estates and honors conferred upon them. Nigel was created Baron of Halton and constable of Cheshire; Geffry was Lord of Stopfort; Odard, Lord of Dutton; Edard, Lord of Haselwell; Horswin, Lord of Shrigley; and Wlofaith, Lord of Halton. Odard, the third son, was the ancestor of the Duttons, now extinct in the male line; the Barons of Chedill, also extinct, and the Warburtons.
--Burke's Landed Gentry, p. 1508.

Odard, son of Yvron, viscount of Constantine, (whose name is written in most records of later date, Hodard or Hudard) was the Immediate ancestor of the ancient and numerous family of Dutton of Dutton.--Lysons' Magna Britannia, Vol. II.
1071 Alice de Dutton 1046 Odard of Dutton The First Duttons

[Dutton Coat of Arms] In the eleventh century, there were a number of people in Cheshire, England who could have called themselves De Dutton, the original family surname. That was because they all were de (from) Dutton which was originally known as Duntune, meaning town on a hill. However, it was Odard, who came to England in the train of William the Conqueror and was granted a third of the township in 10861, that first used it as his surname.

Odard probably wouldn't have been so fortunate if William the Counqueror hadn't been his great uncle and the Earl of Chester his uncle. It was the Earl, Hugh of Lupis that granted the land at Dutton to Odard. This is also why we know so much about Odard's ancestory. Both he and William were descended from Rollo, the first Duke of Normandy. Rollo, in turn, was descended from the King of Finland as described in Scandanavian sagas. The direct male Dutton line continued for some 600 years.

The Warburtons claim consanguinity with the ancient blood-royal of England, being descended from Rollo, the first Duke of Normandy, through William, Earl of Eu, who married a niece of William the Conqueror. Richard, Duke of Normandy, (grand-son of Rollo) sur-named sans-peur, had Issue (besides his son Richard who succeeded him, his daughter Emma, Queen of England, and other children) two younger sons, Godfrey and William. To Godfrey, his father gave the earldoms of Eu and Brion. On His decease the latter earldom became the heritage of his posterity, branching out into the now extinct houses of the Earls of Clare and Pembroke, while William, the younger brother, succeeded him in the earldom of Eu. He had (besides others) his successor, Robert, father of William, who married a sister of Hugh Lupus, Earl of Avranches, (afterwards Earl of Chester) named Jeanne, and niece of William the Conqueror. There was Issue of this marriage (besides William's successor in the earldom of Eu and another child) six sons, named Nigel, Geffry, Odard or Huddard, Edard, Horswin and Wlofaith. These six brothers accompanied their uncle, Hugh Lupus, into England, in the train of William the Conqueror, their great-uncle; and on the establishment of the Norman power had various estates and honors conferred upon them. Nigel was created Baron of Halton and constable of Cheshire; Geffry was Lord of Stopfort; Odard, Lord of Dutton; Edard, Lord of Haselwell; Horswin, Lord of Shrigley; and Wlofaith, Lord of Halton. Odard, the third son, was the ancestor of the Duttons, now extinct in the male line; the Barons of Chedill, also extinct, and the Warburtons.
--Burke's Landed Gentry, p. 1508.

Odard, son of Yvron, viscount of Constantine, (whose name is written in most records of later date, Hodard or Hudard) was the Immediate ancestor of the ancient and numerous family of Dutton of Dutton.--Lysons' Magna Britannia, Vol. II.[Richard de Lacy.ged]

The First Duttons

[Dutton Coat of Arms] In the eleventh century, there were a number of people in Cheshire, England who could have called themselves De Dutton, the original family surname. That was because they all were de (from) Dutton which was originally known as Duntune, meaning town on a hill. However, it was Odard, who came to England in the train of William the Conqueror and was granted a third of the township in 10861, that first used it as his surname.

Odard probably wouldn't have been so fortunate if William the Counqueror hadn't been his great uncle and the Earl of Chester his uncle. It was the Earl, Hugh of Lupis that granted the land at Dutton to Odard. This is also why we know so much about Odard's ancestory. Both he and William were descended from Rollo, the first Duke of Normandy. Rollo, in turn, was descended from the King of Finland as described in Scandanavian sagas. The direct male Dutton line continued for some 600 years.

