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Family Subtree Diagram : ...Gwenllian verch Madog (1131)

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(three children) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (42 children) (a child) (four children) (two children) (three children) (a child) (ten children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) 0800 Kraka 1055 - 1137 Gruffydd ap Cynan 82 82 1080 Pewyr verch Bran 1080 Margred verch Gruffydd 1083 Rhanullt verch Gruffydd 1085 Gwenllian verch Gruffydd 1089 Elen verch Gruffydd 1091 Merinedd verch Gruffydd 1095 Susanna verch Gruffydd 1096 - 1171 Cadwaladr ap Gruffydd 75 75 1097 - 1137 Cadwallon ap Gruffydd 40 40 1004 Cynan ap Iago 1031 Rhanullt O'Olaf 1000 - 1034 Olaf Sitricsson 34 34 0974 - 1039 Iago ap Idwal 65 65 0984 Afandreg verch Gwair 0945 - 0996 Idwal ap Meurig 51 51 Sources:

   1. Repository:

      Title: Dictionary of National Biography
      Author: Ed by Sir Leslie S
      Publication: George Smith, Oxford Press, Vols 1-21 (Orignially published 1885-90)
      Page: X:412
   2. Title: Dictionary of Welsh Biography down to 1940
      Author: John Edward Lloyd & R T Jenkins
      Publication: 1957
      Page: 408
   3. Title: Annales Cambriae
   4. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 41
   5. Title: Y Bywgraffiadur Cymraig Hyd 1940
      Publication: Anrhydeddus Gymdeithas y Cymmrodorion
   6. Title: A Biographical Dictionary of Eminent Welshmen
      Author: Robert Williams M.A.
      Publication: Llandovery: William Rees, MDCCCLII 
0917 - 0986 Meurig ap Idwal 69 69 0883 - 0942 Idwal Foel ap Anarawrd 59 59 0887 Mereddon verch Cadwr 0857 - 0916 Anarawd ap Rhodri 59 59 Anarawd's father Rhodri the Great had eventually become ruler of most of Wales, but on his death in 878 his kingdom was shared out between his sons, with Anarawd inheriting the throne of Gwynedd. Anarawd and his brothers Cadell and Merfyn are recorded as cooperating closely against the rulers of the remaining lesser kingdoms of Wales. Earl Aethelred of Mercia invaded Gwynedd in 881, but Anarawd was able to defeat him with much slaughter in a battle at the mouth of the River Conwy, hailed in the annals as "God's vengeance for Rhodri", Rhodri having been killed in battle against the Mercians.

Anarawd now made an alliance with the Danish king of York in an attempt to guard himself against further Mercian attacks. When this alliance proved unsatisfactory, he came to an agreement with Alfred the Great of Wessex, visiting Alfred at his court. In exchange for Alfred's protection Anarawd recognised the supremacy of Alfred. This was the first time a ruler of Gwynedd had accepted the supremacy of an English king, and formed the basis for the homage which was demanded by the English crown from then on.

In 894 Anarawd was able to repel a raid by a Danish host on North Wales, and the following year raided Ceredigion and Ystrad Tywi in southern Wales. He is reported as having some English troops under his command for these raids. In 902 an attack on Anglesey by some of the Danes of Dublin under Ingimund was repulsed. Anarawd died in 916 and was succeeded by his son Idwal Foel (=Idwal the Bald).
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
0820 - 0878 Rhodri ap Merfyn 58 58 Rhodri the Great (in Welsh, Rhodri Mawr; occasionally in English, Roderick the Great) (c. 820–878) was the first ruler of Wales to be called 'Great', and the first to rule most of present-day Wales. He was called King of the Britons by the Annals of Ulster.

The son of Merfyn Frych ap Gwriad king of Gwynedd and Nest ferch Cadell of the royal line of Powys, he inherited the kingdom of Gwynedd on his father's death in 844. When his uncle Cyngen ap Cadell ruler of Powys died on a pilgrimage to Rome in 855 Rhodri inherited Powys. In 872 Gwgon, ruler of Seisyllwg in southern Wales, was accidentally drowned, and Rhodri added his kingdom to his domains by virtue of his marriage to Angharad, Gwgon's sister. This made him the ruler of the larger part of Wales.

Rhodri faced pressure both from the English and increasingly from the Danes, who were recorded as ravaging Anglesey in 854. In 856 Rhodri won a notable victory over the Danes, killing their leader Gorm (sometimes given as Horm). Two poems by Sedulius Scotus written at the court of Charles the Bald, king of the Western Franks, celebrate the victory of "Roricus" over the Norsemen.

In 877 Rhodri fought another battle against the Norse invaders on Anglesey, this time being forced to flee to Ireland. On his return the following year, he and his son Gwriad were said to have been killed by the English under Alfred the Great, though the precise manner of his death is unknown. When his son, Anarawd ap Rhodri won a victory over the Mercians a few years later, it was hailed in the annals as "God's vengeance for Rhodri".

His son Cadell ap Rhodri conquered Dyfed, which was later joined with Seisyllwg by Rhodri's grandson Hywel Dda to become Deheubarth. Like his grandfather, Hywel would come to rule to bulk of Wales.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

RODERIC MAWR, or the Great, who succeeded as King of Wales 843 and was slain at Anglesea in a battle against the English 876; married Anghared, daughter and heiress of Merich Dyfnwal ap Arthen ap Silsylht, King of Cardigan, and sister and heir of Gwygan ap Merick, Lord of Cardigan.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 181)
0825 Angharad verch Meurig 0764 - 0844 Merfyn Frych ap Gwriad 80 80 Merfyn Frych (=Merfyn the Freckled) seized control of Gwynedd in 825 on the death of Hywel Farf-fehinog ap Caradog, though he may have held power in Anglesey since 818. According to bardic tradition, Merfyn came "from the land of Manaw", but it is uncertain whether this refers to the Isle of Man ("Ynys Manaw" in Welsh) or to Manaw Gododdin, the area around the Firth of Forth. He may have had a claim to the throne of Gwynedd through his mother Esyllt, daughter of Cynan ap Rhodri Molwynog.
Merfyn allied himself to the royal house of Powys by marrying Nest, daughter of Cadell ap Brochwel and sister of Cyngen king of Powys. Despite Danish raids, Merfyn was able to maintain his position and on his death in 844 to hand the kingdom over intact to his son Rhodri the Great.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
0770 Esyllt verch Cynan EISYLHT who married Merfy Frych, King of Man, who became King of Wales in right of his wife 818 and was slain in battle 843 against the King of Mercia.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 181)
0745 - 0817 Cynan ap Rhodri 72 72 Cynan Dindaethwy ap Rhodri - Cynan Dindaethwy - was King of Gwynedd (798–816) in medieval north-west Wales.

Cynan was son of Rhodri Molwynog ap Idwal and Margaret ferch Duplory and ascended to the throne of Gwynedd after first his father died and then his cousin Caradog ap Meirion, who had become king after Rhodri, died in 798.

Cynan Dindaethwy ap Rhodri was preceeded by Caradog ap Meirion (c.754-c.798) and was succeeded by Hywel Farf-Fehinog ab Caradog (Howell Greasy-Beard) (814-825).
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

CONAN TINDAYTHWY, who became King of Wales 755 and died 818.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 181)
0690 - 0754 Rhodri ap Idwal 64 64 Rhodri ap Idwal (c.690-c.754; reigned from c.720) (Latin: Rodericus; English: Roderick), also known as Rhodri Molwynog ('the Bald and Gray'), was a king of Gwynedd.

The son of Idwal Iwrch and his wife, Princess Angrahad of Brittany, comparatively little is known of Rhodri's life or accomplishments. There is even some debate as to when he actually assumed the throne of Gwynedd, with the years 712, 720, 722 or 730 being the most probable candidates. Legend suggests that Rhodri successfully invaded and occupied Dumnonia for a time, before being expelled by the Saxons. This story may indeed be apocryphal, and others have suggested that Rhodri instead focused on strengthening the island of Anglesey, which, by this time, had become the stronghold of the kingdom. This argument is based on the understanding that Æthelbald, king of Mercia and self-styled Bretwalda, was continuing to press the kingdoms of Wales, and that Rhodri would have been far more likely to have been forced to adopt a defensive, rather than offensive, policy in dealing with incursions from Mercia and other Anglo-Saxon principalities.

Rhodri married Margaret ferch Duplory, an Irish princess, who bore him a son by the name of Cynan Dindaethwy. Because of the limited reliable information surrounding this period in Welsh history, it is not entirely clear who succeeded Rhodri upon his death, although the most likely candidate seems to be Caradog ap Meirion, a distant cousin, and not his son, who would ascend to the throne only after the death of Caradog.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
0650 - 0712 Idwal ap Cadwaladr 62 62 0660 Afadda verch Alain 0633 - 0682 Cadwaladr ap Cadwallon 49 49 Cadwaladr ap Cadwallon (c. 633–682, reigned from c. 655) (Latin: Catuvelladurus; English: Cadwallader), also known as Cadwaladr Fendigaid ('the Blessed') was a king of Gwynedd. Welsh chroniclers consider him to be one the greatest British kings to have ever lived, Geoffrey of Monmouth included him in his Historia Regum Britanniae (vii,3) as the last in the line of legendary Kings of the Britons. His standard, the red dragon, was later adopted by Henry VII of England, founder of the Tudor dynasty , who claimed descent from Cadwaladr.
The son of Cadwallon ap Cadfan, Cadwaladr was only a child when his father was killed by the army of Oswald of Bernicia at the Battle of Heavenfield, and Cadafael Cadomedd took over in Gwynedd. Raised abroad, either in Ireland, Brittany or in a neighboring Welsh kingdom, Cadwaladr eventually reclaimed his family's throne from Cadafael, and went on to challenge the West Saxons in Somerset in 658, unsuccessfully. Cadwaladr was arguably the last Welsh ruler to mount a serious counteroffensive against the Anglo-Saxon forces that had overrun England since the fall of the Western Roman Empire. It may be for this reason that Geoffrey of Monmouth chose to end his narrative of British kings with Cadwaladr.

After these initial military escapades, Cadwaladr seemingly settled down and focused on the domestic situation, establishing several religious foundations in Gwynedd and gaining a reputation as a devout, pious leader; so much so that, after his death, the Welsh church came to regard him as a saint.

According to the Annales Cambriae, he died of plague in 682. Other sources suggest he may have been the victim of an earlier plague, in 663/664, but such an early death would seem to extend the reign of his successor, Idwal to an improbable length.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
0630 - 0690 Alain II Hir 60 60 0602 - 0658 Juduael 56 56 0632 Gradlon Flam 0580 Hoel III Fratelle verch Osoche Alain I Azenor 0534 - 0547 Hoel II 13 13 Rimo verch Rhun 0491 - 0545 Hoel I Mawr 54 54 Alma Pompea de Domnonee Tewdr Mawr 0470 - 0544 Budic de Bretagne 74 74 0468 Elaine verch Gwyrlys 0448 - 0478 Erich ap Aldrien 30 30 1091 - 1160 Madog ap Maredydd 69 69 1047 - 1125 Maredydd ap Bleddyn 78 78 Meredith adopted the "black lion of Powys" argent a lion rampant sable in substitution for his father's arms: or a lion rampant gules. He married 1st Efa, daughter of Blettrus ap Ednowain Bendew, married 2nd Hunnydd.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 309)

Maredudd ap Bleddyn (died 1132) was a prince of Powys in eastern Wales.
Maredydd was the son of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn who was king of both Powys and Gwynedd. When Bleddyn was killed in 1075, Powys was divided between his three of his sons, Iorwerth, Cadwgan and Maredudd.
Maredydd initially appears to have been the least powerful and the least mentioned in the chronicles. The three brothers held their lands as vassals of Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury. In 1102 the Earl was summoned to answer charges at the court of King Henry I of England and responded by rising in rebellion against the king. All three brothers initially supported Robert and took up arms on his behalf, pillaging Staffordshire. The king deputed William Pantulf to detatch Iorwerth, who was considered to be the most powerful of the three brothers, from his alliance with Robert and his own brothers by the promise of large gifts of land. William succeeded in this, and Iorwerth, after leading a large Welsh force to help the king defeat and banish Earl Robert, then captured his brother Maredudd and handed him over to the king.

Maredydd escaped from captivity in 1107 but did not gain any real power. In 1113 he was apparently acting as penteulu or captain of the guard to his nephew, Owain ap Cadwgan who had taken over as prince of Powys. In this capacity in 1113 Maredudd was able to capture Madog ap Rhiryd, who had killed two of his brothers, Iorwerth and Cadwgan in 1111. Maredudd sent him to Owain, who took vengeance for the killing of his father by blinding Madog.

