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Family Subtree Diagram : ..Humphrey de Bohun (1220)X

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# Note: Page: 1

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tamer&id=I5276
0951 - 1024 Turchetil de Harcourt 73 73 Turchetil, Sire de Harcourt, Normandy; fl. 1024; presumably kin of [English Harcourt descendants]. [Burke's peerage]

Turchetil de HARCOURT, Seigneur de Turqueville [Ref: Turton (prob using Burke's)]

Turketil de TURQUEVILLE [Ref: Watney p99]


    Turquetil Seigneur de TURQUETIL et de TANQUERAYE. His name has been spelt Turchil, Turketil, Turkel, Turkeul, Turquetal, Torkel, Torketil, Torchetil, Thorkil, Thorkel, Thurkild, Turquetil, Thorchetil, etc. It is a Danish name meaning Thor's Kettle or Cauldron. Turchetil de Neufmarche was his namesake. Turchetil III Baron De Tourville, Seigneur de Tourville and de Tanqueray.


    Turquetil, seigneur de Turqueville, and de Tanqueraye, about 1001, appears in several charters concerning the abbeys of Fecamp and Bernay. He was lord of Neufmarche-en-Lions, governor of the boy duke, William... Turquetil was the second son of Torf, the son of Bernard the Dane... Turquetil, Turqueville or Tanqueraye, de Neufmarche, second son. died about 1036. He married Anceline, sister of Turstain of Montfort-sur-Risle.


    Research note: can Turqueville also be Torville? Watney lists his father as Torf "the Rich" de HARCOURT, Seigneur de Torville & states he built the castle of Torville in 955. McBride shows Tourville. Is this French vs English for the same placename?

    death: was treacherously assassinated between 1035 and 1040 by hirelings of Raoul de Gace... Murdered along with three other governor's of the young William future King of England. [Ref: McBride] (I show 1027, unfortunately I didn't identify the source, but it was apparently more solid than McBride or I would have replaced it as per McBride).

0860 - 0955 Bernard Harcourt 95 95 # Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 1

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tamer&id=I12709
0965 - 0997 Lesseline d'Harcourt 32 32 1025 - 1086 Aeldgyth of Mercia 61 61 1154 - 1201 Margaret of Huntington Dunkeld 47 47 1035 - 1080 Osbern Fitzrichard 45 45 A Domesday tenant who lived until the time of Henry I when he made a grant of land to Worcester Priory. Sheriff of Hereford, 1060.
1079 Nesta verch Osborn (le Scrope) 1000 - 1063 Gruffudd ap Llewellen 63 63 ("Griffith son of Llywelyn") was the ruler of all Wales from 1055 until his death, one of very few able to make this boast. He was the son of Llywelyn ap Seisyll and a descendant of Rhodri the Great. On the death of Iago ab Idwal in 1039, Gruffydd unexpectedly seized control of Gwynedd, and successfully waged war with Mercia, then attacked the neighbouring principality of Deheubarth. By 1044, he had conquered Deheubarth, but lost it again in 1047. Allying himself with the Mercians, he proceeded to gain considerable ground along what is now the English border, and in 1055 he sacked Hereford. Deheubarth came back within his power in the same year, and he claimed sovereignty over the whole of Wales - a claim which was recognised by the English. Gruffydd reached an agreement with Edward the Confessor, but was less successful in holding off the incursions of Harold Godwinson. His own men deserted him, and he was murdered by them and his territory broken up among several successors.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

GRUFFYDH AP LLEWELYN who succeeded Iago or Jago ap Edwal as Prince of North Wales 1037 and slew and succeeded Howel ap Edwin as Prince of South Wales 1043; at last slain by some of his intimates whom Harald, son of Earl Goodwin, had hired in 1065.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 185)
D. 1060 Billeheude de St. Sauveur  [Pullen010502.FTW]

Excerpted from Les Seigneurs de Bohon by Jean LeMelletier, Coutances:
Arnaud-Bellee, 1978: Billeheude is sometimes considered the daughter of a certain Richard de Billeheust or Richard de Saint Sauveur. In the family we find a Bileud or Bilelde, but at a later date she is considered the daughter of Neel II of Saint Saveur, one of the principal barons who revolted against William the Bastard during his youth.

Sources:

   1. Abbrev: Pullen010502.FTW
      Title: Pullen010502.FTW
      Note:
      Call number:
      Text: Date of Import: Jan 5, 2002
   2. Abbrev: Les Seigneurs de Bohun
      Title: Jean LeMelletier, Les Seigneurs de Bohun (Coutances, Arnaud-Bellee, 1978)8.
      Note:
      Call number: CS 439 D416L45 1978

      UCLA Research Library 
0935 Richard de Meri founded churches in Sainte Come du Mont & de Meautis in 950 Richard de Bohun Enjuger de Bohun Adela de Bohun 1226 - 1274 John de Verdon 48 48 # Note: John de Verdun, b. c 1226, d. 21 Oct 1274, son of Theobald le Boteler and Rohese de Verdun. [Magna Charta Sureties]
# Note:
# Note: Tenant-in-chief in Ireland.
# Note:
# Note: ------------------------------------
# Note:

    JOHN DE VERDUN, 2nd son of Theobald BUTLER, or LE BOTILLER (who died 19 July 1230, in Poitou), being 1st son by his 2nd wife, Rohese,[a] daughter and heir of Nicholas DE VERDUN, of Alton, Staffs, &c., was born about 1226. In May--June 1244 he was to be given his wife's share of the lands of her grandfather, Walter de Lacy, Lord of Meath; and on 3 May 1247 he was to have seizin of his mother's lands. He was granted protection, May 1248, to go to Ireland, which he visited many times during his life; was given quittance of common summons in many counties, during 1254-72, and was appointed one of the Justices in eyre for cos. Salop, Stafford, Warwick, Leicester and Lincoln, December 1259. He had further protections to go to Gascony, May 1253, and for service in Wales, August 1257, where he was Constable of the army which mustered at Chester; was ordered to defend the Marches against the Welsh in January 1259/60; and was summoned to London to aid the King, April 1260, and to Windsor, for the same reason, October 1263. Later in that year he was among the Royalists who promised to observe the award of Louis of France touching the Provisions of Oxford. During the conflict between Simon de Montfort and the Crown John followed the King. In August 1265, after the Royal victory at Evesham, he was Keeper of Odiharn Castle, Hants; in October following he wrote, with others, to report to the King the surrender of London; and in February 1265/6 he was appointed to protect Worcestershire from the attacks of the rebels in Kenilworth Castle. In August 1270 he accompanied the Lord Edward on his Crusade; and witnessed a charter granted by him in Sicily, 15 January 1270/1. He established the Franciscan priory at Dundalk, co. Louth.

# Note:

    He married, 1stly, before 14 May 1244, Margery, 1st daughter of Gilbert DE LACY, of Ewyas Lacy, co. Hereford, by Isabel, daughter of Hugh (LE BIGOD), EARL OF NORFOLK, which Gilbert (who died v.p. between 12 August and 25 December 1230) was son and heir ap. of Walter de Lacy, Lord of Meath (who died s.p.m.s. shortly before 24 February 1240/1), to whom Margery was coheir. He married, 2ndly, before 1267, Eleanor (f). He is said to have died 21 October 1274. His widow was living, 10 June 1278. [Complete Peerage XII/2:246-8, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

# Note:

    [a] Besides Alton her great inheritance in England and Ireland included Brandon Castle, co. Warwick, Belton, co. Leicester, and Farnham Royal, Bucks, which manor was held by the service of finding a glove for the King's hand on the day of his Coronation.

# Note:

    (f) Presumably his son Humphrey, b. on the vigil of Pentecost 1267, was by the 2nd wife. Nothing is known of Eleanor's parentage but she may have been a Bohun. A seal, said to be hers, bears the Bohun and Verdun arms and the name of her son, Humphrey, may be significant.

Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 13-4

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: IX:403 , Page: XII/2:246-8

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 40-29, Page: 70-30
1092 - 1143 Miles de Pietres de Gloucester 51 51 1090 - 1143 Sybil de Neufmarche 53 53 Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999 1136 - 1220 Lucy de Pitres 84 84 1123 Roger FitzMiles Henry FitzMiles de Cloucester 1065 - 1129 Walter de Pitres 64 64 1069 Berthe of Gloucester 1043 - 1100 Roger de Pitres 57 57 1045 Eunice de Baalun 1070 - 1093 Bernard de Neufmarche 23 23 # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 177-3
1018 Geoffrey de Neufmarche # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 177-3
1030 Ada de Hugleville # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 177-3
0960 Poppa of Envermeu Papia of England 0988 Thurcytel de Neufmarche 0953 Adeline de Montfort 1062 Hugh de Montford Anceline de Bastembourg de Bertrand 1070 - 1131 Humphrey de Bohun 61 61 # Note:

    [Pullen010502.FTW]

    Excerpted from Les Seigneurs de Bohon by Jean LeMelletier, Coutances:
    Arnaud-Bellee, 1978: Humphrey married Maud (Mathilda or Mahaut, who died 1142), daughter of Edward de Salisbury, between 1087 and 1100. The dowry gave him important estates in the Wiltshire area and the barony of Trowbridge. This was the first of a series of marriages which benefitted the Bohons. They had a daughter, Maud, and a son, Humphrey III.

---

# Note:

    Humphrey de Bohun, surnamed "the Great," by command of king William Rufus, m. Maud, dau. of Edward de Saresbury (progenitor of the ancient Earls of Salisbury), by whom he acquired large estates in the co. of Wilts, and had issue, Maud, and his successor, Humphrey III de Bohun. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 57, Bohun, Earls of Hereford, Earls of Essex, Earls of Northampton, and High Constables of England]


--------------------------


Les Seigneurs de Bohon
(The Noblemen of Bohun)

The following material is excerpted from Les Seigneurs de Bohon by Jean LeMelletier, Coutances: Arnaud-Bellee, 1978. This was translated from French to English by a friend. The book was found at UCLA's Research Library as CS 439 D416L45 1978.

Humphrey II



    The sources for this branch of the Bohons, earls of Hereford, Essex, and Northampton, are all English. The name Bohon was changed to Boun, Boon, Bowne, etc. It was later considered to signify master or boss. Humfridus, Onfroi, and Honfroy are translated as Humphrey.


The frequent repetition of the first name Humphrey causes a lot of confusion. The English begin their line with the first Humphrey born in Great Britain, who is our Humphrey II.



    Humphrey II, known as Humphrey the Magnificent or Humphrey the Great, benefitted from the favor of King William Rufus (son of William the Conqueror). His signature is on a number of papers of Henry I. Thus we can follow him around England (1103-1109), then in Normandy at Avranches (1113) and Rouen (1119), then in England (1121), back to Rouen (1125), and back to England (1128).