The Warburtons claim consanguinity with the ancient blood-royal of England, being descended from Rollo, the first Duke of Normandy, through William, Earl of Eu, who married a niece of William the Conqueror. Richard, Duke of Normandy, (grand-son of Rollo) sur-named sans-peur, had Issue (besides his son Richard who succeeded him, his daughter Emma, Queen of England, and other children) two younger sons, Godfrey and William. To Godfrey, his father gave the earldoms of Eu and Brion. On His decease the latter earldom became the heritage of his posterity, branching out into the now extinct houses of the Earls of Clare and Pembroke, while William, the younger brother, succeeded him in the earldom of Eu. He had (besides others) his successor, Robert, father of William, who married a sister of Hugh Lupus, Earl of Avranches, (afterwards Earl of Chester) named Jeanne, and niece of William the Conqueror. There was Issue of this marriage (besides William's successor in the earldom of Eu and another child) six sons, named Nigel, Geffry, Odard or Huddard, Edard, Horswin and Wlofaith. These six brothers accompanied their uncle, Hugh Lupus, into England, in the train of William the Conqueror, their great-uncle; and on the establishment of the Norman power had various estates and honors conferred upon them. Nigel was created Baron of Halton and constable of Cheshire; Geffry was Lord of Stopfort; Odard, Lord of Dutton; Edard, Lord of Haselwell; Horswin, Lord of Shrigley; and Wlofaith, Lord of Halton. Odard, the third son, was the ancestor of the Duttons, now extinct in the male line; the Barons of Chedill, also extinct, and the Warburtons.
--Burke's Landed Gentry, p. 1508.

Odard, son of Yvron, viscount of Constantine, (whose name is written in most records of later date, Hodard or Hudard) was the Immediate ancestor of the ancient and numerous family of Dutton of Dutton.--Lysons' Magna Britannia, Vol. II.
1066 Nicholas Pichard 1206 Hugh of Bretargh 1215 - 1273 Eleanor Plantagenet 58 58 1208 - 1265 Simon de Montfort 57 57 MATTHEW of WESTMINSTER
Simon de Montfort's Rebellion, 1265

This account, ascribed to a monk Matthew, living in Westminster Abbey, describes the rebellion of Simon de Montfort and his short-lived success, during the reign of Henry III, in 1265. The chronicler is by no means sympathetic to the rebellion. The prominence of these events is because the parliament summoned by Simon was seen, with some exaggeration, by 19th century historians, as the first modern parliament. The chronicler is less impressed.

Simon de Montfort, the illustrious earl of Leicester , and the barons, having assembled their forces from all quarters, and collected troops, both of the Londoners, whose army had increased to fifteen thousand men, and of men from other parts in countless numbers, marched thither with great impetuosity and courage. Accordingly, they encamped at Flexinge, in Sussex, which is about six miles from Lewes, and three days before the battle, they addressed a message of the following tenor to their lord the king--

"To the most excellent lord Henry, by the grace Of God, king of England, &c. The barons and others, his faithful subjects, wishing to observe their oaths and the fidelity due to God and to him, wish health, and tender their lawful service with all respect and honor. As it is plain from much experience that those who are present with you have suggested to your highness many falsehoods respecting us, intending all the mischief that they can do, not only to you but also to us, and to your whole kingdom, we wish your excellency to know that we wish to preserve the safety and security of your person with all our might, as the fidelity which we owe to you demands, proposing to overthrow, to the utmost of our power, all those who are not our enemies but yours too, and the foes of the whole of your kingdom; and if any other statement is made to you respecting these matters, do not believe it; for we shall always be found your faithful subjects. And we, Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester, and Gilbert de Clare, at the request of the rest, have, for us and for them too who are here present, affixed our seals. Given at," etc.

But the king, despising this letter from his barons, was eager for war with all his heart, and sent them back the following letter of defiance:-

"Henry, by the grace of God, king of England, &c., to Simon de Montfort and Gilbert de Clare, and their partisans. Since, from the war and general confusion existing in our kingdom, which has all been caused by you, and by the conflagrations and other lawless mischiefs, it is distinctly visible that you do not preserve the fidelity which you owe to us, and that you have in no respect any regard for the safety of our person, since you have wickedly attacked our nobles and others our faithful subjects, who have constantly preserved their fidelity to us, and since you still design to injure them as far as in your power, as you have signified to us by your letters, we consider their grievances as our own, and look upon their enemies as ours; especially since those our faithful subjects before mentioned are manfully standing by us and maintaining their fidelity in opposition to your disloyal conduct, and we do not care for your safety or for your affection, but defy you, as the enemies of us and them. Witness my hand, at Lewes, on the twelfth day of May, in the forty-eighth year of our reign."

"Richard, by the grace of God, king of the Romans, always Augustus, and Edward, the illustrious eldest son of the king of England, and all the other barons and nobles who constantly with the labors of sincere good faith and devotedness have adhered to the aforesaid king of England, to Simon de Montfort, Gilbert de Clare, and each and all the others who are accomplices in their treason. By your letters which you have sent to the illustrious king of England, our dearest lord, we understand that we are defied by you, although a verbal defiance of this kind was long ago sufficiently proved to us by actual reality, through your hostile pursuit of us, your burning of our properties, and general devastation of our possessions; we, therefore, wish you to know that you are all defied by each and all of us, as public enemies, and that we are your enemies; and that we will labor with all our might to the damage of your persons and property, whenever any opportunity of injuring either is offered . to us. But as to what- you falsely charge us with, that we give neither faithful nor salutary counsel to the king your master, you do not at all say the truth; and if you, Simon de Montfort or Gilbert de Clare, choose to assert this same thing in the court of our lord the king, we are prepared to procure a safe conduct and to come to the said court, and to prove the truth of our innocence in this particular, and your falsehood as perfidious traitors, by another who is your equal in nobleness and blood. And we are all content with the seals of the lords above mentioned, namely, of the king of the Romans and the lord Edward. Given as above."