In 1114 when King Henry I of England invaded Wales, Maredudd quickly made his peace with him, while Owain allied himself with Gruffydd ap Cynan of Gwynedd to oppose the invasion. It was not until Owain was killed in 1116 that Maredudd began to strengthen his position and became ruler of Powys. In 1116 he is recorded as sending 400 men to help Hywel ab Ithel, who ruled Rhos and Rhufoniog under the protection of Powys, against his neighbours, the sons of Owain ab Edwin of Dyffryn Clwyd. Hywel won a victory at the battle of Maes Maen Cymro, near Ruthin, but received wounds of which he died six weeks later. This enabled the sons of Gruffydd ap Cynan to annex these lands for Gwynedd, with Maredudd unable to prevent them.

In 1121 Maredudd carried out raids on Cheshire which provoked King Henry into invading Powys. Maredudd retreated into Snowdonia and asked Gruffydd ap Cynan for assistance. However Gruffydd was in no mood to defy the king on Maredudd's behalf, and Maredudd had to purchase peace at a cost of a fine of 10,000 head of cattle. Gwynedd continued to put pressure on Powys, with the sons of Gruffydd ap Cynan, Cadwallon and Owain Gwynedd annexing more territory in 1124. Cadwallon was killed in a battle with the men of Powys near Llangollen in 1132 which put a halt to further encroachment for the time being. Maredudd did not take part in this battle and died the same year, remembered by the annalist of Brut y Tywysogion as the beauty and safety of all Powys and her defender. He was succeeded by his son, Madog ap Maredudd.
(Wikipedia)
1063 Hunydd verch Einydd 1123 Llewelyn ap Madog 1125 Owain ap Madog 1127 Elise ap Madog 1131 Gwenllian verch Madog 1133 - 1191 Gruffydd ap Madog 58 58 1090 - 1128 Gruffydd ap Maredydd 38 38 King Griffith ap Meredith, submitted with his father to Henry I. and was summoned by that monarch to his baronial parliaments. He bore for arms: Or a lion's gamb, erased in bend gu, and took active part in the feuds and warfare of that period, and died in the lifetime of his father in 1128, leaving by his wife Geverfyl an only child, Owen.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 309)
1025 Haer verch Cillin 0993 Cillin ap Blaidd 1020 Einudd ap Gwernwy 1024 Eva verch Llewelyn 1020 Llewelyn ap Dolphyn 0994 Gwernwy ap Gwrgeneu 0998 Gwenllian verch Rhys 0760 - 0845 Ragnar "Lodbrock" Sigurdsson 85 85 # Note: He was a semi-legendary King.
# Note:
# Note:

    He is said to possibly be the Ragnar who entered the Seine in 845 with 120 ships. Charles the Bald deployed his army on both sides of the river and Ragnar attacked and routed the smaller contingent and hung 111 prisoners on an island in full
    viewof the other Frankish force who offered no more resistance. Ragnar sailed into Paris and sacked it on Easter Sunday. Charles the Bald paid him 7000 pounds of silver to depart in peace and thus gained six years free of invasion.

# Note:
# Note:

    Another story says in his old age he became jealous of his son's reknown as vikings and raided Northumberland and was captured by King Ella who threw him in a snake pit. As he was being bitten he sang his death song starting each stanza with
    "Downwe hewed them with our swords" and in his dying breath prophesized, "How piglets would grunt if they know the plight of the boar!"

# Note:
# Note: His sons did avenge his death by capturing King Ella, carved a "blood eagle" on his back, hacked out his ribs and pulled his lungs out spreading them across his back like wings.
# Note:
# Note:

    Yes, Bjørn Ironside certainly played an important role in France. His father Ragnar Lodbrok can be identified in contemporary Frankish annals with his nickname Lodbrok translated to Hoseri (in German language Hosen), meaning fur or leather
    breeches. Variations are Ogier and Oschery. He operated from the Seine to the border of Spain from 840 to 851. He conquered Aquitania from the Franks, and he used Bordeaux as his stronghold for years. This conquer, one out of more, included
    Poitou, which in the sagas is called Peita. Saxo is saying Petiæ and that Ragnar conquered Petiæ. this is confirmed in annals. This is the district in the Loire area. In Western Europe his sons are more reported. Ragnar Lodbrok himself were
    operating more in East Europe.

# Note:
# Note: Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
# Note: Page: Brynjulf Langballe, 21 Sep 2000
# Note:
# Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 103
# Note:
# Note: Title: Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev, by Rupert Alen & Anna Dahlquist, 1997, King's River Publ.
# Note: Page: 76-7

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tamer&id=I15270
0594 Alcfrith of Mercia 1148 Marared verch Madog 1065 - 1162 Angharad verch Owain 97 97 1025 - 1075 Bleddyn ap Cynfyn 50 50 Bleddyn was the son of Cynfyn ap Gwerstan of the princely house of Mathrafal, and Angharad, daughter of Maredudd ab Owain of the Dinefwr dynasty of Deheubarth. Bleddyn was married to Hear of Powys. When Gruffydd ap Llywelyn was killed by his own men after being defeated by Harold Godwinson in 1063, his realm was divided among several princes. Bleddyn and his brother Rhiwallon submitted to Harold and from him received Gwynedd and Powys. K.L. Maund is of the opinion that Bleddyn ruled Gwynedd and Rhiwallon Powys. In 1067 Bleddyn and Rhiwallon joined with the Mercian Eadric the Wild in an attack on the Normans at Hereford, then in 1068 allied with Earl Edwin of Mercia and Earl Morcar of Northumbria in another attack on the Normans.

Bleddyn was challenged by the two sons of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, but defeated them at the battle of Mechain in 1070, one being killed and the other dying of exposure after the battle. Bleddyn's brother Rhiwallon was also killed in this battle, and he ruled Gwynedd and Powys alone until his death. He was killed in 1075 by Rhys ab Owain of Deheubarth and the nobility of Ystrad Tywi in South Wales, a killing which caused much shock throughout Wales. When Rhys ab Owain was defeated in battle and forced to become a fugitive by Bleddyn's cousin and successor as king of Gwynedd, Trahaearn ap Caradog in 1078 and killed by Caradog ap Gruffydd of Gwent shortly afterwards, this was hailed as "vengeance for the blood of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn".

He was responsible for a revision of Welsh law in the version used in Gwynedd. After his death Gwynedd was seized by Trahaearn ap Caradog and later recovered for the line of Rhodri the Great by Gruffydd ap Cynan, but in Powys Bleddyn was the founder of a dynasty which lasted until the end of the 13th century.
(Wikipedia)
0861 - 0909 Cadell ap Rhodri 48 48 Cadell, the 2nd son of Rhodri Mawr, succeeded to the Kingdom of South Wales, which was called Deheubarth, their residence being Dynevor or Dmasvawr, the Great Palace. The fatal policy of Roderick in dividing his dominions soon became apparent from the conduct of his sons. For in 892/3 we find Anarawd uniting with the English against his brother Cadell; when they invaded his territory and devastated the country of Cardigan and the vale of Towy. And again we find Cadell, Prince of South Wales, taking forcible possession of Powis on the death of his brother Mervyn in 901. Cadell died in 907, leaving three sons: Howell Dha, i. e., Howell, the Good, Meyric and Clydawc, of whom the latter was killed by his brother Meyric about 917.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 800)

CADELH who became Prince of South Wales 877; took Powys from his brother Merfyn.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 181)
0859 - 0901 Merfyn ap Rhodri 42 42 0862 Aeddan ap Rhodri 0863 Tudwal ap Rhodri 0865 Meurig ap Rhodri 0866 Rhodri ap Rhodri 0867 Gwriad ap Rhodri 0869 Gwyddelig ap Rhodri 0870 Nest verch Rhodri 0871 Angharad verch Rhodri Nest verch Cadell 0738 Gwriad ap Elidir 0768 Cadrod ap Gwriad 0591 - 0633 Cadwallon ap Cadfan 42 42 Cadwallon became king upon his father's death around the year 625. It was probably not long afterward that Edwin of Northumbria launched an offensive against Gwynedd and invaded Anglesey. Cadwallon was defeated and forced to flee to Priestholm (a small island off eastern Anglesey), where he was besieged by Edwin, and then to Ireland, and finally to Brittany. Cadwallon subsequently led an army into Dumnonia around the year 630. There he encountered the Mercians, who were besieging Exeter, and entered into an alliance with their king, Penda. He subsequently regained Gwynedd with a victory at Long Mountain and, with Penda (whose sister Cadwallon married), marched on into Northumbria. The war that followed culminated in a battle at Hatfield Chase on October 12, 633, which ended in the defeat and death of Edwin. After this, the Kingdom of Northumbria fell into disarray, divided between its sub-kingdoms of Deira and Bernicia, and Cadwallon exploited the situation by continuing to raid and ravage the country, although without the participation of Penda. He captured York and, when it was besieged by the king of Deira, Osric, his forces broke out of the siege; Osric was killed. The king of Bernicia, Eanfrith, was also killed by Cadwallon after attempting to negotiate peace. However, Cadwallon's army was exhausted and poorly prepared when it was confronted by an army under Eanfrith's successor in Bernicia, Oswald, at Heavenfield. Cadwallon's army fled after a battle and he was killed. Cadwallon ap Cadfan of Gwynedd Cadwallon became king upon his father's death around the year 625. It was probably not long afterward that Edwin of Northumbria launched an offensive against Gwynedd and invaded Anglesey. Cadwallon was defeated and forced to flee to Priestholm (a small island off eastern Anglesey), where he was besieged by Edwin, and then to Ireland, and finally to Brittany. Cadwallon subsequently led an army into Dumnonia around the year 630. There he encountered the Mercians, who were besieging Exeter, and entered into an alliance with their king, Penda. He subsequently regained Gwynedd with a victory at Long Mountain and, with Penda (whose sister Cadwallon married), marched on into Northumbria. The war that followed culminated in a battle at Hatfield Chase on October 12, 633, which ended in the defeat and death of Edwin. After this, the Kingdom of Northumbria fell into disarray, divided between its sub-kingdoms of Deira and Bernicia, and Cadwallon exploited the situation by continuing to raid and ravage the country, although without the participation of Penda. He captured York and, when it was besieged by the king of Deira, Osric, his forces broke out of the siege; Osric was killed. The king of Bernicia, Eanfrith, was also killed by Cadwallon after attempting to negotiate peace. However, Cadwallon's army was exhausted and poorly prepared when it was confronted by an army under Eanfrith's successor in Bernicia, Oswald, at Heavenfield. Cadwallon's army fled after a battle and he was killed.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
0580 - 0625 Cadfan ap Iago 45 45 The son of King Iago, he likely assumed the crown of Gwynedd around 615, shortly after the Battle of Caer-Legion (also known as Chester), during which the forces of Gwynedd were defeated by Æthelfrith of Bernicia. Despite Æthelfrith's military victories, Cadfan continued to provide haven for Edwin of Northumbria, whom Æthelfrith regarded as a major threat.

Cadfan was generally considered to have been a wise and just ruler, noted for his ability to maintain the rule of law and peace during an increasingly hostile period in British history. His memorial stone at Llangadwaladr Church in Anglesey refers to him as "Catamanus rex sapientisimus opinatisimus omnium regum" (="King Cadfan the wisest and most renowned of all kings"). He was succeeded by his son Cadwallon.

He was one of the last of the legendary kings of the Britons as accounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

CADWAN was made Governor of the territory theretofore ruled by the Kings of the Britons and maintained honor and peace for, although a war with the Northumbrian Saxons was intended, yet by the mediation of friends a peace was concluded; died 635; married Acea, the divorced queen of Ethelred, King of Northumberland.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 180)
0569 Tandreg verch Cynan 0560 - 0616 Iago ap Beli 56 56 The most notable feature of his reign (of which little information exists) is the growing strength of the nearby kingdoms of Mercia, under the rule of Pybba and his son Penda, and of Bernicia/Northumbria, under Æthelfrith. Some evidence exists to suggest that Iago may have entered into some sort of alliance with Pybba, trading the latter's promise not to attack Gwynedd in exchange for Gwynedd's support against Northumbria, should that support be needed. In 604, after being driven from his throne by Æthelfrith, Edwin, king of Deira, sought refuge at the Iago's court. As a result, Æthelfrith turned his wrath against Gwynedd, slaughtering the monks at a monastery at Bangor, and finally facing the forces of Gwynedd and Powys at the Battle of Caer-Legion (Chester) in 613.