    Humphrey II gave the church of Bishop Street in Salisbury (Wiltshire) to the Lewes Abbey (next to Newhaven) and the church of Cheleworth to the St. Dennis priory (Southampton). He was a witness at the founding of Savigney Abbey by Ralph de Fougeres.




    Humphrey married Maud (Mathilda or Mahaut, who died 1142), daughter of Edward de Salisbury, between 1087 and 1100. The dowry gave him important estates in the Wiltshire area and the barony of Trowbridge. This was the first of a series of marriages which benefitted the Bohons. They had a daughter, Maud, and a son, Humphrey III. Humphrey II died around 1129.




    Edward de Salisbury or Saresbury, lord of Chittern (Wiltshire), is often considered like a son of William d'Evreux, earl of Rosmare or Roumare and companion of William the Conqueror. He possessed very important lands at Salisbury and other areas. He wore the banner of Henry I at the Battle of Bremule where he fought against King Louis VI of France (20 August 1119). Besides his daughter Maud, he had a son, Walter (died 1147). Edward died 1130.



Maud de Bohun 1109 - 1187 Humphrey de Bohun 78 78 # Note:

    Humphrey de Bohun was steward and sewer to King Henry I. This feudal lord m. Margery, dau. of Milo de Gloucester, Earl of Hereford, Lord High Constable of England, and sister and co-heiress of Mable, last Earl of Hereford of that family. At the instigation of which Milo, he espoused the cause of the Empress Maud (Matilda) and her son against King Stephen, and so faithfully maintained his allegiance that the empress, by her especial charter, granted him the office of steward and sewer, both in Normandy and England. In the 20th Henry II, this Humphrey accompanied Richard de Lacy (justice of England) into Scotland with a powerful army to waste that country; and was one of the witnesses to the accord made by William, King of Scots, and King Henry as to the subjection of that kingdom to the crown of England. He d. 6 April 1187, and was survived by his son, Henry de Bohun, 1st Earl of Hereford. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 57, Bohun, Earls of Hereford, Earls of Essex, Earls of Northampton, and High Constables of England]

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 193-5
1113 - 1170 John d'Eu 57 57 Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 139-26

---

Carl Boyer writes: "King Stephen gave him custory of the castle of Tickhill. However, he was taken prisoner at the battle of Lincoln on 2 Feb. 1140/1, and the castle was not returned to him when his other lands were restored. He attended the Council of Claredon in Jan. 1163/4.

"He became a monk at Fourcarmont, where he was buried."
1242 Eleanor de Bohun He [John de Verdun] married, 2ndly, before 1267, Eleanor (f). He is said to have died 21 October 1274. His widow was living, 10 June 1278. [Complete Peerage XII/2:246-8, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]


    (f) Presumably his son Humphrey, b. on the vigil of Pentecost 1267, was by the 2nd wife. Nothing is known of Eleanor's parentage but she may have been a Bohun. A seal, said to be hers, bears the Bohun and Verdun arms and the name of her son, Humphrey, may be significant.


-------------------------------------------------------

From: Douglas Richardson (royalancestry@msn.com)
Subject: Re: Eleanor de Verdun, and her daughter, Maud, wife of John de Grey, of Wilton
Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
Date: 2002-01-16 07:08:57 PST

Dear Newsgroup ~



    Since making my post on Eleanor (de Bohun) de Verdun yesterday, I've checked my files and found further confirmation which I believe conclusively proves that Eleanor was the daughter of Humphrey de Bohun (died 1275), Earl of Hereford and Essex. The evidence consists of two separate cases of consanguinity among descendants of Eleanor (de Bohun) de Verdun where they intermarried with their Bohun related kinfolk.




    In the first instance, my notes record that there was a papal dispensation recorded in 1334, for the marriage of Maud de Grey and John de Lisle, 2nd Lord Lisle, of Rougement. As I recall, this dispensation is mentioned by Complete Peerage sub Lisle. Maud and John were stated to be related in the 4th degree in their petition for a dispensation (i.e., third cousins to each other). Maud de Grey was great-granddaughter of Eleanor (de Bohun) de Verdun. John de Lisle was great-grandson of Alice (de Bohun) de Tony. If the degree of kinship was correctly stated in the papal registers, it would appear that Maud's ancestress, Eleanor de Bohun, and John's ancestress, Alice de Bohun, were sisters. Since Alice is known to have been a daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex (died 1275), this in turn tells us that Eleanor was daughter of the same Humphrey de Bohun.




    In the second instance, my notes record there was a papal inquiry in 1334 regarding the marriage of Margaret Basset and John de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex. Margaret Basset was a great-granddaughter of Eleanor (de Bohun) de Verdun. Margaret and her husband, John, were closely related, but my notes don't tell how closely related the two parties were, if the degree of kinship was stated. To resolve the question of kinship, the Pope summoned a host of relatives of the young couple. Among those summoned were several of Margaret Basset's Grey relatives as well as Alice de Tony, widow of Walter de Beauchamp, and her daughter and son-in-law, Margaret and Robert de Lisle. The people required to give testimony presumably all had a tie to the Bohun family. If nothing else, this document provides added evidence that the Greys, Tonys, Beauchamps and Lisles all share a common descent from the Bohun family.


Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

E-mail: royalancestry@msn.com

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/2:248 (f)
Text: Eleanor, possibly a Bohun

Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
Page: Douglas Richardson, 20 Feb 2002
Text: Confirms Humphrey de Bohun as father.

Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
Page: John Ravilious (Therav3), 15 Jan 2002
Text: Humphrey de Bohun, by his 2nd wife Maud de Avenbury.Text: actually states "aft 1255", but I am adjusting to agree with 1st wife's death.
1208 - 1275 Humphrey de Bohun 67 67 Humphrey de Bohun V, born 1208, died 24 Sep 1275, 2nd Earl of Hereford and Essex, Constable of England; married (1) Maud d'Eu, died 14 Aug 1241, daughter of Raoul I de Lusignan and Alice d'Eu. [Magna Charta Sureties]

-----------------------------------

    Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, and possessing that honour of Essex through his mother, was created Earl of that county by King Henry III, at whose marriage his lordship performed the office of marshal in the king's house, and in three years afterwards, anno 1239, was one of the godfathers at the font for Edward, eldest son of the king, there being no less than nine sponsors on the occasion, viz., five temporal and four spiritual lords. He was Lord High Constable of England. In 1250, he took up the cross and proceeded to the Holy Land. In three years afterwards, his lordship was present with other peers when that formal curse was denounced in Westminster Hall with bell, book, and candle, against the violators of Magna Carta; in which year he founded the church of the Friars Augustines, in Broad-street, within the city of London. In the great contest between the king and his barons, this nobleman fought for the latter at Evesham, where he was taken prisoner, but he did not long continue in bondage for we find him soon after again in favour and receiving new grants from the crown. His lordship d. 1275, having m. 1st, Maud, dau. of Ralph, Count d'Eu, by Yolande, his wife, dau. of Robert, Count de Dreux, Earl of Ewe, and had issue, Humphrey, Maud, Alice, and ---, m. to --- Quincy. Humphrey, Earl of Hereford and Essex, d. 1275, and was s. by his grandson, Humphrey de Bohun. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 57, Bohun, Earls of Hereford, Earls of Essex, Earls of Northampton, and High Constables of England]


Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 18-2, 101A-2
1208 - 1241 Maud de Lusignan 33 33 # Note: Maud d'Eu, died 14 Aug 1241, daughter of Raoul I de Lusignan and Alice d'Eu. [Magna Charta Sureties]
# Note:
Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 18-2, 101A-2
1220 - 1265 Humphrey de Bohun 45 45 1241 - 1264 Alice de Bohun 23 23 1176 - 1220 Henry de Bohun 44 44 important participant in estalishment of the Magna Carta

# Note:

    Henry de Bohun, Magna Charta Surety 1215, son of Humphrey de Bohun IV and Margaret de Huntingdon, born 1176, died 1 Jun 1220, sheriff of Kent, 1st Earl of Hereford 1200-1290, hereditary Constable of England; married Maud Fitz Geoffrey, died 1236, Countess of Essex, daughter of Geoffrey Fitz Piers, died 1213, Earl of Essex, and Beatrix de Say, daughter of William de Say. [Magna Charta Sureties]

Note: It is not my error in typing (but probably MCS's); Henry appears to have been Earl of Hereford until 1290, which was 70 years after his death!
---------------------------------------------------------

# Note:

    Henry de Bohun, who in reality was the 1st Earl of Hereford of this family, being so created by charter of King John, dated 28 April, 1199, but the constableship he inherited from his father. His lordship, taking part with the barons against King John, had his lands sequestered, but they were restored at the signing of Magna Carta, at Runnymede, the earl being one of the twenty-five lords appointed there to enforce the observance of the celebrated charters. His lordship was subsequently excommunicated by the pope and he became a prisoner at the battle of Lincoln in the 1st year of Henry III [1216-17]. He m. Maud, dau. of Geoffrey FitzPiers, Earl of Essex, and eventually heiress of her brother, William de Mandeville, last Earl of Essex of that family, by whom he acquired the honour of Essex and other extensive lordships, ---and had issue, Henry, d. young, Humphrey, and Ralph, and a dau. Margery, who m. Waleran, Earl of Warwick. His lordship d. 1 January 1220 and was s. by his son, Humphrey de Bohun. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 57, Bohun, Earls of Hereford, Earls of Essex, Earls of Northampton, and High Constables of England]

Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 18-1, 160-4

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 1378

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 97-27
1177 - 1236 Maud FitzGeoffrey 59 59 # Note:

Maud Fitz Geoffrey, died 1236, Countess of Essex, daughter of Geoffrey Fitz Piers, died 1213, Earl of Essex, and Beatrix de Say, daughter of William de Say. [Magna Charta Sureties]

-----------------------

    Maud, dau. of Geoffrey Fitz-Piers, Earl of Essex, and eventually heiress of her brother, William de Mandeville, last Earl of Essex of that family. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 57, Bohun, Earls of Hereford, Earls of Essex, Earls of Northampton, and High Constables of England]

Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 18-1, 160-4
1126 Margaret de Gloucester 1143 - 1182 Humphrey de Bohun 39 39 # Note:

    Humphrey de Bohun was Earl of Hereford and Constable of England in right of his mother, if the Chronicles of Llanthony be correct. His lordship m. Margaret of Scotland, dau. of Henry, Earl of Huntingdon, sister of William, King of Scots, and widow of Conan le Petit, Earl of Brittany and Richmond, and was s. by his son, Henry de Bohun, 1st Earl of Hereford. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 57, Bohun, Earls of Hereford, Earls of Essex, Earls of Northampton, and High Constables of England]

Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 18-1

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 2944

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 97-26

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: X:793
1123 Richard de Bohun 0900 Ralph de Mary 0900 Mont Haguez 0870 Mont Haguez 1011 Ada de Hugleville 1162 - 1213 Geoffrey de Mandeville FitzPiers 51 51 # Note:

    Upon the decease of William de Mandeville, 3rd Earl of Essex, much dispute arose regarding the inheritance: Beatrix, his aunt and heir, in the first place, preferring her claim, sent Geoffrey de Say, her younger son, to transact the business for the livery thereof, but Geoffrey FitzPiers insisted upon the right of Beatrix, his wife. Nevertheless, Geoffrey de Say, in consideration of 7,000 marks promised to be paid on a certain day, obtained an instrument in right of his mother, under the king's seal, for the whole of the barony, but the said Geoffrey de Say, making default of payment, this Geoffrey FitzPiers, being a man of great wealth and reputation, made representation that the barony was the right of his wife and, promising to pay the money, obtained livery thereof and procured the king's confirmation of his title. One of the earliest acts of this feudal lord was to dispossess the monks of Walden of certain lands which they had derived from his predecessors, a proceeding followed by a long controversy, which, after being referred to the Pope and the King, was finally compromised. Upon the removal of Hubert, Archbishop of Canterbury, from the office of Justice of England by Richard I, this Geoffrey was appointed to succeed him, and at the coronation of King John, 26 June, 1199, he was girt with the sword as Earl of Essex, and then served at the king's table. Being nominated patron of the monastery at Walden, he appears soon after to have been received with great ceremony by the monks and perfectly reconciled to those holy fathers. In the 7th King John, he had a grant of the castle and honour of Berkhamstead, with the knights' fees thereunto belonging to hold to him and the heirs of his body, by Aveline, his 2nd wife. His lordship m. 1st, Beatrix de Say, by whom he had issue, Geoffrey, William, Henry, all of whom assumed the name of Mandeville, and Maud, m. to Robert de Bohun. He m. 2ndly, Aveline ---, and had an only son, John FitzPiers, Lord of Berkhamstead. His lordship, whom Matthew Paris characterizes as "ruling the reins of government so that after his death the realm was like a ship in a tempest without a pilot," d. 2 October, 1213, and was s. by his eldest son, Geoffrey de Mandeville. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 353, Mandeville, Earls of Essex]

----------

    GEOFFREY FITZ PETER (d. 1213), earl of Essex and chief justiciar of England, was a sheriff, a justice itinerant and a justice of the forest under Henry II. During Richard's absence on crusade he was one of the five justices of the king's court who stood next in authority to the regent, Longchamp. In 1190 Fitz Peter succeeded to the earldom of Essex, in the right of his wife, who was descended from the famous Geoffrey de Mandeville. In attempting to asset his hereditary rights over  Walden priory Fitz Peter came into conflict with Longchamp, and revenged himself by joining in the baronial agitation through which the regent was expelled from his office. Though refusing to give him formal investiture of the Essex earldom, Richard appointed him justiciar in succession to Hubert Walter (1198). Fitz Peter continued Walter's policy of encouraging foreign trade and the development of the towns; many of the latter received, during his administration, charters of self-government. He was continued in his office by John, who found him an able instrument of extortion. He profited to no small extent by the spoliation of church lands in the period of the interdict. But he was not altogether trusted by the king. The contemporary "Historie des ducs" described Fitz Peter as living in constant dread of disgrace and confiscation. In the last years of his life he endeavoured to act as a mediator between the king and the opposition. It was by his mouth that the king promised to the nation the laws of Henry I. (at the council of St. Albans, Aug. 4, 1213). But Fitz Peter died a few weeks later (Oct. 2). Fitz Peter was neither a far-sighted nor a disinterested statesman; but he was the ablest pupil of Hubert Walter, and maintained the traditions of the great bureaucracy which the first and second Henries had founded.

Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 4-3, 18-1, 153a-4, 160-3

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 246c-27
Text: adult 1184

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: IX:420
1186 William de Mandeville 1180 - 1246 Alice d' Eu 66 66 Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 18-2, 101A-2

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 123-28
Complete Peerage vol.V,pp.160-166
1155 - 1182 Henry d' Eu 27 27 Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 123-27

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/1:500 (g)

---

Carl Boyer writes: "A minor when his father died, he was for some years in the custody of the Earl of Arundel. In 1173, he supported the young King Henry."
1145 - 1188 Alice d' Aubigny 43 43 1056 Simon Le Scrope 1163 Maud Plantagenet 0952 - 0979 Tourude de Harcourt 27 27 # Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 100, 13

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tamer&id=I6122
0992 - 1058 Leceline de Harcourt 66 66 1085 Maud Fitzwalter 0958 - 1026 Richard Normandy 68 68 1093 - 1142 Mahaut de Evereux 49 49 # Note:

    [Pullen010502.FTW]

    Excerpted from Les Seigneurs de Bohon by Jean LeMelletier, Coutances:
    Arnaud-Bellee, 1978: Humphrey married Maud (Mathilda or Mahaut, who died 1142), daughter of Edward de Salisbury, between 1087 and 1100. The dowry gave him important estates in the Wiltshire area and the barony of Trowbridge. This was the first of a series of marriages which benefitted the Bohons. They had a daughter, Maud, and a son, Humphrey III.