As, therefore, God did by no means admit of their coming to agreement, a most terrible battle took place between them, at Lewes, on the fourteenth of May, such as had never been heard of in past ages. The barons (among whom there was in all things and in every danger but one faith and one will, since they were so unanimous in their fraternal affection that they feared not even to die for their cause,) came the first thing in the morning in front of Lewes, and placed their tents and baggage on a hill, the chariot of the earl of Leicester, with his standard, being carefully placed below under the brow. And so the army and line of battle were arranged, and a speech of great persuasiveness was made to the soldiers by their general, Simon de Montfort, by which all were encouraged, and prepared to fight for their country with every feeling of security. Moreover, all of them having made a confession beforehand, crossed themselves on their shoulders and breasts. Therefore, the king and the other nobles, being informed of their sudden advance, wakened up all through the camp, and speedily assembled in arms, and marshaled their army for battle, arraying a vast multitude of men armed with breastplates; but the greater number of them being false and factious, and destitute of all proper principle, marched forward on that day without any order, and with precipitation, and fought unskillfully, and showed no steady perseverance. And in the actual battle the noblest of the knights and esquires, to the number of about three hundred, lost all courage, and turning their backs, fled to the castle of Peneneselli. Among them, were John, earl of Warrenne, William de Valence, Guy de Lizunac, both the two last being brothers of the king, Hugh Bigod, and many others. But the king's army, which was adorned with the royal standard, which they call the dragon, and which marshaled the way to a fierce contest to the death, advanced forward, and the battle began. For the royal troops rapidly opened their close battalions, and boldly urged their horses against the enemy, and attacked them on the flank. And thus the two armies encountered one another, with fierce blows and horrid noises. Therefore, in this way, the line of battle of the barons was pierced and broken; and John de Giffard, a gallant knight, who had been ambitious to gain the honor of striking the first blow, was taken prisoner, and led, away to the castle. But Edward got among the forces of the Londoners, and pursued them when flying, and letting the nobles escape, he followed them, as it is said, for a distance of about four miles, inflicting on them a most lamentable slaughter. For he thirsted for their blood as a punishment for the insult they had offered to his mother, for, as has been already recorded, they had heaped a great deal of abuse on his mother. But a part of the king's army, in the meantime, thirsting for the spoils, and booty, and plunder of the baggage which was on the hills, slew some of the citizens of London, who, for security's sake, had been introduced into the earl's chariot, hoping that they had found the earl himself there. But that earl, and Gilbert de Clare, and the other barons, acting with more sagacity, put forth all their strength to effect the capture of the king of England, and the king of Germany, and the rest of the chiefs. And there the fiery valor of the barons was visibly displayed, who fought eagerly for their country, and at last gained the victory. For the king of England was taken prisoner, after a very fine horse had been killed under him; and Richard, king of the Romans, was taken prisoner, and many others were taken also, namely, John de Balliol, Robert de Bruce, John Comyn, and other barons of Scotland , and nearly all the men-at-arms whom they had brought with them from Scotland were slain, to a very great number.

There was but little mention made for a year of the deliverance of Edward, the king's eldest son, until he himself, as the price of his release, gave his palatine county of Chester to the aforesaid earl of Leicester, and thus he purchased his liberation from the imprisonment and custody of the knights, his enemies. No one can adequately relate the condition of the nobles of the Marches, and the persecutions which they endured for a year and more. But when the earl of Leicester endeavored to banish these lords marchers into Ireland, they, entering the camp of the king's eldest son, on the extreme borders of Wales, plundered the Welsh castles of their enemies before mentioned, and thus furnished themselves with the necessary supplies, until the aforesaid earl of Leicester, having taken prisoner earl Ferrars, who secretly inclined to the party adverse to the capture of the earl of Gloucester, who has been often mentioned, and whom they suspected of similar sentiments, came having united with the to Gloucester. For then the lords marchers earl of Gloucester to meet their common danger, when the earl of Warrenne and William de Valence came with a large company of cross-bowmen and knights and landed in South Wales, they were inspired with greater boldness to resist the attacks of their persecutors; and to march to encounter the earl of Leicester and his friends, who were leading the king of England and his son to Hereford as prisoners; who marched on, being accompanied by his own army, and that of the prince of North Wales, while Simon, his second son, as the general and commander of the royal army, which had been levied throughout the kingdom, advanced from the other side, so that the two hemmed in the earls of Gloucester and Warrenne, and the lords marchers, and slew them all. But by the overruling providence of God, who is the doorkeeper of prisons, the release of the prisoners was effected, and on the Thursday in Whitsun week, the eldest son of the king went out into the fields about Hereford with his comrades and guards to take exercise, and then, when they had all mounted their destrier horses, and fatigued them with galloping, he, after that, mounted a horse of his own which was not tired, and requesting leave of his companions (though he did not obtain it), he went with all speed to the lord Roger de Mortimer, at Wigemor. And the next day, the earls of Gloucester and Warrenne, with their followers, met Edward at Ludlow, and forgetting all their mutual injuries and quarrels, and renewing their friendship, they proceeded with courage and alacrity to break down the bridges and sink the ferry-boats over the Severn. Afterwards, as their force was increased by the friends of the aforesaid Edward, whom the power of the adverse party had long compelled to lie hid, and when they had taken Gloucester, and treated the prisoners with most extravagant cruelty, the earl of Leicester and his army, being hemmed in the district about Hereford, were compelled to lead their nominal king about as a prisoner, and to subject him, against his will, to all the hardships of captivity.