It is not known whether or not Iago took part in this battle: he may have done so, perishing amidst the slaughter, or he may have already abdicated his throne in favor of his son, Cadfan, and died later than year in a monastery.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
0517 - 0599 Beli ap Rhun 82 82 Beli ap Rhun (c. 517-599, reigned from c. 586) was king of Gwynedd. Very little is known about his reign, which suggests he ruled relatively unremarkably during a time of comparative peace and stability. He was succeeded by his son Iago.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
0492 - 0586 Rhun ap Maelgwn 94 94 Ascending to the throne of what was then the most powerful kingdom of Britain in his twenties upon the death of his father, Maelgwn Hir ap Cadwallon, from plague, Rhun soon found himself embroiled in a dynastic dispute with Elidyr Llydanwyn, king of Rheged. Elidyr had married Rhun's sister, and as a result believed himself to be the proper heir to the throne of Gwynedd. Elidyr's attempted invasion of Gwynedd, proved unsuccessful, and Elidyr himself was killed in the attempt. Elidyr's cousins, however, Rhydderch Hen of Strathclyde, and Clydno Eiten of Lothian, remained bitter rivals of Rhun, and of his half-brother, Brude, leader of the Picts to the south. Rhydderch and Clydno, aided by Elidyr's brother Cinmarc, raided and sacked the town of Arfon (now Caernarfon) in Anglesey.

Raising an army from all over northern Wales, Rhun retaliated, marching unopposed through Rheged and across the Pennines to York, effectively seizing control of all of north Wales and northern England and, through alliance with Brude, even stretching south in the lands held by the Picts. Though his authority was recognized by all, Rhun lacked the resources to maintain administrative control over such a large area, and eventually made peace with Peredur of York and returned to Gwynedd, probably towards the mid-560s. Rhun reigned for another two decades, but little else is heard of him.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
0496 Perwyr verch Rhun 0471 Gwallwen verch Afallach verch Maelgwn 0460 - 0534 Cadwallon ap Einion 74 74 Cadwallon Lawhir ('Long Hand'), was a king of Gwynedd.
According to tradition, Cadwallon ruled during, or shortly after, the Battle of Mons Badonicus, and King Arthur's victory over the Saxons (depending on which date you believe, said battle accorded either sometime between the early 490s and the mid 510s). Although it is unlikely that Cadwallon himself was present at the event, he would likely have benefitted from the period of relative peace and prosperity throughout Britain that it procured. The most momentous military achievement of Cadwallon's reign was the final expulsion of Irish settlers on Ynys Mon (Anglesey), and the absorption of that island, which would later become the cultural and political base of the kingdom, into Gwynedd.

Cadwallon's second name, Lawhir, referred to an actual physical characteristic of the man: he apparently had unusually long arms. Iolo Goch claims that he could "reach a stone from the ground to kill a raven, without bending his back, because his arm was as long as his side to the ground."

According to Gildas, Cadwallon's son, Maelgwn, murdered his uncle to ascend to the throne, which suggests that someone other than Maelgwn himself inherited the kingdom upon Cadwallon's death. No clear evidence exists as to who this "lost king" might be (assuming, of course, that Gildas's account is reliable), but some have suggested the name of Owain Danwyn ('White-Tooth') as the unfortunate heir/victim.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
0446 Meddyf verch Maeldaf 0420 - 0500 Einion ap Cunedda 80 80 Einion ap Cunedda (c.420 - 500; reigned from the 470s) (Latin: Engenius; English: Enoch), also known as Einion Yrth ('the Impetuous') was a king of Gwynedd. One of the sons of Cunedda, it is believed he traveled with his father to North Wales in the early 450s to expel Irish raiders from the region. After his father's death, Einion inherited control over the newly founded kingdom of Gwynedd. Aided by his brother Ceredig, ruler of Ceredigion, and his nephew Meirion, ruler of Meirionnydd, Einion built upon his father's successes and further established his family's rule in the region. He was succeeded by two sons; Cadwallon Lawhir and Owain Ddantgwyn.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
0422 Prawst verch Tidlet Owen ap Einion 0386 - 0460 Cunedda ap Edern 74 74 Originally from the Votadini of the Clackmannanshire region of Scotland, Cunedda was chosen by the northern Welsh to help in their fight against Irish invaders. He subsequently became king of the northern region of Wales and settled in the area with his family, which included his nine sons. The kingdom of Gwynedd was named after him; Cardigan (Welsh language, "Ceredigion") and Merioneth ("Meirionydd") were named after his two sons Ceredig and Meirion.

Cunedda ap Edern (c. 386–c. 460; reigned from the 440s or 450s) (Latin: Cunetacius; English: Kenneth), also known as Cunedda Wledig ('the Imperator'), was an important early Welsh leader, and the progenitor of the royal dynasty of Gwynedd.

The name 'Cunedda' derives from the Brythonic word counodagos, meaning 'good lord'. His genealogy is traced back to Padarn Beisrudd, which literally translates as Paternus of the Scarlet Robe. One traditional interpretation identifies Padarn as a Roman (or Romano-British) official of reasonably high rank who had been placed in command of Votadini troops stationed in the Clackmannanshire region of Scotland in the 380s or earlier by the Emperor Magnus Maximus. Alternatively, he may have been a frontier chieftain who was granted Roman military rank, a practice attested elsewhere along the empire's borders at the time. In all likelihood, Padarn's command in Scotland was assumed after his death by his son, Edern (Latin: Æturnus), and then passed to Edern's son, Cunedda.

Cunedda and his forebears led the Votadini against Pictish and Irish incursions south of Hadrian's Wall. Sometime after this, the Votadini troops under Cunedda relocated to North Wales in order to defend the region from Irish invasion. Cunedda established himself in Wales, in the territory of the Venedoti, which would become the centre of the kingdom of Gwynedd. Two explanations for these actions have been suggested: either Cunedda was acting under the orders of Maximus (or Maximus's successors) or Vortigern, the high king of the British in the immediate post-Roman era. The range of dates (suggested by PC Bartrum) runs from the late 370s, which would favor Maximus, to the late 440s, which would favor Vortigern.

The suggestion that Cunedda was operating under instructions from Rome has been challenged by several historians. David Dumville dismisses the whole concept of transplanting foederati from Scotland to Wales in this manner, especially given the political state of sub-Roman Britain which may not have been able to exhibit such centralised control by the fifth century. As Maximus himself was dead by the end of 388, and Constantine III departed from Britain with the last of Rome's military forces in 407, less than a generation later, it is doubtful that Rome had much direct influence over the military actions of the Votadini, either through Maximus or any other emissary, for any significant length of time.

Maximus (or his successors) may have handed over control of the British frontiers to local chieftains at an earlier date; with the evacuation of the fort at Chester (which Mike Ashley, incidentally, argues is most likely where Cunedda established his initial base in the region, some years later) in the 370s, he may have had little option. Given that the archaeological record demonstrates Irish settlement on the Llyn peninsula however and possible raids as far west as Wroxeter by the late 4th century, it is difficult to conceive of either Roman or allied British forces having presented an effective defence in Wales.

Cunedda's supposed grandson Maelgwn Hir ap Cadwallon was a contemporary of Gildas, and according to the Annales Cambriae died in 547. The reliability of early Welsh genealogies is not uncontested however, and many of the claims regarding the number and identity of Cunedda's heirs did not surface until as late as the 10th century. Nonetheless, if we accept this information as valid, calculating back from this date suggests the mid-5th century interpretation.

Of Cunedda personally even less is known. Probably celebrated for his strength, courage, and ability to rally the beleaguered Romano-British forces of the region, he eventually secured a politically advantageous marriage to Gwawl, daughter of Coel Hen, the Romano-British ruler of Eboracum (modern York), and is claimed to have had nine sons. Cardigan (Welsh: Ceredigion) and Merioneth (Welsh: Meirionnydd) were supposedly named after his two sons Ceredig and Meirion.
0388 Gwawl verch Coel Meirion ap Cunedda 0420 Ceredig ap Cunedda 0364 Edern ap Padarn 0339 Padarn ap Tegid Padarn Beisrudd ap Tegid literally translates as Paternus of the Scarlet Robe, son of Tegid. His father may have borne the Roman name of Tacitus. Padarn is believed to have been born in the early 4th century in the Old North (or Yr Hen Ogledd) of Roman Britain. According to Old Welsh tradition, his grandson, Cunedda certainly came from Manaw Gododdin, the modern Clackmannanshire region of Scotland.

One traditional interpretation identifies Padarn as a Roman (or Romano-British) official of reasonably high rank who had been placed in command of Votadini troops stationed in Clackmannanshire in the 380s or earlier by the Emperor Magnus Maximus. Alternatively, he may have been a frontier chieftain in the same region who was granted Roman military rank, a practice attested elsewhere along the empire's borders at the time.

His command in modern Scotland likely lasted till his death and was then assumed by his son Edern. Edern was the father of Cunedda, founder of the Kingdom of Gwynedd.
(Wikipedia)
0314 Tegid ap Cein Cein ap Guorcein Guorcein ap Doli Doli ap Guordoli Guordoli ap Dumn Dumn ap Gurdumn Gurdumn ap Amguoloyt Amguoloyt ap Anguerit Anguerit ap Ouman Ouman ap Dubun Dubun ap Brithgein Brithgein ap Eugein Eugein ap Amalech Amalech ap Beli 0544 Cynan ap Brochwel D. 0808 Cadell ap Brochwel Cyngen ap Cadell D. 0773 Brochfael ap Elisedd D. 0775 Elisedd ap Gwylog Elisedd ap Gwylog (died c. 755), also known as Elise was king of Powys in eastern Wales.

Little has been preserved in the historical records about Elisedd, who was a descendant of Brochwel Ysgithrog. He appears to have reclaimed the territory of Powys after it had been overrun by the English. His great-grandson, Cyngen ap Cadell erected a column in his memory which stands not far from the later abbey of Valle Crucis. This is known as the Pillar of Eliseg, but the form Eliseg which appears on the column is thought to be a mistake by the carver of the inscription.

The Latin inscription on the pillar is now very hard to read, but was apparently clearer in the time of Edward Lhuyd who transcribed it. The translation of the part of the inscription referring to Elisedd is as follows:

+ Concenn son of Catell, Catell son of Brochmail, Brochmail son of Eliseg, Eliseg son of Guoillauc.
+ And that Concenn, great-grandson of Eliseg, erected this stone for his great-grandfather Eliseg.
+ The same Eliseg, who joined together the inheritance of Powys . . . out of the power of the Angles with his sword and with fire.
+ Whosoever repeats the writing, let him give a blessing on the soul of Eliseg.
Some old poems refer to Elisedd and assert he had a "special crown, a chain of twisted gold links, and armlets and anklets of gold which were the badges of sovereignty of Powys". These artifacts have disappeared from history but perhaps resurfaced briefly during the coronation of Owain Glyndwr in 1400.
(Wikipedia)
D. 0725 Gwylog ap Beli Sanant verch Nowy D. 0695 Beli ap Eiludd Beli ap Eiludd was a 7th century King of of Powys.

Some theories assert that he was infact the son of Manwgan ap Selyf who regained power after Eiludd Powys was killed at the battle of Battle of Maes Cogwy in 642.
(Wikipedia)
Manwgan ap Selyf Manwgan ap Selyf was an early 7th century King of Powys, the son of Selyf Sarffgadau.

One theory asserts that when Manwgan ap Selyf came to the thrown in 613 he was a young boy, which led to an invasion of Powys by Eluadd ap Glast (alias Eiludd Powys), the erstwhile King of Dogfeiling. The usurper probably managed to hold the throne for some thirty years or more before he was killed fighting the Northumbrians, possibly at the Battle of Maes Cogwy (Oswestry) in 642. The Dogfeiling dynasty was finally crushed by the Saxons around 656, and Manwgan was able to take his rightful place on the Powysian throne.
King of Powys 613, 642?-655?
(Wikipedia)
D. 0616 Selyf ap Cynan Selyf ap Cynan, (Battle-Serpent) (610 - 613)
Selyf ap Cynan or Selyf Sarffgadau (died 616) appears in Old Welsh genealogies as an early 7th century King of Powys, the son of Cynan Garwyn.

His name is a Welsh form of Solomon, appearing in the oldest genealogies as Selim. He reputedly bore the nickname Sarffgadau, meaning battle-serpent. According to the Annals of Ulster and the Annals of Wales, in 616 he died at the Battle of Chester, fighting against Æthelfrith of Northumbria. The Annals of Ulster entitle him King of the Britons, perhaps because he led a combined force from more than one Brythonic kingdom at that battle against the Northumbrians (the king of Gwynedd, Iago ap Beli, also died there according to the Annals of Wales).
(Wikipedia)
Gwynwenwen of Dalriada D. 0610 Cynan Garwyn ap Brochwel Cynan Garwyn has little more recorded of him than his name and that he was the ruler of lands in the Kingdom of Powys, Wales in the 7th century. Even those records are in poetry or manuscripts written more than two hundred years after he is thought to have lived.