1008 Richard de Hugleville 1202 Ralph de Bohun 1200 Saveric Fitzgeoffrey 1057 - 1153 Nesta verch Gruffudd 96 96 0982 Angharad verch Maredudd ANGHARAD VERCH MEREDITH, Princess of Powys, who married, first, Llewelyn ap Sitsyllt, Prince of Powys, in right of his wife, and of North and South Wales, by usurpation; assumed the Sovereignty of Wales about 1013 and died 1021. Anderson says he succeeded Aedan ap Blegorad as Prince of North Wales 1015, then Prince of South Wales, and was slain 1021. She married, second, Confyn ap Gwerystan, a noble of Powys, who became Prince of Powys in right of his wife.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 182)
0980 - 1023 Llywelyn ap Seisyllt 43 43 Nothing is known about Llywelyn's father Seisyll, who may not have been of royal blood, though Llywelyn's mother Angharad was the daughter of Maredydd ab Owain, who ruled much of both nothern and southern Wales for a period.

Llywelyn won control of Gwynedd in 1018 when he defeated Aeddan ap Blegywryd in battle, killing him and his four sons. He later gained control of Deheubarth, defeating Rhain, an Irish pretender who claimed to be the son of Maredydd ab Owain, at Abergwili in 1022. According to the annals in Brut y Tywysogion, his reign was a period of prosperity, but it was cut short by his premature death in 1023.

His son, Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, though still a youth when his father died, was later able to gain control of almost the whole of Wales.
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

LLEWELYN AP SITSYLHT who succeeded Aedan ap Blegorad as Prince of North Wales 1015, he being then Prince of South Wales; slain 1021; first husband of Anghared, daughter and sole heiress of Meredith ap Owen, Prince of North Wales (ped. 156). She married, second, Confyn, Prince of Powys in right of his wife.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 185)
Gwenta verch Gruffydd 1055 Maredudd ap Gruffydd 1057 Idwal ap Gruffydd 0938 Seisyll ap Ednywain 0940 Prawst verch Elise 0984 Cynan ap Seisyllt 0913 Endowain ap Einydd Einydd Bach Pyll ap Sandde Sandde ap Gwyddno Gwyddno ap Geraint D. 0710 Geraint of Dumnonia Geraint (d. 710 CE; known in Latin as Gerontius) was a King of Dumnonia who ruled in the early eighth century. During his reign, it is believed that Dumnonia came repeatedly into conflict with neighbouring Anglo-Saxon Wessex. Geraint was the last recorded king of a unified Dumnonia, and was called King of the Welsh by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Subsequent kings of Dumnonia (e.g. Doniert, Huwell) reigned over a reducing area that eventually encompassed only a part of Cornwall.

A long and rather acrimonious letter survives addressed to him from Aldhelm on the Easter Problem and the shape of the tonsure. It is clear from this letter that in the later seventh century the Brythons in Cornwall and Devon still observed Easter on the dates that the Celtic church had calculated, at variance with Catholic practice. Geraint ultimately agreed with Aldhelm to comply with Roman practice on these points. According to Florence of Worcester, Geraint was killed after a series of battles that culminated in a victory of the West Saxons under Ine of Wessex in 710 CE. It was probably around this time that Devon was conquered by the West Saxons. After Geraint's death, however, Ine was unable to establish his authority over neighbouring Cornwall; in 722, according to the Annales Cambriae, the Cornish won a battle at Hehil, probably against Wessex.

William F. Skene and other scholars suggest Geraint of Dumnonia be identified as the warrior eulogized in the poem Battle of Llongborth, traditionally ascribed to Llywarch Hen. Other scholars associate the slain man with Geraint ab Erbin, a king said to have lived during the 5th century but of dubious historicity. Skene identifies Llongborth with the 710 battle between Geraint and Ine, and suggests Langport in Somerset as the location of the battle.
(Wikipedia)
Garannog Glewddigar Cynwas ap Rhychwin Rhychwin Farfog ap Helig Rhychwyn, the saint associated with Llanrhychwyn church, regarded by many as being the oldest in Wales.

Llanrhychwyn (which takes its name from Rhochwyn, son of Helig ap Glannog) is now a small hamlet.
(Wikipedia)
Helig ap Glanawg Helig ap Glanawg (standard modern Welsh orthography: Helig ap Glannog) was a 6th century prince who lived in North Wales.

It is said that the river Conwy once reached the sea by the Great Orme, Llandudno, and to the west lay the great cantref of Gwaelod which stretched all the way to Puffin Island, off Anglesey.

Helig ap Glanawg lived here, but in the 6th century all his land was inundated by the sea, this forming the Lavan Sands which lie between the Great Orme's Head and the Menai Straits off the north coast of Gwynedd. This has given rise to the legend of the drowned kingdom. It is said that the remains of Llys Helig, his palace, can be seen at exceptionally low tides, this being near the Conwy channel, about a mile or so off the coast at Penmaenmawr.

Since then, the story has been embroidered into various myths, such as the flood being the result of revenge after Helig ap Glanawg's daughter was unfaithful in love.

Llys Helig is mentioned in a number of old documents, some of were published after expeditions to find Llys Helig.