And when Simon, the son of the aforesaid earl of Leicester, had, with many barons and knights, traversed and plundered all Kent, and the country about Winchester and the other southern districts of England, and then proceeded, to his own misfortune, with great speed to Kenilworth to meet his father, the aforesaid Edward and Gilbert and their armies, being, by the favor of God, forewarned of his approach, attacked his army at dawn on the day of Saint Peter ad Vincula, and took them all prisoners, except Simon and a few with him who escaped into the castle, and put them in chains, and stripped those robbers and plunderers of all their booty, and so celebrated a day of feasting at the New Chains.

The earl of Leicester and his companions, being ignorant of this event, and marching on with all speed, reached the river Severn that very same day, and having examined the proper fords, crossed the river at twilight with the design of meeting and finding the aforesaid Simon and his army, who were coming from England, and having stopped the two next days on the borders of Worcestershire, on the third day they entered the town of Evesham, and while they were occupying themselves there with refreshing their souls, which had been long fainting under hunger and thirst, with a little food, their scouts brought them word that the lord Edward and his army were not above two miles off. So the earl of Leicester and the barons marching out with their lord the king (whom they took with them by force) to the rising ground of a gentle hill, beheld Edward and his army on the top of a hill, not above a stone's throw from them, and hastening to them. And a wonderful conflict took place, there being slain on the part of the lord Edward only one knight of moderate prowess, and two esquires. On the other side there fell on the field of battle Simon, earl of Leicester, whose head, and hands, and feet were cut off, and Henry, his son, Hugh Despenser, justiciary of England, Peter de Montfort, William de Mandeville, Radulph Basset, Roger St. John, Walter de Despigny, William of York, and Robert Tregos, all very powerful knights and barons, and besides all the guards and warlike cavalry fell in the battle, with the exception of ten or twelve nobles, who were taken prisoners. And the names of the nobles who were wounded and taken prisoners were as follows: Guy de Montfort, son of the earl of Leicester John Fitz-John, Henry de Hastings, Humphrey de Peter de Montfort the younger, Bohun the younger, John de Vescy, and Nicholas de Segrave. . . .

Therefore, the battle of Evesham having been thus gallantly fought, the king and the nobles of the kingdom assembled at Winchester, and ordered that the richer citizens of the city of London should be thrust into prison, that the citizens should be deprived of their ancient liberties, and that the palisades and chains with which the city-was fortified should be removed, because the citizens had boldly adhered to Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester, in contempt of the king and also to the injury of the kingdom; all which was done, for the more powerful citizens were thrown into prison at the castle of Windsor, and were afterwards punished with a pecuniary fine of no inconsiderable amount. All liberty was forbidden to the citizens, and the Tower of London was made stronger by the palisades and chains which had belonged to the city.

After this, a sentence of confiscation was pronounced at Westminster, on the feast of the translation of the blessed Edward, against the king's enemies, whose lands the king bestowed without delay on his own faithful followers. But some of those against whom this sentence was pronounced redeemed their possessions by payment of a sum of money, others uniting in a body lay hid in the Woods, living miserably on plunder and rapine; the most powerful and mischievous of whom was Robert, earl Ferrars, who was restored to the full possession of his property, on condition that his loyalty to the king, he should lose his if ever he departed from earldom. . .
1252 - 1282 Eleanor de Montfort 29 29 1237 Henry de Montfort 1238 Simon de Montfort 1240 Guy de Montfort 1242 Amaury de Montfort 1245 Joanna de Montfort 1254 Isabel de Montfort 1150 - 1218 Simon de Montfort (L'Amaury) 68 68 1160 Alice de Montmorency 1184 Amaury de Montfort 1213 Amicie de Montfort 1129 - 1189 Bouchard de Montmorency 60 60 1137 - 1181 Laurette de Hainault 44 44 1162 Amicie de Montmorency 1165 Bouchard de Montmorency 1174 Mathieu de Montmorency 1090 - 1160 Mathieu de Montmorency 70 70 1099 Alice Aline 1069 - 1135 Henry England 66 66 Henry I (of England) (1068-1135), third Norman king of England (1100-1135), fourth son of William the Conqueror. Henry was born in Selby. Because his father, who died in 1087, left him no land, Henry made several unsuccessful attempts to gain territories on the Continent. On the death of his brother William II in 1100, Henry took advantage of the absence of another brother—Robert, who had a prior claim to the throne—to seize the royal treasury and have himself crowned king at Westminster. Henry subsequently secured his position with the nobles and with the church by issuing a charter of liberties that acknowledged the feudal rights of the nobles and the rights of the church. In 1101 Robert, who was duke of Normandy, invaded England, but Henry persuaded him to withdraw by promising him a pension and military aid on the Continent. In 1102 Henry put down a revolt of nobles, who subsequently took refuge in Normandy (Normandie), where they were aided by Robert. By defeating Robert at Tinchebray, France, in 1106, Henry won Normandy. During the rest of his reign, however, he constantly had to put down uprisings that threatened his rule in Normandy. The conflict between Henry and Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, over the question of lay investiture (the appointment of church officials by the king), was settled in 1107 by a compromise that left the king with substantial control in the matter.