He is thought to be the eldest son of Brochwel Ysgithrog and father of Selyf Sarffgadau, and usually considered as a Prince of Powys who held authority for a period between those two. Some genealogies record that he married Gwenwynwyn 'of the Scots'.

It is sometimes argued that he died with his son at the Battle of Chester in circa AD 613 but any precise description would be based more on the desire to create a myth of the foundation of a dynasty or legend of Powsyian glory than on available evidence.
(Wikipedia)
D. 0560 Brochwel Ysgithrog ap Cyngen Brochwel ap Cyngen (died c. 560), better known as Brochwel Ysgrithrog, was a king of Powys in Eastern Wales. The unusual nickname Ysgithrog has been translated as ‘of the canine teeth’, ‘the fanged’ or ‘of the tusk’ (perhaps because of big teeth, horns on a helmet or, most likely, his aggressive manner).

Brochwel was the son of King Cyngen Glodrydd and his wife St. Tudlwystl, a daughter of Brychan ap Gwyngwen ap Tewdr. As far as is known Brochwel married Arddyn Benasgel, sometimes written Arddun Penasgell (Wing Headed), daughter of King Pabo Post Prydain. They were the parents of King Cynan Garwyn and Saint Tysilio, the founder of the old church at Meifod.

Powys has been frequently called "the land of Brochwel", but little is recorded of the events of this monarch's reign. Some details are available from Old Welsh poetry, but this is difficult to interpret, and none of the extant poems about this period seem to pre-date the 9th century. Some are from as late as the 11th century. Brochwel is presented as a warrior hero and ruler of wide lands. These sources suggest that he was passionately fond of hunting, and one of his chief resorts was the Vale of Meifod which he made his "May-Abode" or summer residence. On his summer visits to Mathrafal, he often visited the shrine of St. Gwyddfarch. Upon his saintly son, St Tysilio, he bestowed the Bishopric of that part of his kingdom. St Tysilio and Brochwel are linked with the foundation of the Church at Meifod, but none of the stones of the current Church of St. Mary date from this period.

The arms later assigned by the College of Arms to Brochwel, and that can be used by his male heirs, are ‘Sable, three nags' heads, erased argent’ which may represent three beheaded Saxon white horses. Many later tribes and family lines in the area claim descent from Brochwel and include his arms within theirs. Most of the genealogies of these families were first documented by the heralds in the 16th century when the view taken of Brochwel can be illustrated by the following quotation (which is mainly judged to be false by contemporary historians):

"Brochwel Yscithroc, Consul of Chester, who dwelt in a town then called Pengwerne Powys, and now Shrewsbury (Salopia), whose dwelling house was in the verie same place where the college of St Chad's now standeth." - Dr Powel's Historie of Cambrie (1584 edition)

Pengwern was certainly a Welsh kingdom or Royal residence which appears to have been located somewhere in Shropshire. It is unclear whether it was ruled by Brochwel. However there does seem to have been a tradition that he was buried in St. Chad’s College in Shrewsbury which he is said to have founded. Alternatively, some believe that Brochwel was buried at Pentrefoelas in Gwynedd where the grave has been uncovered of a six foot man, with a covering slab bearing the name ‘Brohomagli’.
(Wikipedia)
Arddyn Benasgel verch Pabo Tysilio ap Brochwel Pabo Post Prydain Cyngen Glodrydd Tudlwystl verch Brychan Pasgen ap Cyngen Brychan ap Gwyngwen Gwyngwen ap Tewdr 0552 - 0596 Domangart Mac Aedan 44 44 Domangart may have been a grandson rather than a son of Áedán, most likely another son of Conaing. The main line of Cenél nGabráin kings were the descendants of Eochaid Buide through his son Domnall Brecc, but the descendants of Conaing successfully contested for the throne throughout the 7th century and into the 8th.
(Wikipedia)
0532 - 0608 Aedan of Dalriada 76 76 Aedan mac Gabhran He was the son of Gabhran, king of Dalriada, and became king after the death of his kinsman, King Conall, when he was crowned at Iona by Saint Columba. He refused to allow his kingdom to remain dependent on the Irish Dairiada, but coming into collision with his southern neighbours he led a large force against ¡thelfrith, king of the Northumbrians, and was defeated at a place called Daegsanstane, probably in Liddesdale. He was succeeded by his son, Eochaid Buide. Some consider him a possible historical basis for King Arthur.
(Wikipedia)

Andan or Aedhan, succeeded his cousin Kinatellus, A. D. 570, and received the royal insignia from St. Colomba, a man at that time of such authority that neither King nor people did anything without his consent. Andan or Adrian's first expedition was against the robbers of Galloway, whom he suppressed and severely punished their chiefs, and established justice in the realm. He died A. D. 604, reigned 34 years. Of his three sons, Arthur, Prince of Scotland, and Dongardius were slain in battle against the Picts and Saxons.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 585)Áedán mac Gabráin (Old Irish pronunciation ['aiða?n mak 'gavra?n?]) was king of Dál Riata from circa 574 onwards. The kingdom of Dál Riata was situated in modern Argyll and Bute, Scotland, and parts of County Antrim, Ireland. Genealogies record that Áedán was a son of Gabrán mac Domangairt.

He was a contemporary of Saint Columba, and much that is recorded of his life and career comes from hagiography such as Adomnán of Iona's Life of Saint Columba. Áedán appears as a character in many Old Irish and Middle Irish language works of prose and verse, some now lost.

The Irish annals record Áedán's campaigns against his neighbours, in Ireland, and in northern Britain, including expeditions to the Orkney Islands, the Isle of Man, and the east coast of Scotland. As recorded by Bede, Áedán was decisively defeated by Æthelfrith of Bernicia at the Battle of Degsastan. Áedán may have been deposed, or have abdicated, following this defeat. He died c. 608.

The sources for Áedán's life include Bede's Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum; Irish annals, principally the Annals of Ulster and the Annals of Tigernach; and Adomnán's Life of Saint Columba. Áedán appears as a character in the early Irish works Gein Branduib maic Echach ocus Aedáin maic Gabráin and Compert Mongáin. The Senchus fer n-Alban, a census and genealogy of Dál Riata, records his ancestry and his immediate descendants.

The Rawlinson B. 502 manuscript, dated to c. 1130, contains the tale Gein Branduib maic Echach ocus Aedáin maic Gabráin (The Birth of Brandub son of Eochu and of Aedán son of Gabrán). In this story, Áedán is the twin brother of Brandub mac Echach, a King of Leinster who belonged to the Uí Cheinnselaig kindred. Áedán is exchanged at birth for one of the twin daughters of Gabrán, born the same night, so that each family might have a son. The Prophecy of Berchán also associates Áedán with Leinster. A modern study concludes that "[t]here seems to be no basis of fact behind these traditions".

A lost Irish tale, Echtra Áedáin mac Gabráin (The Adventures of Áedán son of Gabrán) appears in a list of works, but its contents are unknown. Áedán is a character in the epic Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin, but the events which inspired the tale appear to have taken place in the middle of the seventh century.

Áedán was succeeded by his son Eochaid Buide. Adomnán gives an account of Columba's prophecy that Eochaid's older brothers would predecease their father. Áedán's other sons are named by the Senchus fer n-Alban as Eochaid Find, Tuathal, Bran, Baithéne, Conaing, and Gartnait. Adomnán also names Artúr, called a son of Conaing in the Senchus, and Domangart, who is not included in the Senchus. Domangart too may have been a grandson rather than a son of Áedán, most likely another son of Conaing. The main line of Cenél nGabráin kings were the descendants of Eochaid Buide through his son Domnall Brecc, but the descendants of Conaing successfully contested for the throne throughout the 7th century and into the 8th.

It has been suggested that Gartnait son of Áedán could be the same person as Gartnait son of Domelch, king of the Picts, whose death is reported around 601, but this rests on the idea of Pictish matriliny, which has been criticised. Even less certainly, it has been argued that Gartnait's successor in the Pictish king-lists, Nechtan, was his grandson, and thus Áedán's great-grandson.

Of Áedán's daughters, less is known. Maithgemm, also recorded as Gemma, married a prince named Cairell of the Dál Fiatach. The names of Áedán's wives are not recorded, but one was said to be British, and another may have been a Pictish woman named Domelch, if indeed the Gartnait son of Domelch and Gartnait son of Áedán are one and the same.
(Wikipedia)
0532 Domelch of the Picts Eochaid of Dalriada Arthur Dalriada Dongardius Dalriada Tuatrhal Mac Aedan Bran Mac Aedan Conaing Mac Aedan Gartnait Mac Aedan Baithene Mac Aedan Maithgemm verch Aedan 0500 - 0557 Gabhran of Dalriada 57 57 Gabhran mac Domangart Gabhran was a wise and excellent Prince. He first instituted the office of the King's Advocate. He persuaded Loth, a Pictish King, to league with Uter Pendragon, King of the Britons (and who married Pendragon's daughter Ann, sister of King Arthur, of the Round table), against the Anglo-Saxons 502. And when the famous King Arthur mounted the British throne he aided him against the Saxons. Gabhran was at last cut off, for one Toncetus, the Supreme Judge of Capital Crimes, a cruel and covetous man, expecting easy pardon of the King; the enraged people therefore cut him off. But finding they could not obtain the King's mercy, they next slew the King himself at the instigation of one Donald of Athol, 535, reigned thirty-four years. His Queen and children fled to Ireland. (Others say that he died after a tedious sickness and was buried at Icolmkill, the royal burying place). He was succeeded by his nephew, Eugenius III, who instead of revenging his uncle's death, received Donald into favor, which made him suspected of having a hand in the conspiracy; and he was succeeded, in 558, by his brother Congallus, who introduced heraldry, recalled the children of Gabhran, but before they returned he died, 568, reigned ten years, and was succeeded by his younger brother Kintellus, who courteously entertained Aidan, son of Gabhran, and on his deathbed resigned to him..
(Wikipedia)

Gabhran or Gonran or Goran, was a wise and excellent Prince. He first instituted the office of King's Advocate. He persuaded Loth, a Pictish king, to league with Uter Pendragon, King of the Britons. Loth married Pendragon's daughter Ann. She was the sister of King Arthur of the Round Table. They were in battle with the Anglosaxons in 502, and when the famous King Arthur mounted the British throne, Gonran aided him against the Saxons.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 585)
verch Dumnagual Eoganan Mac Gabrain Cuildach Mac Gabrain Domnall Mac Gabrain Domangart Mac Gabrain 0415 - 0507 Domangart of Dalriada 92 92 Domangart I of Dalriada, Domangart mac Fergus was king of Dál Riada from about 501 until 507, following the death of his father, Fergus Mor. He may have joint ruled with his uncle, Aeneas.

Domangart married Feldelm Foltchain, daughter of Brion son of Eochaid Mugmedon, a half-brother to the High King of Ireland Niall of the Nine Hostages. He has at least two sons: Comgall and Gabhran, both of whom became kings in succession. The Tripartite Life of St. Patrick states that he was present at the death of the saint, circa 493. Domangart died around 507 and was succeeded by Comgall.
(Wikipedia)
Fedelmia Foltchain Comgall of Dalriada Kintellus of Dalridia D. 0501 Fergus of Dalriada Fergus I of Dalriada, Fergus Mor Mac Earca He is sometimes considered the father of Scotland. "In AD 498, Fergus Mor Mac Earca, in the twentieth year of the reign of his father, Muredach, son of (Eugenius, or ) Owen, son Niall of the Nine Hostages, with five more of his brothers, viz., another Fergus, two more named Loarn, and two named Aeneas, with a complete army, went into Scotland to assist his grandfather Loarn, who was a King of Dalriada, and who was much oppressed by his enemies the Picts, who were in several battles and engagements vanquished and overcome by Fergus and his party. Whereupon, on the king's death, which happened about the same time, the said Fergus was unanimously elected and chosen king, as being the Blood Royal, by his mother; and the said Fergus was the first absolute king of Scotland, of the Meilesian Race: so the succession continued in his blood and lineage ever since to this day." Four Masters.
(Wikipedia)
D. 0474 Erc of Dalriada Erc was king of Irish Dál Riada until 474. The Annals of the Four Masters imply Erc was the same person as Muirdeach son of Eogan son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, High King of Ireland at the end of the 5th century. Other reports imply he decended from an older royal family dating to Conaire Caem in the 2nd century. Both possibilities remain viable.

Dál Riada began its separation from Ireland during Erc's reign. Its former provinces in Ireland, mostly in modern County Antrim, falling more in line with the High King of Ireland. Erc established his base in Scotland near the area called Argyll, which means 'coastline of the Gaels.'