After the disaster both Helig and his numerous sons embraced a religious life. These sons, according to various sources, were -

Celynin, who has a church dedicated to him at Llangelynin in the Conwy valley, and there is another at Llangelynin near Llwyngwril, a few miles south of Llanaber.
Rhychwyn, the saint associated with Llanrhychwyn church.
Bodfan, to whom the church at Aber, in Gwynedd, is dedicated.
Brothen, who founded the Church at Llanfrothen
Peris, who founded the churches at Llanberis and Nant Peris.
Boda and Gwynin, who founded the church at Dwygyfylchi, near Penmaenmaw
(Wikipedia)
Celynin ap Helig Bodfan ap Helig Brothen ap Helig Peris ap Helig Boda ap Helig Gwynin ap Helig Glannog ap Gwgon ~0470 Gwgon Gleddyfrudd ap Caradoc ~0430 Caradoc Vreichvras Caradoc Vreichvras (more correctly in Welsh, Caradog Freichfras, meaning Caradoc Strong (or Stout) Arm) was a semi-legendary ancestor to the kings of Gwent living during the 5th or 6th century. He is remembered in Arthurian legend as a Knight of the Round Table as Carados Briefbras (French 'Caradog Short Arm').

Though the name "Caradoc" and its various forms were by no means uncommon during the Middle Ages, it is probable some of the Caradogs referred to in Welsh genealogies and hagiographies such the Life of St. Tatheus are the same person. Due to the name's prevalence, considerable confusion exists about Caradoc's identity, both historical and literary. He may have become confused with the British hero Caratacus (the Latin form of Caradoc), Cerdic of Wessex and any number of British history's later Caradocs. His parentage varies from text to text; he is called the son of Llyr Marini (possibly implying Llyr) several times in the Mabinogion, and a Breton legend identifies a Caradoc the Elder, furthering the obfuscation.

Caradoc appears in the Welsh Triads, where he is described as Arthur's chief elder at Celliwig in Cornwall and one of the three knights of the island of Britain; his horse is named as Luagor ("host-splitter"). His wife, Tegau Eurfon (Gold-Breast) is also celebrated in the Triads as one of the three splendid maidens at Arthur's court, and the couple's great love is called one of the three surpassing bonds of Britain. This tradition is possibly dealt with in a 12th century French romance.

In Arthurian legend, he is said to have been a member of the Round Table during Uther Pendragon's time, but he joined other kings in rebellion when Arthur took the throne. He was eventually reconciled with the young king and became one of his most trusted allies. Caradoc appears frequently in Arthurian literature, and even starred in his own romance, the Life of Caradoc included in the First Continuation of Chr├ętien de Troyes's Perceval, the Story of the Grail. The story, probably based on Celtic tradition, seems created to explain how he got his nickname 'Short Arm'. Caradoc the Elder marries the beautiful Ysave, but she is soon seduced by an enchanter named Eliavres. Eliavres casts a spell over Caradoc to make him mistake various farm animals for his wife while the wizard is busy conceiving a son. Caradoc the Elder names the son after himself, and the boy grows up to be a worthy, young squire. Caradoc the Younger goes off to King Arthur's court and is made a Knight of the Round Table like his father.

Before long, Eliavres enters the hall and asks for a beheading test (a Celtic motif also appearing in the Old Irish Bricriu's Feast and the Middle English Sir Gawain and the Green Knight). He asks for a knight to lop off his head, the only catch being that if he survives, he may take the knight's head in return. Caradoc takes up the challenge, and dutifully offers his own neck when the sorcerer magically replaces his head. Eliavres declines to kill young Caradoc, but reveals that he is his birth father.

Caradoc the Younger is understandably chagrined at the news. He embarks on a number of knightly adventures, whereupon he meets his best friend Sir Cador, travelling with his sister Guinier. Back in his kingdom, he reveals his father's cuckoldry, and Caradoc the Elder and Younger exact humiliating vengeance upon Eliavres involving various farm animals. The offender is locked away from his mistress Ysave.

All goes well until the wizard attempts to escape. When Caradoc the Younger tries to stop him, Eliavres summons a serpent that entwines itself around Caradoc's arm, crippling it and draining his life energy away. Cador and Guinier travel throughout the country trying to find how to remove the snake, and finally return with the solution. Caradoc will sit in a tub of vinegar while Guinier sits in a vat of milk with her supple breasts exposed. The serpent loaths the vinegar and leaps towards Guinier, but Cador kills it with his sword. Unfortunately he slices off Guinier's nipple in the process (it is later replaced with a magical gold one). Though Caradoc is freed from the snake, his arm is permanently damaged, leaving him with his nickname, Caradoc Short Arm. Guinier and Caradoc are married, and after a familiar fidelity test involving a drinking horn, they live happily ever after.

The tale exists in all three redactions of the First Continuation and is embedded, in abridged form, in one of the Reynard romances. Though it does not appear earlier than the last decade of the 13th century, it is most likely based on a Welsh version, allusions to which can be found in the Welsh Triads. The Triads note Caradoc's wife Tegau for her love and fidelity, and her sobriquet Eurfon (Gold-Breast) would suit Guiner from the Life of Caradoc. Additionally, there is mention of Tegau's fidelity-testing mantle; the mantle is a common substitute for the drinking horn in chastity test stories.
(Wikipedia)
~0430 Tegau Eufron Kowrda ap Caradoc Kydeboc ap Caradoc Kollen ap Caradoc 0440 Llyr Mereni 0456 Tywanwedd ferch Amlawdd 0885 - 0942 Elise ap Anarawd 57 57 ELIS who was slain with his brother Edward Foel.
(Fenwick Allied Ancestry, page 184)
0900 0936 Cyngen 1100 Hugh FitzOsborn 1010 Richard FitzScrob A Norman favorite of Edward the Confessor, who was allowed by the Godwin party to remain in England in 1053. He built Richard's Castle in County Hereford (Complete Peerage, Vol. IX, p 256).  1015 FitzWinmarch 0995 Robert FitzWinmarch 1074 Robert de Pitres 1115 Ellen de Bohun 1037 - 1113 Humphrey de Bohun 76 76 accompanying William The Conqueror/3 wifes by 1066