Because he had no surviving male heir, Henry was forced to designate his daughter Matilda as his heiress. After his death on December 1, 1135, at Lyons-la-Fôret, Normandy, however, Henry's nephew, Stephen of Blois, usurped the throne, plunging the country into a protracted civil war that ended only with the accession of Matilda's son, Henry II, in 1154.

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Henry I (c.1068 - December 1, 1135), called Henry Beauclerk or Henry Beauclerc because of his scholarly interests, was the youngest son of William the Conqueror. He reigned as King of England from 1100 to 1135, succeeding his brother, William II Rufus. He was also known by the nickname "Lion of Justice". His reign is noted for his limitations on the power of the crown, his improvements in the machinery of government, his reuniting of the dominions of his father, and his controversial decision to name his daughter as his heir.

Henry was born between May 1068 and May 1069, probably in Selby, Yorkshire in England. As the youngest son of the family, he was most likely expected to become a bishop and was given extensive schooling for a young nobleman of that time period. He was probably the first Norman ruler to be fluent in English.

His father William, upon his death in 1087, bequeathed his dominions to his sons in the following manner:

Robert received the Duchy of Normandy
William received the Kingdom of England
Henry received 5000 pounds of silver
It is reported that he prophesied that Henry would eventually get everything his father had (Cross, 1917).

The two older brothers made an agreement that if either died without an heir, the two dominions of their father would be reunited under the surviving brother. When William II died in 1100, however, Robert was returning from the First Crusade. His absence, along with his poor reputation among the Norman nobles, allowed Henry to seize the keys of the royal hoard at Winchester. He was accepted as king by the leading barons and was crowned three days later on August 5 at Westminster. He immediately secured his position among the nobles by issuing the Charter of Liberties, which is considered a forerunner of the Magna Carta.

On November 11, 1100 Henry married Edith, daughter of King Malcolm III of Scotland. Since Edith was also the niece of Edgar Atheling, the marriage united the Norman line with old English line of kings. The marriage greatly displeased the Norman barons, however, and as a concession to their sensibilities, Edith changed her named to Matilda upon becoming queen.

The following year in 1101, Robert Curthose attempted to seize back the crown by an invading England. In the Treaty of Alton, Robert agreed to recognize Henry as king of England and return peacefully to Normandy, upon receipt of an annual sum of 2000 marks, which Henry proceeded to pay.

In 1105, to eliminate the continuing threat from Robert, Henry led an expeditionary force across the English Channel. In 1106, he decisively defeated his brother's Norman army at Tinchebray. He imprisoned his brother and appropriated the Duchy of Normandy as a possession of England, thus reuniting his father's dominions.

As king, Henry carried out social and judicial reforms, including:

issuing the Charter of Liberties
restoring laws of King Edward the Confessor.
He had two children by Matilda before her death in 1118: Maud, born February 1102, and William Adelin, born November 1103. On January 29, 1121, he married Adeliza, daughter of Godfrey, Count of Louvain, but there were no children from this marriage. He also holds the record for the largest number of acknowledged illegitimate children born to any English king, with a provisional total of twenty-five. One of his illegitimate daughters, Sybilla, married King Alexander I of Scotland.

However, his only legitimate son William Adelin perished in the wreck of the White Ship, on November 25, 1120, off the coast of Normandy. Also among the dead were Henry's illegitimate son Richard and illegitimate daughter Matilda, Countess of Perche, as well as a niece, Lucia de Blois.



Left without male heirs, Henry took the unprecedented step of making his barons swear to accept his daughter Matilda, widow of Henry V, the Holy Roman Emperor, as his heir.

Henry died of food poisoning from eating foul lampreys in December, 1135, at St. Denis le Fermont in Normandy and was buried at Reading Abbey.



Although Henry's barons had sworn allegiance to his daughter Matilda as their queen, Matilda's sex and her remarriage to the House of Anjou, an enemy of the Normans, allowed Henry's nephew Stephen of Boulogne to come to England and claim the throne with popular support.