Erc was probably the father of Fergus Mor, king of Dál Riada, though his immediate succesor was Loarn, a kinsman who probably succeeded through the tanistry law. Assuming Erc was a member of Niall's family, he would also be of the Uí Néill royal line, as would be his descendents. This is supported by his son, Muircheartach becoming High King of Ireland in 504.
(Wikipedia)
0368 Marca D. 0465 Eogan Macneill Eugenius
Eogan, son of Niall Noígiallach, was an Irish king founded the kingdom of Tír Eógan (modern County Tyrone) in the 5th century. He was also the ancestor of the Cenél nEógain dynasty and their septs (O'Neill, O'Docherty, O'Boyle, etc).
(Wikipedia)

Eogan was a close friend of Saint Patrick and received Patricks blessing.[2] With his brother the high king Lóegaire mac Néill (d.462), he was one of the judges in a dispute over the succession to Amalgaid (d.440), king of Connacht among his sons competing to rule their territory of Tir Amalgaidh in northwest Connacht. [3]

Eoghan, King of Tír Eógan, and Prince of InnisEoghan is buried at St. Patrick's Church in Iskaheen, Innishowen, Donegal. A plaque there states "Eoghan Prince of Iniseoghain, Son of Niall of the Nine Hostages. Died 465 of grief for his brother Conall. Baptised by Patrick and buried in Uisce Chaoin"

His sons included Muiredach mac Eógain, his successor in Ailech; Fergus, founder of the Cenél Fergusa; and Echach Binnich, founder of the Cenél mBinnig

Notes

   1. ^ all dates per The Chronology of the Irish Annals, Daniel P. McCarthy
   2. ^ T.M.Charles-Edwards, Early Christian Ireland, pg.51
   3. ^ T.M.Charles-Edwards, Early Christian Ireland, pg.26

The manuscript known as the Laud 610 Genealogies (Oxford, Bodleian Library MS. Laud 610, fo. 75a 1, fifteenth century) gives seven descendant clans of the Cenél nEogain, in the Bredach, as follows:

Croeb choibniusa na Bretcha.

Secht maic Eogain 'sin Brettaig: Fedlimid, Ailill etaid, Cormac, Elann ergna hi fos, Dallan, Echen is Oengus.

Att e in so tellaige na Brettcha. O Fedlimid chetus munter Ruarcain 7 muinter Treblain 7 muinter Slebin 7 cland Muirdelaigh 7 cland Cumsadaigh 7 cland Archon 7 cland Tuathail 7 cland Fortcheirn. O Chormac immorru munter Cele 7 cland Maengaile 7 cland Cerdain 7 cland Fergusa 7 Oe Umail 7 Oe Ultain 7 Oe Ruadne.

O Dallan, Oe Erchen 7 Oe Chuliuin 7 Oe Reocain 7 Oe Chellaig 7 Oe Merain 7 cland Chuan.

O Eilill .i. munter Forcellaig 7 muinter Mailraide 7 Oe Rossaid 7 Oe Gillucain 7 Oe Domnan 7 Oe Chormaic 7 sil Maic Luase.

O Elann .i. Oe Finiain 7 Oe Mianain 7 Oe Hiudir 7 Oe Erchomais 7 Oe Golain 7 Oe Branacain 7 Oe Chellaig 7 Oe Suibne 7 clann Ilgaile.

O Oengus .i. Oe Mailpoil 7 Oe Brolaig 7 Oe Guthartaig 7 Oe Dubaltain 7 Oe Chollai 7 Oe Chellaig.

O Echen Oe Ogain 7 Oe Runaig 7 Oe Raten.

Is he in so anuas minigud croibe coibniusa na Bretcha.

According to the O Clery Book of Genealogies [Story of the Irish Race] Royal Irish Academy, M.790, lines 714 to 718. (Linea Antiqua, RIA MS 23D17, circa 1642) Eogan mac Neill's sons with territory in the Bredach in Inishowen were as follows:

It e annso tellaighe na Bredchha

714. O Fheidlimid, cedus, muinter Ruarcan et muinter Treallan et muinter Slebhin et muinter Muirdelbaigh et clann Cumuscaigh et clann Narchon c: teallach Tuathail et clann Forcheirnn.

715. O Corbmac, uero, muinter Chele, ocus clann Minghoile, ocus clann Cerdan, ocus .h. Mail, et .h. Ultain et .h. Ruaigne.

716. O Dallan, .h. Eircinn, ocus .h. Cuiliun et .h. Reodan, .h. Ceallaigh, .h. Meran, ocus clann Cuan.

717. O Oilill, muinter Forceallaigh et muinter Mail raifthi, ocus .h. Rosaigh et .h. Gillagan, .h. Donnan, .h. Corpmaic, ocus sil meic Gluais, .h. Follamain, .h. Minain, .h. Uidir, .h. Fercumais,.h. Galan, .h. Donnugan uel .h. Branugan, .h. Ceallaigh, .h. Duibne et clann Filgaile.

718. O Oenghus, .h. Mail phoil, ocus .h. Brolaigh et cenel Oenghusa tulcha og (.i. mic Aini et mic Ecruiti). Et asd e an t-Aenghus sin do-choidh in echtra co righ Temra co nderna a muinerus fris, ocus cor fer comlann tar a chenn .i. cath mullaig Fedha et ba coimdith don chath, ocus d'Aenghus cor gair a cu .i. guan ar na cengal do chloich an atha co tainic ba guth an tigerna an cu .i. goan co ro-muigh an cath iertain co tucadh crich imdha, ocus erannus do, cor dhedhail da seacht macaib iertain; mac do, Echrach o tait clann Aenghusa eachrach i nn-ibh Uais breagh; mac ele do a crich fer Cul re Tulen atuaidh o ta clann Aenghusa cul et alii multi. [Translation of Line 718: “From Oenghus [are] Ua Mael Phóil and Ua Brolaigh and Cenél Oenghusa of Tulach Óg (namely, Mic Aini and mic Ecruiti). And it was that Oenghus who went on an expedition to the King of Teamhair (Tara) so that he formed a friendship with him and he fought a conflict on his behalf, namely the battle of Mullach Feadha; and there was destruction as a result of (?) the battle and to Oenghus until he called his hound, namely Guan [which] had been tied to the stone of the ford, so that the hound, namely Guan, came at the call (voice) of his master, so that he won the battle afterwards, so that he was given many territories and land, so that he divided it between (?) his seven sons afterwards. One of his sons [was] Echrach from whom are the Clann Oenghusa in Uibh Uais Breagh; [there was] another son of his in Crích Fer Cúl re Tulen in the north from whom are Clann Oenghus Cúl and many others.”

719. O Echin, uero, atait .h. Ogan et .h. Ruanaigh et .h. Raiten et meg Comaltan.

References

    * Annals of Ulster at CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts at University College Cork
    * Byrne, Francis John (2001), Irish Kings and High-Kings, Dublin: Four Courts Press, ISBN 978-1-85182-196-9
    * Charles-Edwards, T. M. (2000), Early Christian Ireland, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-36395-0
    * Revised edition of McCarthy's synchronisms at Trinity College Dublin.

Aeneas of Dalriada Loarn of Dalriada Muircheartach of Dalridia D. 0430 Niall Noigiallach Niall of the Nine Hostages was a High King of Ireland who was active early-to-mid 5th century, dying - according to the latest estimates - around 450/455. He is said to have made raids on the coastlines of Britannia and Gaul: these raids are usually credited with bringing Saint Patrick to Ireland as a boy according to some hagiographical sources.

The fourth and youngest son of Eochaid Mugmedon, an Irish High King, and Cairenn, the enslaved daughter of a British king, he was the eponymous ancestor, through his sons Conall Gulban, Endae, Eogan, Coirpre, Lóegaire, Maine of Tethba, Conall Cremthainne and Fiachu Fiachach, of the Uí Néill dynasties.

According to legend, Niall was the son of the High King Eochaid Mugmedon and his second wife, Cairenn, daughter of Sachell Balb, king of Britain. When Cairenn became pregnant, Eochaid's first wife, Mongfind, was consumed with jealousy and made Cairenn do heavy work in the hope of forcing her to miscarry. Out of fear of Mongfind, Cairenn exposed her baby, but he was rescued and fostered by Torna the poet. Niall returned to Tara as an adult and rescued his mother from the heavy labour Mongfind had imposed on her.

Mongfind demanded that Eochaid name a successor, hoping it would be one of her sons. Eochaid gave the task to a druid, Sithchenn, who devised a contest between the brothers, shutting them in a burning forge, telling them to save what they could, and judging them based on the objects they emerged with. Niall, who emerged carrying an anvil, was deemed greater than Brion, with a sledgehammer, Fiachrae with bellows and a pail of beer, Ailill with a chest of weapons, and Fergus with a bundle of wood. Mongfind refused to accept the decision.

Sithchenn made the five brothers weapons and they went out hunting. Each brother in turn went looking for water, and found a well guarded by a hideous hag who demanded a kiss in return for water. Fergus and Ailill refused and returned empty-handed. Fiachra gave her a peck, but not enough to satisfy her. Only Niall kissed her properly, and she was revealed as a beautiful maiden, the Sovereignty of Ireland. She granted Niall not only water but the kingship for many generations. Fiachra was granted a minor royal line. After that, Mongfind's sons deferred to Niall.
(This "loathly lady" motif appears in myth and folklore throughout the world. Variations of this story are told of the earlier Irish High Kings Lugaid Laigde and Conn Cétchathach; and in Arthurian legend of Sir Gawain, as told by Geoffrey Chaucer in the Wife of Bath's Tale).
Another tale tells of Mongfind's attempt to poison Niall, but she died after accidentally taking the poison herself.
There are various versions of how Niall gained his epithet Noígiallach. The oldest is that he took a hostage from each of the nine tuatha or petty kingdoms of the Airgialla. The later, better known story is that he took a hostage from each of the five provinces of Ireland (Ulster, Connacht, Leinster, Munster and Meath), and one each from the Scots, Saxons, Britons, and French (or one each from Dalriada, Caledonia, Strathclyde and Northumbria).
Irish sources describe Niall's expeditions to Britain and France, and his reign, as given in the Irish Annals, is roughly contemporaneous with the foundation of Dalriada in Scotland by Irish migrants and the raids by "Scots" on late Roman and post-Roman Britain.
According to later tradition, during one of his many raids on Britain, Niall is believed to have captured the future Saint Patrick and brought him in bondage to Ireland. Many years later Saint Patrick suceeded in escaping to Britain. After many years of study, he returned to Ireland, and played an important early role in the conversion of the Irish to Christianity.

The traditional date for Niall's death is ca. 405, but many modern historians prefer a later date, about 450 or 455. There are various traditions regarding the circumstances of his death. The earliest has him dying at sea in the English Channel, at the hands of the Leinster king Eochaid mac Enna, as he was attempting a raid on Armorica (modern Brittany) in Roman Gaul. Other sources say he died in battle against the Picts in Scotland, or even in the Alps. All traditions are unanimous that he died outside of Ireland. According to legend his followers carried his body back to Ireland, fighting seven battles along the way, and whenever they carried Niall's body before them they were unbeatable.
(Wikipedia)
Roighneach of Britain D. 0464 Conall Gulban Conall Gulban, son of Niall Noígiallach, was an Irish king founded the kingdom of Tír Chonaill in modern County Donegal in the 5th century. He was the ancestor of Saint Colum Cille. The last known kings of Tír Chonnaill (County Donegal) were the Uí Niell. The Peninsula of Inishowen in Donegal was fought for by the Dochartaigh (known modernly as Doherty, Daugherty, Docherty, Dougherty, etc.) clan who were then given the titles as Princes of Donegal.

The most powerful of his descendants were the Dunkeld Royal house of the Kings of Scotland (11th-13th C.), and the O'Donnell clan, Kings of Tirconnel (Conal's land) and Inishowen and Overlords of Connaught as well as many less powerful noble houses of Scotland, Ireland and England. Among his famous descendents were the Washingtons of northern England including one named George.
King Conall Gulban was murdered by the Masraighe in 464 A.D. at Magh Slécht.
(Wikipedia)
Endae Macneill Coipre Macneill He was the son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, who founded a dynasty and gave his name to the barony of Carbury, County Kildare
(Wikipedia)
Loegaire Macneill Maine of Tethba a supposed son of Niall Noigiallach. His existence is very doubtful. Writing of him in 1973, Irish historian Francis John Byrne stated his belief that:
"We may suspect then that eastern Maine was so successfully absorbed into the Ui Neill ambit that their kings, by a polite fiction, were accepted into the dominant dynasty circle ... The fact that the annalistic obit of Maine mac Neill in 440 is so much earlier than that of any of his supposed brothers also suggests that he was adopted into the dynasty some time after the synthetic historians had agreed to push back the date of Niall's reign by a generation or more."
It is actually far more likely that Maine was the ancestor of the Ui Maine, who's kingdom - Hy-Many - once covered a region over the entire of what is now County Galway north and east of Athenry, all of south County Roscommon, and stretching over the River Shannon into the regions called Cenel Maine, Cuircni, Calraige and Delbhna Bethra. Cenel Maine lay in the south-west portion of the kingdom of Tethba - on the east shore of Lough Ree - and when it was taken over by the Uí Néill, its ruler's ancestor was given a pedigree making him a son of Niall.
Hy-Many, however, remained a powerful independent kingdom in its own right for several further centuries.
(Wikipedia)
Conall Cremthainne Fiachu Fiachach D. 0358 Eochaid Mugmedon Eochaid Mugmedon ("slave-lord") was a semi-historical High King of Ireland of the 4th century who was said to be the ancestor of many of Ireland's most significant dynasties, such as the Connachta and the Uí Néill.