The struggle between Matilda and Stephen resulted in a long civil war known as the Anarchy. The dispute was eventually settled by Stephen's naming of Matilda's son, Henry, as his heir in 1153.

---

# Note:

    Henry I was born in the year 1068---a factor he himself regarded as highly significant, for he was the only son of the Conqueror born after the conquest of England, and to Henry this meant he was heir to the throne. He was not an attractive proposition: he was dissolute to a degree, producing at least a score of bastards; but far worse he was prone to sadistic cruelty---on one occasion, for example, personally punishing a rebellious burgher by throwing him from the walls of his town.

# Note:

    At the death of William the Conqueror, Henry was left no lands, merely 5,000 pounds of silver. With these he bought lands from his elder brother Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy, only to see them taken back again a few years later by Robert, in unholy alliance with his brother William Rufus.

# Note:

    Henry could do little to avenge such treatment, but in England he found numerous barons who were tired of the exactions and ambitions of their king. He formed alliances with some of these, notably with the important de Clare family. He and some of the de Clares were with William Rufus on his last hunting expedition, and it is thought that the king's death was the result of Henry's plotting.

# Note:

    Certainly he moved fast to take advantage of it; leaving Rufus's body unattended in the woods, he swooped down on Winchester to take control of the treasury. Two days later he was in Westminster, being crowned by the Bishop of London. His speed is understandable when one realises that his elder brother, Robert [Curthose], was returning from the crusade, and claimed, with good reason, to be the true heir.

# Note:

    Henry showed great good sense in his first actions as King. He arrested Ranulph Flambard, William's tax-gatherer, and recalled Anselm, the exiled Archbishop. Furthermore, he issued a Charter of Liberties which promised speedy redress of grievances, and a return to the good government of the Conqueror. Putting aside for the moment his many mistresses, he married the sister of the King of Scots, who was descended from the royal line of Wessex; and lest the Norman barons should think him too pro-English in this action, he changed her name from Edith to Matilda. No one could claim that he did not aim to please.

# Note:

In 1101 Robert Curthose invaded, but Henry met him at Alton, and persuaded him to go away again by promising him an annuity of £2,000. He had no intention of keeping up the payments, but the problem was temporarily solved.

# Note:

    He now felt strong enough to move against dissident barons who might give trouble in the future. Chief amongst these was the vicious Robert of Bellême, Earl of Shrewsbury, whom Henry had known for many years as a dangerous troublemaker. He set up a number of charges against him in the king's court, making it plain that if he appeared for trial he would be convicted and imprisoned. Thus Robert and his colleagues were forced into rebellion at a time not of their own choosing, were easily defeated and sent scuttling back to Normandy.

# Note:

    In Normandy Robert Curthose began to wreak his wrath on all connected with his brother, thus giving Henry an excellent chance to retaliate with charges of misgovernment and invade. He made two expeditions in 1104-5, before the great expedition of 1106 on which Robert was defeated at the hour-long battle of Tinchebrai, on the anniversary of Hastings. No one had expected such an easy victory, but Henry took advantage of the state of shock resulting from the battle to annex Normandy. Robert was imprisoned (in some comfort, it be said); he lived on for 28 more years, ending up in Cardiff castle whiling away the long hours learning Welsh. His son William Clito remained a free agent, to plague Henry for most of the rest of his reign.

# Note:

    In England the struggle with Anselm over the homage of bishops ran its course until the settlement of 1107. In matters of secular government life was more simple: Henry had found a brilliant administrator, Roger of Salisbury, to act as Justiciar for him. Roger had an inventive mind, a keen grasp of affairs, and the ability to single out young men of promise. He quickly built up a highly efficient team of administrators, and established new routines and forms of organisation within which they could work. To him we owe the Exchequer and its recording system of the Pipe Rolls, the circuits of royal justiciars spreading the king's peace, and the attempts at codification of law. Henry's good relationships with his barons, and with the burgeoning new towns owed much to skilful administration. Certainly he was able to gain a larger and more reliable revenue this way than by the crude extortion his brother had used.

# Note:

    In 1120 came the tragedy of the White Ship. The court was returning to England, and the finest ship in the land was filled with its young men, including Henry's son and heir William. Riotously drunk, they tried to go faster and faster, when suddenly the ship foundered. All hands except a butcher of Rouen were lost, and England was without an heir.

# Note:

    Henry's only legitimate child was Matilda, but she was married to the Emperor Henry V of Germany, and so could not succeed. But in 1125 her husband died, and Henry brought her home and forced the barons to swear fealty to her---though they did not like the prospect of a woman ruler. Henry then married her to Geoffrey of Anjou, the Normans' traditional enemy, and the barons were less happy---especially when the newly-weds had a terrible row, and Geoffrey ordered her out of his lands. In 1131 Henry, absolutely determined, forced the barons to swear fealty once more, and the fact that they did so is testimoney of his controlling power. Matilda and Geoffrey were reunited, and in 1133 she produced a son whom she named for his grandfather. If only Henry could live on until his grandson was old enough to rule, all would be well.

# Note:

    But in 1135, against doctor's orders, he ate a hearty meal of lampreys, got acute indigestion, which turned into fever, and died. He was buried at his abbey in Reading---some said in a silver coffin, for which there was an unsuccessful search at the Dissolution. [Source: Who's Who in the Middle Ages, John Fines, Barnes & Noble Books, New York, 1995]

# Note:

Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 161-9

Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on
Page: Henry I

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 262-27, 33a-23
1069 Adeliza de Louvaine 1410 Jane Throckmorton 1418 Mary Throckmorton 1425 Margaret Throckmorton 1427 Elizabeth Throckmorton 1295 Matilda de Birmingham 1259 - 1335 William de Birmingham 76 76 1266 Maud 1288 William de Birmingham 1302 Walter de Birmingham 1225 - 1265 William de Birmingham 40 40 1237 Isabel de Astley 1262 Alicia de Birmingham 1190 Robert de Birmingham 1215 - 1265 Thomas de Astley 50 50 Sir Thomas De Astley, Knt. was a faithful subject of King Henry III. and held many appointments from 1241 to 1250. In 1262 he was a leader of the rebellious barons and in 1264 he was slain in the battle of Evesham between the king and barons. His first wife was Joane, dau. of Ernald de Bois
1219 Joan de Bois 1246 Andrew de Astley 1250 Richard de Astley 1256 Ralph de Astley 1184 - 1240 Walter de Astley 56 56 1188 Isabel 1217 Philip de Astley 1157 Maud de Camville 1153 - 1218 Thomas de Astley 65 65 Thomas De Astley in 1210 paid a hundred marks to the crown to be excused from going beyond the sea. Afterward he took up arms against King John, was taken prisoner and his estates confiscated. Later his estates were restored by Henry III. He married Maud, sister of Roger de Camvill.

THOMAS DE ASTLEY
Of Astley, son of Philip, held certain lands of t
"Honour of Leicester" and became a kind of baili
Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester.
In 1210 this Thomas paid a hundred marks to the
crown, "to be excused from going beyond the sea," .
it is supposed in a military expedition into Irelan
few years later he took up arms against the kin
1215 he was made a prisoner in Bedford Castle and h
estates were confiscated by the crown. When Henry I
came to the throne his territorial possessions were restor
to him in 1216, and he returned to his allegian
to the king.
1122 - 1189 Philip de Astley 67 67 Philip De Estley was a feudal baron in the reign of Henry II.

PHILIP DE ASTLEY
Grandson of the first possessor, was, upon the assessment of the aid towards the marriage of the daughter of Henry II, certified to hold three knights' fees of William, Earl of Warwick, "by the service of laying hands on the earl's stirrop when he did get upon or alight from horseback.
1093 Thomas de Astley 1066 Philip de Estleigh 1190 - 1255 Ernald de Bois 65 65 1192 Joan de Beauchamp 1221 - 1227 Ernald de Bois 6 6 1159 - 1206 Ernald de Bois 47 47 1161 - 1194 Emma de Hedenton 33 33 1129 Ernald de Bois 1131 Emma le Chamberlayne 1105 Paganus le Chamberlayne 1103 Robert de Bois 1070 Richard de Bois 1075 Adria 1110 John de Bois 1040 Jean de Boissay 1000 Guillaume de Boissay 1030 - 1080 Eve de Boissay 50 50 1160 - 1214 Andrew de Beauchamp 54 54 1164 - 1242 Eva de Grey 78 78 1195 Maud de Beauchamp 1555 Elizabeth Sargent 1558 Nicholas Sargent 1565 Mary Sargent 1566 John Sargent 1567 Jane Sargent 1569 Alice Sargent 1570 Richard Sargent 1571 Thomas Sargent 1573 George Sargent 1574 Magdaline Sargent 1576 Michael Sargent 1579 Dorothy Sargent 1504 - 1526 Roger Sargent 22 22 # Note: Roger Sargent is the 13th great-grandfather of Darrell V. Mansur and his wife Joan Ledbette r Mansur. 1

---

# Sources:

   1. Repository:

      Title: OneWorldTree
      Note:
      NS1024453

      Source Media Type: Ancestry.com

      NS069773

      NS076383
      Text: Ancestry.com. One World Tree (sm) [database online]. Provo, UT: MyFamily.com, Inc.