By his wife, Mongfind, he had sons Brion, Ailill and Fiachrae. By a slave he captured on a raid in Britain, Cairenn, he had a fourth son, Niall, later known as Niall Noigiallach (Niall of the Nine Hostages).
(Wikipedia)
0291 Cairenn Chasdubh of Britain Mongfind Macfidaig Ailill Maceochaid Brion Maceochaid Fiachrae Maceochaid D. 0350 Murdeach Tireach Muiredach Tirech, son of Fiacha Sraibhtine, was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 4th century. He gained power by exiling the three Collas, who had killed his father. The Collas later returned and tried to provoke him into trying to kill them. When he didn't, they entered his service and led his armies. He was overthrown by Cáelbad. “In the beginning of the fourth century, Muiredeach Tireach, High-King of Ireland, directed his nephews, the three Collas, to face north and win sword land for themselves. On the ruins of the old kingdom of Uladh they founded a new kingdom -- of Oirghialla -- which was henceforth for nearly a thousand years to play an important part in the history of Northern Ireland, and which was possessed afterwards by their descendants, the MacMahons, O'Hanlons, O'Carrolls, and Maguires.” Story of the Irish Race, Seamus MacManus.
(Wikipedia)
0266 Muiron 0252 - 0315 Fiacha Srabhteine 63 63 Fiacha Sraibhtine, son of Cairbre Lifechair, was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 3rd and 4th century. He was overthrown by the three Collas.
(Wikipedia)
Aiofe verch Coel 0214 - 0284 Cairbre Maccormac 70 70 Cairbre Lifechair ("lover of the Liffey"), son of Cormac mac Airt, was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 3rd century. Cairbre was married to Aine Ingen Finn.

Fionn mac Cumhail is said to have died during his reign.
(Wikipedia)
Aine Ingen Finn 0268 Eochaid Doimhlen 0190 - 0255 Cormac Ulfada Mac Airt 65 65 Cormac Mac Airt (son of Art), aka Cormac Ua Cuinn (grandson of Conn) or Cormac Ulfada (long beard), is probably the most famous of the ancient High Kings of Ireland, and may have been an authentic historical figure, although many legends have attached themselves to him. He was the son of King Art, son of Conn of the Hundred Battles. He is said to have ruled from Tara, the seat of the High Kings of Ireland, for forty years in the early to mid 3rd century and under his rule Tara flourished. He was famous for his wise, true, and generous judgments. In the Annals of Clonmacnoise, translated in 1627, he is described as....

“ "absolutely the best king that ever reigned in Ireland before himself...wise learned, valiant and mild, not given causelessly to be bloody as many of his ancestors were, he reigned majestically and magnificently". ”

Cormac was conceived when his father, Art, slept with his mistress, Achtan, the night before he fell in the Battle of Maigh Mucruimhe. He played a role in the overthrow of Art's killer, Lugaid mac Con, and his successor Fergus Dubdétach.

Cormac's career is recorded in some detail in the Irish annals. He fought many battles, subduing Ulster and Connacht and leading a lengthy campaign against Munster. He led the first recorded raids on Roman Britain and is credited with gaining territory there, but several times was temporarily dethroned while away from Ireland. He lost an eye in a battle against the Deisi of Meath, whom he expelled into Munster in response.

Many stories have Fionn mac Cumhail living in his time, and the fianna as Cormac's standing army. According to the tale The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Gráinne, Fionn was to marry Cormac's daughter Gráinne, but she ran off with Diarmuid Ua Duibhne.

Although he is usually remembered as a wise and just ruler, one story presents him in a less flattering light. Having distributed all the cattle he had received as tribute from the provinces, Cormac found himself without any cattle to provision his own household after a plague struck his herds. A steward persuaded him to treat Munster as two provinces, the southern of which had never paid tax. He sent messengers to demand payment, but Fiacha Muilleathan, the king of southern Munster, refused, and Cormac prepared for war. His own druids, who had never advised him badly, foresaw disaster, but he ignored them, preferring to listen to five druids from the sidhe supplied by his fairy lover, Báirinn.

Cormac marched to Munster and made camp on the hill of Druim Dámhgaire (Knocklong, County Limerick). His new druids' magic made the camp impregnable and his warriors unbeatable, dried up all sources of water used by the Munstermen, and nearly drove Fiacha to submission. But Fiacha in desperation turned to the powerful Munster druid Mug Ruith for aid, and his magic was too strong even for Cormac's fairy druids. He restored the water and conjured up magical hounds who destroyed the fairy druids. His breath created storms and turned men to stone. Cormac was driven out of Munster and compelled to seek terms.

Cormac owned the wonderful gold cup given to him by the sea-god Manannan mac Lir in the Land of the Living. If three lies were spoken over it, it would break in three; three truths made it whole again. Cormac used this cup during his kingship to distinguish falsehood from truth. When Cormac died, the cup vanished, just as Manannan had predicted it would.

After ruling for forty years Cormac choked to death on a salmon bone. Some versions blame this on a curse laid by a druid because Cormac had converted to Christianity.
(Wikipedia)
0198 Eithne Ollamhdha ingen Cathair 0224 Grainne Maccormac 0150 - 0195 Art Mac Cuinn 45 45 Art mac Cuinn, aka Art Óenfer (the "lone" or "solitary" - he was the only one of his father's many children to survive to adulthood), was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 2nd century. He was the son of Conn of the Hundred Battles and father, with Achtan, of Cormac mac Airt. He died at the Battle of Maigh Mucruimhe against Lugaid mac Con, who had returned from exile with an army of foreigners. In some versions his wife is Medb Lethderg.
(Wikipedia)
0169 - 0195 Maedhbh Leathdearg ingen Conann Cualann 26 26 0135 - 0157 Conn Cetchathach 22 22 Conn Cétchathach (Conn of the Hundred Battles) was a legendary High King of Ireland. He was the ancestor of the Connachta, and, through his descendant Niall Noígiallach, the Uí Néill dynasties. His father was Fedhlimidh Rachtmar and his mother was Ughna Ollchrothach. His son was Art mac Cuinn. Some stories of the Fenian Cycle are set in his time.

He gained the throne by overthrowing Mal, who had killed his father. He earned his epithet Cétchathach in his wars with the Dál nAraidi.

His rival for the kingship of Ireland was the king of Munster, Éogan Mór, also known as Mug Nuadat, who beat him in ten battles and took half of Ireland from his control. Mug was able to gain such power because his druid predicted a famine, which he prepared for by storing grain. Ireland is sometimes seen as divided between Leth Cuinn, Conn's Half, in the north, and Leth Moga, Mug's Half, in the south.

Mug was killed when Conn led a night attack against his forces with all of his tribal leaders save one behind him. Conn's forces ultimately overwhelmed Mug's army, and Mug was killed in the process.

Mal's son Tibride Tirech killed Conn at Tara, having sent fifty warrior dressed as women against him from Emain Macha.
(Wikipedia)
0135 Eithne Thaebfota na Laigan 0100 - 0119 Fedhlimidh Rachtmar 19 19 Fedlimid Rechtmar (Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar or Feidhlim the Lawgiver), son of Tuathal Teachtmhar, was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 2nd century. His name comes from the many wise laws he established in Ireland during his reign.

He took the throne by overthrowing Mal, who had killed his father. He instituted a law similar to the Roman lex talionis, that is, an eye for an eye. and died in his sleep after ruling for nine years. The completion of the road construction around Tara is attributed to him.

He had three sons : Conn Cétchathach, Eochaidh Finn and Fiacha Suighde.
(Wikipedia)
0091 Ughna Ollchrothach Eochaidh Finn 0117 Fiacha Suighde 0057 - 0103 Tuathal Teachtmhar 46 46 Tuathal Teachtmhar or Techtmar was a legendary High King of Ireland, reputed to have ruled in the 1st or 2nd century. His name derives from Celtic *Teuto-valos ("leader of the tribe, people") and his epithet may mean "great crossing", "great possession", or "legitimate". He was the ancestor, through his grandson Conn of the Hundred Battles, of the Uí Néill and Connachta dynasties.

Tuathal was the son of a former High King deposed by an uprising of "subject peoples" who returned at the head of an army to reclaim his father's throne.

The oldest source for Tuathal's story, a 9th century poem by Mael Mura of Othain, says that his father, Fiacha Finnfolaidh, was overthrown by the four provincial kings, Éllim of Ulster, Sanb (son of Cet mac Mágach) of Connacht, Foirbre of Munster and Eochaid Ainchenn of Leinster, and that it was Éllim who took the High Kingship. During his rule Ireland suffered famine as God punished this rejection of legitimate kingship. Tuathal, aided by the brothers Fiacha Cassán and Findmall and their 600 men, marched on Tara and defeated Éllim in battle at the hill of Achall. He then won battles against the Ligmuini, the Gailióin, the Fir Bolg, the Fir Domnann, the Ulaid, the Muma, the Fir Ól nÉcmacht and the Érainn, and assembled the Irish nobility at Tara to make them swear allegiance to him and his descendants. Later versions of the story suppress the involvement of the provincial nobility in the revolt, making the "subject peoples" the peasants of Ireland.

The Book of Invasions adds the detail of Tuathal's exile. His mother, Eithne, daughter of the king of Alba (originally meaning Britain, later Scotland), was pregnant when Fiacha was overthrown, and fled to her homeland where she gave birth to Tuathal. Twenty years later Tuathal and his mother returned to Ireland, joined up with Fiacha Cassán and Findmall, and marched on Tara to take the kingship.

The Annals of the Four Masters also mentions a similar revolt a few generations earlier, led by Cairbre Cinnchait, in the year of the death of the High King Crimthann Nia Náir, although his death appears to be unrelated to Cairbre's revolt. On this occasion Crimthann's son Feradach Finnfechtnach is the future king who escaped in his mother's womb, although the Annals claim he returned to reclaim his throne only five years later. The Annals regularly attempt to turn legend into history, but here the attempt is clumsy and unconvincing.

Seathrún Céitinn harmonises the two revolts into one. He has Crimthann hand the throne directly to his son, Feradach, and makes Cairbre Cinnchait, whose ancestry he traces to the Fir Bolg, the leader of the revolt that overthrew Fiacha, killing him at a feast. Cairbre rules for five years, dies of plague and is succeeded by Éllim.

After Éllim had ruled for twenty years, the twenty or twenty-five year old Tuathal was prevailed upon to return. He landed with his forces at Inber Domnainn (Malahide Bay). Joining up with Fiacha Cassán and Findmall and their marauders, he marched on Tara where he was declared king. Éllim gave battle at the hill of Achall near Tara, but was defeated and killed.

Tuathal fought 25 battles against Ulster, 25 against Leinster, 25 against Connacht and 35 against Munster. The whole country subdued, he convened a conference at Tara, where he established laws and annexed territory from each of the four provinces to create the central province of Míde (Meath) around Tara as the High King's territory. He built four fortresses in Meath: Tlachtga, where the druids sacrificed on the eve of Samhain, on land taken from Munster; Uisneach, where the festival of Beltaine was celebrated, on land from Connacht; Tailtiu, where Lughnasadh was celebrated, on land from Ulster; and Tara, on land from Leinster.

He went on to make war on Leinster, burning the stronghold of Aillen (Knockaulin) and imposing the bórama, a heavy tribute of cattle, on the province. One story says this was because the king of Leinster, Eochaid Ainchenn, had married Tuathal's daughter Dairine, but told Tuathal she had died and so was given his other daughter, Fithir. When Fithir discovered Dairine was still alive she died of shame, and when Dairine saw Fithir dead she died of grief.

Tuathal, or his wife Baine, is reputed to have built Ráth Mór, an Iron Age hillfort in the earthwork complex at Clogher, County Tyrone. He died in battle against Mal, king of Ulster, at Mag Line (Moylinny near Larne, County Antrim). His son, Fedlimid Rechtmar, later avenged him.