    
1255 William de Spineto 1260 Margery Durvassel 1272 John de la Spine 1276 Henry de la Spine 1278 Agnes de la Spine 1212 William de Spineto 1214 Joan de Cocton 1246 Roger de Spineto 1248 Walter de Spineto 1251 Henry de Spineto 1252 Joan de Spineto 1254 Alice de Spineto 1180 Randolph de Cocton Sources:
Abbrev: 2944943.ged
Title: 2944943.ged
Note:
Call number:
Text: Date of Import: Oct 2, 2004
Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 15 Jan 2005
Title: GEDCOM file submitted by Londa Andrews, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.m/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.
1195 Christian 1188 Roger de Spineto Sources:
Abbrev: 2944943.ged
Title: 2944943.ged
Note:
Call number:
Text: Date of Import: Oct 2, 2004
Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 15 Jan 2005
Title: GEDCOM file submitted by Londa Andrews, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.m/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.
1156 William de Spineto Sources:
Abbrev: 2944943.ged
Title: 2944943.ged
Note:
Call number:
Text: Date of Import: Oct 2, 2004
Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 15 Jan 2005
Title: GEDCOM file submitted by Londa Andrews, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.m/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.
1162 Joan de Kingwarton 1135 - 1184 Ralph de Kingwarton 49 49 1139 Christian 1157 Robert de Kingwarton 1161 Alexander de Kingwarton 1163 Simon de Kingwarton 1165 Philip de Kingwarton 1167 Maurice de Kingwarton Sources:
Abbrev: 2944943.ged
Title: 2944943.ged
Note:
Call number:
Text: Date of Import: Oct 2, 2004
Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 15 Jan 2005
Title: GEDCOM file submitted by Londa Andrews, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.m/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.
1107 - 1149 William de Cocton 42 42 1137 Simon de Wrottesley 1082 William de Cocton 1109 Robert de Cocton 1048 Randolph de Cocton Sources:
Abbrev: 2944943.ged
Title: 2944943.ged
Note:
Call number:
Text: Date of Import: Oct 2, 2004
Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 15 Jan 2005
Title: GEDCOM file submitted by Londa Andrews, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.m/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.
1023 William de Cocton Sources:
Abbrev: 2944943.ged
Title: 2944943.ged
Note:
Call number:
Text: Date of Import: Oct 2, 2004
Abbrev: GEDCOM file imported on 15 Jan 2005
Title: GEDCOM file submitted by Londa Andrews, http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.m/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2448544&id=I520357426. Created on 12 Aug 2004. Imported on 15 Jan 2005.
1043 - 1092 Neel Cotentin 49 49 1127 John de Massey 1131 Robert de Massey 1465 - 1504 Maxwell Sargent 39 39 Patricia Ann Hetherington 1319 Thomas Missenden 1330 - 1391 Isabella Brocas 61 61 D. 1394 Edmund Missenden 1293 - 1365 John Brocas 72 72 1300 Margaret 1327 Bernard Brocas 1266 - 1314 Arnald Brocas 48 48 1236 Bernard Brocas 1200 Bernard Brocas 1070 Brocas 1039 Sire de Brocas 1012 - 1038 Pierre Bernard de Foix 26 26 Letgarde Roger de Foix CHAN7 Oct 2004 1235 John de Hastings 1269 - 1330 Elias de Vaux 61 61 1274 Elizabeth de Hastings 1244 - 1305 Robert de Vaux 61 61 1258 Alice Saint Liz 1232 Adam Saint Liz 1236 Iseud Beckingham ~1184 - 1250 Simon de Saint Liz 66 66 ~1190 Anne Balistarius ~1165 Simon de Saint Liz ~1167 Amicia de Huntingdon 1146 - 1185 Alice de Gaunt 39 39 1140 - 1184 Simon de Saint Liz 44 44 1126 - 1156 Gilbert de Gaunt 30 30 1124 Rohese de Clare 1276 William Thirning 1250 William Thirning 1350 - 1374 Alice Thirkell 24 24 1295 - 1315 Robert de Wyleby 20 20 1298 - 1388 Emma 90 90 1257 - 1327 John de Wyleby 70 70 1231 - 1327 William de Wyleby 96 96 1225 Margery de Wyleby D. 1336 Nigel de Salford Sources:

   1. Abbrev: Blackmans of Knight's Creek
      Title: Blackmans of Knight's Creek
      Author: Henry James Young
      Publication: Carlisle, PA, 1980 
Margery D. 1313 John de Salford Sources:

   1. Abbrev: Blackmans of Knight's Creek
      Title: Blackmans of Knight's Creek
      Author: Henry James Young
      Publication: Carlisle, PA, 1980 
D. 1317 Joan D. 1240 Nigel de Salford Sources:

   1. Abbrev: Blackmans of Knight's Creek
      Title: Blackmans of Knight's Creek
      Author: Henry James Young
      Publication: Carlisle, PA, 1980 
D. 1232 Hugh Sources:

   1. Abbrev: Blackmans of Knight's Creek
      Title: Blackmans of Knight's Creek
      Author: Henry James Young
      Publication: Carlisle, PA, 1980 
D. 1213 Lucy 1340 William Winslowe 1342 Richard Winslowe 1274 Wyncelowe 1270 John Greig 1292 Richard Poure 1266 William Poure 1240 Richard Poure 1214 John Poure 1187 Hugh Poure 1160 Walter Poure 1314 Geoffrey Coleman 1309 Giles de Throckmorton 1314 Agnes Franceys John Franceys