The Annals of the Four Masters gives the date of Tuathal's exile as 56 AD, his return as 76 and his death as 106. Seathrún Céitinn's Foras Feasa ar Érinn broadly agrees, dating his exile to 55, his return to 80 and his death to 100. The Book of Invasions places him a little later, synchronising his exile to the reign of the Roman emperor Domitian (81-96), his return early in the reign of Hadrian (122-138) and his death in the reign of Antoninus Pius (138-161).
(Wikipedia)
0078 Baine Balbh Dairine of Thathal Fithir of Thathal 0029 - 0055 Fiacha Finnfolaidh 26 26 Fiacha Finnfolaidh, son of Feradach Finnfechtnach, was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 1st century AD. He was overthrown by either Cairbre Cinnchait or Éllim, king of Ulster, in a revolt of the "subject peoples" against the Milesian nobility. His wife, Eithne, pregnant with his son Tuathal Teachtmhar, fled to Scotland.
(Wikipedia)
Eithne of Alba D. 0030 Feradach Finnfechtnach Feradach Finnfechtnach, son of Crimthann Nia Náir, was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 1st century AD. He was said to have had two bull's horns on his head. Sources disagree on his succession to the kingship. The Annals of the Four Masters says his father, Crimthann, was overthrown by Cairbre Cinnchait, and Feradach went into exile before returning to reclaim the kingdom. Seathrún Céitinn, on the other hand, places Cairbre's revolt later and has Feradach simply succeed his father.
(Wikipedia)
D. 0007 Crimhthann Niadhnair Maclughaidh Crimthann Nia Náir also known as Crimthane Ninar (Crimhthann Niadhnair MacLughaidh), son of Lugaid Riab nDerg and Dearbhorgaill of Danemark, was a legendary High King of Ireland in the 1st century AD.

Crimthann was the first High King of Tara who to wear the golden collar of judgement in Gaelic called "Iodhain Morain" *(Odinns Legate). Historically the Iodhain Morain was a torc style collar worn by the kings and chieftans who were descendants of the ancient "Slanganboghe" (golden ring) dynasties of Scandinavia and Ringerike.

According to legend, if a judge who wore this collar attempted to pass a false judgment it would immediately contract, so as nearly to stop his breathing. However, as soon as he reversed such false sentence, the collar would at once enlarge itself and hang loose around his neck.

He went on a famous expedition and returned with a golden chariot, a golden fidchell board inlaid with a hundred gems, a gold-embroidered cloak, a sword inlaid with gold serpents, a silver-bossed shield, a spear and a sling which never missed their mark, and two greyhounds with a silver chain between them. Soon after returning he fell from his horse and died.
(Wikipedia)
Lugaid Macbreas Lugaid Riab nDerg (Riabhdhearg, Réoderg, Sriab nDearg, "Red Stripes", "Lugh Derrik MacBrice (Lughaidh Driabh nDearg MacBreas)") was a legendary High King of Ireland. He was the foster-son of Cúchulainn.

He was a son of the three Findemna (fair triplets), sons of Eochaid Feidlech. The triplets went to war with their father to try and take the High Kingship. The night before the battle their sister Clothra tried to persuade them to call it off, but to no avail. They had no heirs, so she took all three to bed for fear they would die without issue, and Lugaid was conceived. Some texts say his epithet comes from the red stripes that divided his body into three, indicating that he had three fathers. Others, more prosaically, explain his stripes as battle scars.

Incest features further in Lugaid's story. He slept with Clothra himself, conceiving Crimthann Nia Náir.
His foster-father, Cúchulainn, split the Lia Fáil, the coronation stone at Tara which roared when the rightful king stood or sat on it, with his sword when it failed to roar under Lugaid. It never roared again except under Conn of the Hundred Battles.

Lugaid married Derbforgaill (aka known as Borghild), a princess from Scandinavia. This Derbforgaill should not be confused with a woman of the of the same name who married a High King of Ireland approximately 1,000 years later (see Derbforgaill. This Scandinavian princess came came to Ireland in the form of a swan to seek out Cúchulainn, whom she loved, but Cúchulainn shot her down with a stone from his sling which penetrated her womb, and in sucking it out he violated a taboo which meant he could not marry her himself. Instead, he gave her to Lugaid.

One winter the women of Ulster held a competition in which they tried to send their urine furthest into a pillar of snow, saying that the winner would be the most sexually attractive. Derbforgaill won, and out of jealousy the other women beat and mutilated her. When Lugaid arrived home he noticed that the snow on the roof of her house had not melted, and realised she was close to death. He arrived in time to see her die, and died of grief himself.
(Wikipedia)
Darbhorgaill of Denmark Findemna of Finn Eamna In Irish mythology the three Findemna of Finn Eamna (variously interpreted as "fair triplets" or "three fair ones of Emain Macha") were three sons of the High King of Ireland, Eochaid Feidlech. Their names were Bres, Nár and Lothar.

They conspired to overthrow their father. The day before meeting him in battle they were visited by their sister, Clothra, who tried in vain to dissuade them from this course of action. They were childless, so for fear that they might die without an heir Clothra took all three of them to bed, conceiving Lugaid Riab nDerg, son of the three Findemna.
(Wikipedia)
Clothra Maceochaid Eochaid Feidlech Eochu or Eochaid Feidlech ("the enduring"), son of Finn, was, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, a High King of Ireland of the 1st or 2nd century BC. He is best known as the father of the legendary queen Medb of Connacht.

According to the 12th century Lebor Gabála Érenn, he took power when he defeated the previous High King, Fachtna Fáthach, in the Battle of Leitir Rúaid. The Middle Irish saga Cath Leitrech Ruibhe tells the story of this battle. While Fachtna Fáthach was away from Tara on a visit to Ulster, Eochu, then king of Connacht, raised an army, had the provincial kings killed and took hostages from Tara. When news reached Fachtna at Emain Macha, he raised an army of Ulstermen and gave battle at Leitir Rúaid in the Corann (modern County Sligo), but was defeated and beheaded by Eochu. Fergus mac Róich covered the Ulster army's retreat, and Eochu marched to Tara.

Various Middle Irish tales give him a large family. His wife was Cloithfinn, and they had six daughters, Derbriu, Eile, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, and four sons, a set of triplets known as the three findemna, and Conall Anglondach. Derbriu was the lover of Aengus of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Her mother-in-law, Garbdalb, turned six men into pigs for the crime of eating nuts from her grove, and Derbriu protected them for a year until they were killed by Medb. When Conchobar mac Nessa became king of Ulster, Eochu gave four of his daughters, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, to him in marriage in compensation for the death of his supposed father, Fachtna Fáthach. Eithne bore him a son, Furbaide, who was born by posthumous caesarian section after Medb drowned her. Clothru, according to one tradition, bore him his eldest son Cormac Cond Longas, although other traditions make him the son of Conchobar by his own mother, Ness. Medb later left Conchobar, and Eochu set her up as queen of Connacht. Some time after that, Eochu held an assembly at Tara, which both Conchobar and Medb attended. The morning after the assembly, Conchobar followed Medb down to the river Boyne where she had gone to bathe, and raped her. Eochu made war against Conchobar on the Boyne, but was defeated.

The three findemna tried to overthrow their father in the Battle of Druimm Criaich. The night before the battle, their sister Clothru, afraid that they would die without an heir, seduced all three of them, and the future High King Lugaid Riab nDerg, was conceived. The next day they were killed, and their father, seeing their severed heads, swore that no son should directly succeed his father to the High Kingship of Ireland.

He ruled for twelve years, and died of natural causes at Tara, succeeded by his brother Eochu Airem. The Lebor Gabála synchronises his reign with the dictatorship of Julius Caesar (48-44 BC). Geoffrey Keating dates his reign from 94-82 BC;the Annals of the Four Masters from 143-131 BC.
(Wikipedia)
Cloithfinn Bres Maceochaid Nar Maceochaid Lothar Maceochaid Medb of Connacht Derbriu Maceochaid Eile Maceochaid Mugain Maceochaid Eithne Maceochaid Conall Anglondach Finn Eochu Airem Alill Angubae Clothra Maceochaid Sachell of Britain Brion Maceochaid Fidach Dumnagual of Alt Clut Dumnagual I of Alt Clut or simply Dumnagual Hen ("the Old") was the ruler of Alt Clut (modern Dumbarton Rock), probably sometime in the early sixth century. According to the Harleian genealogies, he was the son of a Cinuit, the son of King Ceretic of Alt Clut. He is known to have fathered several sons, including the future King Clinoch and Guipno, the father of the future king Neithon of Alt Clut.
(Wikipedia)
Clinoch of Alt Clut 0440 Cinuit of Alt Clut Cinuit of Alt Clut was according to the Harleian genealogies, the son of Ceretic of Alt Clut, and hence perhaps himself his successor as King of Alt Clut (modern Dumbarton) in the later fifth century. According to the same pedigrees, he was the father of Dumnagual Hen. Nothing else is known about him.
(Wikipedia)
0415 - 0459 Ceretic of Alt Clut 44 44 Ceretic Guletic of Alt Clut was a king of Alt Clut (modern Dumbarton) in the fifth century. He appears in the writings of St. Patrick with the Latin name Corocticus, and this appearance in a contemporary historical source makes him the first historical king. Of Patrick's two surviving letters, one is addressed to this Corocticus, and in it Patrick lambasts the milites Coroctici ("warband of Ceretic") for his involvement with the Picts and the Scots, and for selling newly-christianized Gaels into the hands of the Picts. Ceretic's dates therefore depend on the conclusions of the vast scholarship devoted to discovering the floruit of St Patrick, but the sometime in the fifth century is probably safe. Ceretic appears also in the Harleian genealogies of the rulers of Alt Clut, from which we know his father (Cynloyp), grand-father (Cinhil) and great-grandfather (Cluim). It is from the latter source that we get his nickname, Guletic ("Land-holder"). In the Book of Armagh, he is called Coirthech rex Aloo, "Ceretic, King of the Height [of the Clyde]"
(Wikipedia)
0407 Cynloyp of Alt Clut 0385 Cinhil of Alt Clut Cluim of Alt Clut 0780 Meurig ap Dyfnwallon Gwygan ap Meurig 0755 Dyfnwallon ap Arthen 0730 Arthen ap Seisyll 0885 - 0942 Elise ap Anarawd 57 57 ELIS who was slain with his brother Edward Foel.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 184)
D. 1042 Sitric of Northumberland 0980 Slani O'Brien D. 0981 Olaf CuarAjn Sitricsson 0950 - 1030 Gormflaith Ingen Murchada Mac Finn 80 80 0874 - 0927 Sitric Caoch 53 53 0850 - 0896 Sitric 46 46 0825 - 0873 Ivar 48 48 0915 - 0972 Murchad Mac Finn 57 57 0880 - 0923 Find na Leinster 43 43 0850 - 0917 Mael- Mordai na Leinster 67 67 0820 - 0863 Muirecan na Leinster 43 43 0785 - 0832 Diarmait na Leinster 47 47 0738 - 0785 Ruaidri na Leinster 47 47 0698 - 0738 Faelan na Leinster 40 40 0720 Tualath na Munster 0700 Cathal na Munster 0730 Tairdelbach na Munster 0670 Aodh Caomh na Munster 0640 Conall na Munster 0610 Eochaidh Ball-Dearg na Munster 0580 Cairthenn Fionn Oge Mor na Munster 0550 Blad na Munster 0520 Tal Cass na Heireann 0490 Conall na Heireann 0942 - 1014 Brian Boroimhe na Munster 72 72 0947 Eachraidh Ui Aeda Obda 0955 Blanaid nic Brian 0926 - 0951 Cineadh na Munster 25 25 0910 Be Bind O'Flaherty 0880 - 0942 Lorcan na Munster 62 62 0850 Lachtnae na Munster 0820 Corc na Munster 0790 Anluan na Munster 0760 Maithan na Munster 0730 Tairdelbach na Munster 0875 - 0945 Aurchad O'Flaherty 70 70 0850 - 0896 Murrough O'Flaherty 46 46 0820 Moenach na Connacht 0790 Flaithnia na Connacht 0760 Fiangalach na Connacht 0730 Flann Rodba na Connacht 0682 Amalgaid na Connacht 0620 - 0682 Cenn- Faelad na Connacht 62 62 0580 Colcu na Connacht 0540 Aed na Connacht 0500 Senach na Connacht 0460 - 0502 Dui na Connacht 42 42 0910 Charllus Ui Aeda Odba 0880 Ailill Ui Aeda Odba 0916 Iago ap Idwal 0857 Cadwr ap Cadwr 0882 Seferws ap Cadwr 0830 Cadwr ap Idnerth 0802 Idnerth ap Iowerth 0774 Iorwerth ap Tegonwy 0781 Arianwen verch Brychan 0753 Brychan ap Anlach 0735 Tegonwy ap Teon 0680 Teon ap Gwinau 0640 Gwinau Deufrewddwyd ap Bywyr Law 0600 Bywyr Law Ap Bywdeg 0560 Bywdeg ap Rhun Rhudd 0520 Rhun Rhudd Bwladr ap Llary 0480 Llary ap Casnar Wledig 0420 Casnar Wledig 0450 Therew verch Brydw 0408 Brydw ap Vortigern of Northumberland 0495 Garwynwyn Gerinion of Strathclyde 0490 Ingenach of Strathclyde 0492 Mendog of Strathclyde 0497 Guipno of Strathclyde 0467 Tutgual ap Cinuit 0565 - 0630 Eochu Buide Mac Aedhan 65 65 King of Scoti/Dalraida from 608 to 630. King of Picts. 1080 Ithel ab Einydd 0985 Morgan Gwerngwy ap Eystan 0950 Elystan ap Gwaithfoed 0950 Rhys ap Marchan 0920 Marchan ap Cynwring 0900 Gweirydd ap Cynwring 0990 Dolfyn ap Llwelyn 0960 Llwelyn Eurdorchog ap Cole 0930 Coel ap Gweirydd 0900 Gweirydd ap Cynwring 0983 Crisli ferch Iago 0965 Gwair ap Pill Sources:

   1. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 12 
1020 Tangwystl ferch Iago 0945 Pill ap Cynwrig Sources:

   1. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 12 
0920 Cynwrig ap Cynddelw Sources:

   1. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 12 
0882 Cynddelw Gam ab Elgudy 0925 Gweirydd Gweryd ap Cynddelw 0840 Elgundy ap Gwrysnad Sources:

   1. Title: Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry; Thomas Allen Glenn {1892}
      Page: 24
   2. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 12 
0805 Gwrysnad ap Dwyng Lyth Sources:

   1. Title: Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry; Thomas Allen Glenn {1892}
      Page: 24
   2. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 12 
0760 Dwyng Lyth ap Llythyraur Sources:

   1. Title: Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry; Thomas Allen Glenn {1892}
      Page: 24 
0724 Llythyraur ap Tegog Sources:

   1. Title: Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry; Thomas Allen Glenn {1892}
      Page: 24
   2. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 12, combines this generation with followin generation 
0690 Tegog ap Dwyfnerth Sources:

   1. Title: Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry; Thomas Allen Glenn {1892}
      Page: 24
   2. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 12 
0645 Dwyfnerth ap MAdog Madogion Sources:

   1. Title: Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry; Thomas Allen Glenn {1892}
      Page: 24
   2. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 12 
0600 Madog Madogion ap Mechydd Sources:

   1. Title: Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry; Thomas Allen Glenn {1892}
      Page: 24
   2. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 12, adds another generation Mechydd ap Sandde in at this point 
Mechydd ap Sandde Sources:

   1. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: p.12 
0562 Sandde Bryd Angel ap Llywarch Hen Sources:

   1. Repository:

      Title: David Nash Ford, Early British Kingdoms: Geneaologies: North British Royal Pedigree: Bryneich, Rheged, Ebrauc, Elmet & th
      Note:


      Source Media Type: Book
   2. Title: Reifsnyder-Gillam Ancestry; Thomas Allen Glenn {1892}
      Page: 24
   3. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 12 
Llywarch Hen ab Elidir Lydanwyn Brenin Deau Rheged 0560 Dwg ap Llywarch Hen 0555 Gwen ap Llywarch Hen 0556 Pill ap Llywarch Hen 0557 Llawr ap Llywarch Hen 0558 Mechydd ap Llywarch Hen 0559 Maen ap Llywarch Hen 0561 Nefydd ap Llywarch Hen 0563 Selyf ap Llywarch Hen 0564 Dilig ap Llywarch Hen 0565 Lliwer ap Llywarch Hen 0566 Deigr ap Llywarch Hen 0567 Rhud ap Llywarch Hen 0568 Madog ap Llywarch Hen 0569 Medel ap Llywarch Hen 0570 Heilin ap Llywarch Hen 0571 Gwell ap Llywarch Hen 0572 Sawyl ap Llywarch Hen 0573 Llorien ap Llywarch Hen 0574 Ceny ap Llywarch Hen 0575 Llynghedwy ap Llywarch Hen 0576 Cynllwg ap Llywarch Hen 0577 Llwewnydd ap Llywarch Hen 0577 Gorwynion ap Llywarch Hen 0579 Rhiell ferch Llywarch Hen 0580 Ceneau ap Llywarch Hen 0581 Cynddylan ap Llywarch Hen 0582 Talan ap Llywarch Hen 0583 Cynfarch ap Llywarch Hen 0584 Rheged ap Llywarch Hen 0585 Grendwal ap Llywarch Hen 0586 Gwawr ap Llywarch Hen 0587 Mabon ap Llywarch Hen 0588 Alarch ap Llywarch Hen 0589 Bryw ap Llywarch Hen 0591 Urien ap Llywarch Hen 0592 Ysgwn ap Llywarch Hen 0593 Ceinfrom ferch Llywarch Hen 0594 Ragaw ferch Llywarch Hen 0595 Ceindreg ferch Llywarch Hen 0590 Brwyn ap Llywarch Hen 0596 Gwladys ferch Llywarch Hen 0462 - 0560 Elidyr Llydenwyn ap Meirchion Gul 98 98 Sources:

   1. Repository:

      Title: Bonedd Gwyr Y Gogledd - Dark Age Northern Celtic Royalty
      Publication: (Peniarth MS 45)
      Note:
      Source Media Type: Book
   2. Repository:

      Title: David Nash Ford, Early British Kingdoms: Geneaologies: North British Royal Pedigree: Bryneich, Rheged, Ebrauc, Elmet & th
      Note:


      Source Media Type: Book
   3. Repository:

      Title: Dictionary of National Biography
      Author: Ed by Sir Leslie S
      Publication: George Smith, Oxford Press, Vols 1-21 (Orignially published 1885-90)
      Page: XII:5
   4. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 9 
0467 Gwawr ferch Brychan Brycheiniog Tywysoges Brycheiniog 0438 - 0535 Meirchion Gul ap Gwrast Lledlwn 97 97 0440 Essylt ferch Culwynedd 0460 Cynfarch Oer ap Meirchion 0464 Idno ap Meirchion Gul 0466 Vryen ap Meirchion Gul 0422 - 0490 Gwrast Lledlwn ap Ceneu 68 68 0440 Masgwid Gloff ap Gwrast Lledlwn 0382 - 0450 Ceneu ap Coel Hen St Cenue 68 68 0420 Mor ap Ceneu 0424 Maeswig Gloff ap Ceneu 0415 Culwynedd Brychan Brycheiniog ab Anlach 0415 - 0467 Prawst ferch Tudwal 52 52 0437 Meleri ferch Brychan Brycheiniog 0438 Gwelfyl ferch Brychan Brycheiniog 0440 Gwenllian ferch Brychan Brycheiniog 0442 - 0495 Rhein Dremrudd ap Brychan 53 53 0450 Sefin ferch Brychan Brycheiniog 0458 Nyfain ferch Brychan Brycheiniog 0460 Gwladys verch Brychan Brycheiniog 0466 Gwrgon ferch Brychan Brycheiniog 0467 Marchell ferch Brycheiniog Anlach mac Coronac Sources:

   1. Repository:

      Title: David Nash Ford, Early Brittish Kingdoms: Geneaologies: Mid & Southwest Welsh British Royal Pedigree: Kings of Dyfed & Br
      Note:


      Source Media Type: Book
   2. Title: Dictionary of Welsh Biography down to 1940
      Author: John Edward Lloyd & R T Jenkins
      Publication: 1957
      Page: 56
   3. Title: Y Bywgraffiadur Cymraig Hyd 1940
      Publication: Anrhydeddus Gymdeithas y Cymmrodorion
   4. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 27 
Marchell ferch Tewdrig Tywysoes Garth Coronac mac Eurbre Wyddel Sources:

   1. Repository:

      Title: David Nash Ford, Early Brittish Kingdoms: Geneaologies: Mid & Southwest Welsh British Royal Pedigree: Kings of Dyfed & Br
      Note:


      Source Media Type: Book
   2. Repository:

      Title: History Files
      Publication:
      Note:
      Source Media Type: Book
   3. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 27
   4. Title: Dictionary of Welsh Biography down to 1940
      Author: John Edward Lloyd & R T Jenkins
      Publication: 1957
   5. Title: Y Bywgraffiadur Cymraig Hyd 1940
      Publication: Anrhydeddus Gymdeithas y Cymmrodorion 
Eurbre Wyddel mac Aed Brosc Sources:

   1. Repository:

      Title: David Nash Ford, Early British Kingdoms: Geneaologies: Mid & Southwest Welsh Royal Pedigrees, 2000
      Note:


      Source Media Type: Book
   2. Repository:

      Title: History Files
      Publication:
      Note:
      Source Media Type: Book
   3. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 27 
Aed Brosc mac Corath Tryffin Farfog mac Aed Brosc Corath ab Eochaid Allmuir Sources:

   1. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: Dyfed p.20 
Eochaid Allmuir of the Deisi Sources:

   1. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: Dyfed p.20 
Tewdrig ap Teithfallt Meurig ap Tewdrig Teithfallt ap Teithrin Sources:

   1. Title: De Situ Brecheniauc 10
   2. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 27 
Teithrin ap Tathal Sources:

   1. Title: De Situ Brecheniauc 10
   2. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 27 
Tathal ab Anhun Dunawd Sources:

   1. Title: De Situ Brecheniauc 10
   2. Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400
      Author: Peter Clement Bartrum
      Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980
      Page: 27 
0382 - 0410 Ednyfed ab Anhun Dunawd 28 28 0355 Anhun Dunawd ap Macsen Wledig 1047 Cadwgon Nannau ap Bleddyn 1050 Madog ap Bleddyn 1048 Rhirid ap Bleddyn 1045 Iorwerth ap Bleddyn 1030 Eva ferch Bleddyn D. 0489 Muiredach mac Eogain From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Muiredach mac Eógain (died circa 489) was a King of Ailech and head of the Cenél nEógain branch of the northern Uí Néill. He was the son of the founder of this dynasty Eógan mac Néill (died 465).[1]

There is no mention of him in the Irish annals but the Laud Synchronisms give him a reign of 24 years as King of Ailech giving him an approximate reign of 465-489. He married Erca, daughter of Loarn mac Eirc of Dál Riata who was mother of his son Muirchertach mac Muiredaig (died 532), high king of Ireland, also known as Muirchertach mac Ercae and founder of the Cenél maic Ercae branch.[2] Other sons included: Feradach, founder of the Cenél Feradaig branch; Moen, founder of the Cenél Moen branch; and Tigernach, founder of the Cenel Tigernaig branch.

Notes

   1. ^ T.M. Charles-Edwards, Early Christian Ireland, Appendix V
   2. ^ Geoffrey Keating, History of Ireland, Book II, pg.49

References

    * Charles-Edwards, T. M. (2000), Early Christian Ireland, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-36395-0
    * Laud Synchronisms at CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts at University College Cork
    * Geoffrey Keating, History of Ireland at CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts at University College Cork

0765 Caenawg Gawr ap Tegonwy 1067 Hunydd verch Bleddyn 1056 Gwenllian verch Bleddyn 1065 Mael ap Bleddyn D. 1021 Maclmuir ingen Olafr of Dublin Sgaile Balbh Lochlin of Denmark Harold Olafsson 1000 Maelcorcre ingen Dunlaing O'Muirdag Donncuan ua Tuathail 0935 - 1014 Dunlaing O'Toole 79 79 0440 Llyr Mereni 0400 Tidlet Sources:

   1. Page: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was
      Note:
      Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=3997&pid=-1278009088 
0430 Gwen ferch Cunedda 0452 Ygerna verch Amlawdd 0466 Anna Morgawse Verch Gwyrlys 0470 Morgan Le Fay Morgan Le Fay
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=847d0fd1-7371-4f5a-a279-962f6f544ed0&tid=3997&pid=-1166343287
0431 - 0471 Gorlois Cernyw 40 40 0472 Arthur Pendragon 0410 Uther Pendragon Uther Pendragon
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=0962de6b-d016-4169-958f-77ded47a1191&tid=3997&pid=-1166469751
0157 Saraid 0216 Daire Mac Cormac 0218 Ceallach Mac Cormac 0222 Muireadach Mac Cormac 0225 Moghruith Mac Cormac 0226 Ailbhe Gruadbrecc ingen Cormac 0232 Aongus Mac Cormac 0170 Cathair ap Mar 0178 Maire verch Morgan 0148 Mar of Cymru 0150 Morgan of Cymru 0130 Conann Cualann na hEireann 0260 Eochu na Tara 0423 Maeldaf ap Dylan Draws