    The founder of this family in England was Humphrey de Bohun, kinsman and companion in arms to William the Conqueror, and was generally known as "Humphrey with the Beard." Of this Humphrey little more is ascertained than that he possessed the lordship of Taterford, in Norfolk, and was s. by his son, Humphrey de Bohun. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 57, Bohun, Earls of Hereford, Earls of Essex, Earls of Northampton, and High Constables of England]


--------------------------

The following was supplied in an e-mail to me by Lora Cline, which seems to have been copied from a Rand Corp. employee's genealogy website:

Les Seigneurs de Bohon
(The Noblemen of Bohun)

The following material is excerpted from Les Seigneurs de Bohon by Jean LeMelletier, Coutances: Arnaud-Bellee, 1978. This was translated from French to English by a friend. The book was found at UCLA's Research Library as CS 439 D416L45 1978.

Humphrey I

(Honfroy, Onfrei, Onfroi, Unfridus, Humfridus)



    Humphrey I, also called The Old, was the founder of the house of Bohon. He is mainly known as a companion of William the Conqueror at the conquest of England and as the founder of the Bohon priory. Old English books designate him Humfridus cum Barba or Humphrey with the Beard. His beard distinguished him from other Norman knights of the period because they habitually shaved. Humphrey was the godfather of William and was certainly close to him because we see the names of William, duchess Mathilde, and their children associated with Humphrey's children. The oldest mention of Humphrey that we know of is in William's journals. It confirms a donation made at the abbey of St. Trinite du Mont at Rouen by Gilbert, Osbern's vassal. William's signature is accompanied by that of Humphrey, son of Richard, listed with the rest of William's men. In 1062 we find Humphrey again with William at the Hogue de Biville, along with Roger de Montgomery and William, son of Osbern. At a meal in the middle of the road, William said they should be free like the common people of the neighboring priory of Heauville. In recounting the story, a monk said that a fellow diner criticized William's liberalism. Not taking too kindly to criticism, William threatened to strike him with a shoulder of pork. According to a paper from about 1060, the knight Humphrey, a rich and noble man, granted the priory he founded, St. Georges de Bohon, to the abbey of St. Martin of Marmoutier. Humphrey tells us with the inspiration of God and the patronage of lord earl William for the relief of my soul, and those of the late Richard of Mary, my father, and of the late Billeheude, my mother...in the octave of the Pentecost before the venerable father Geoffrey, bishop of Coutances... I protect the abbey of St. Martin, the servants Arnouf, Heribert, and Roger, and the other people whose names are inscribed here.


The authenticity of this act, of which the original documents were unfortunately destroyed, does not seem to bear to be contested.



    The latest dates proposed for the founding of the priory come from dates of estate foundings (from Martene and Miss Gantier 1068; Gerville and the Bernard abbey 1092; L. Musset between 1066 & 1087). However, the title of earl was given to William before 1066 and the founding of the priory was earlier. Originally the priory was settled by four secular canons. The act of including the priory with the abbey was precisely to entrust it with the lands of a knight. (A knight cared for and protected his lands and those who lived there from thieves, warring lords, etc.)




    In later years St. Martin became very popular. It was at Marmoutier that William himself joined the Battle Abbey, founded to commemorate the Battle of Hastings where it was fought. A document signed by Sir William, duke of the Normands, before 1066 shows that Humphrey de Bohon gave a garden from his fief (holdings) in Puchay to the nuns of St. Amand in Rouen for the repose of his soul and those of his three wives when one of his daughters became religious.




    The monastery of St. Leger in Preaux was given the deeds to Barbeville, St. Marie's Church, the town of Carentan, and the neighboring rectory. Later Humphrey bequeathed the monastery a convent that his second daughter entered. Humphrey's sons Robert and Richard agreed with his actions.


By 1066 Humphrey had been married three times, two daughters had entered the convent, and sons Robert and Richard were old enough to assume their inheritance. Humphrey was a senior citizen.

Wace cited among the soldiers of Hastings: E de Bohon the older Humphrey.



    Humphrey's name, a bit distorted, is seen on a majority of other lists of William's battle companions. As Wace's poem was written more than a hundred years after the events happened, some feel that Humphrey was not among the people at the Battle of Hastings. Taking into account the type of document (poem), it is very probable that Humphrey did participate in the battle. He was also with several neighbors of Cotentin and probably vassals, whose names were associated with his.




    On the Bayeux tapestry, in a meal scene presided over by Bishop Odo, a bearded man is sitting to William's right. It is possible that this is Humphrey de Bohon--with the Beard--who would occupy a place of honor at the table out of respect for his age.


    Ten years after Hastings, William was in England, so Queen Mathilda was left in charge of the government in Normandy. We know Humphrey was also in Normandy because of the act of Cherbourg, about 1076. Under the king's orders, he rendered justice with the monks at the Heauville priory against Bertram de Bricquebec, viscount of Cotentin, who had levied unfair taxes on his people.


    Humphrey is mentioned in the Domesday Book (a great census taken of all the lands and people in England as ordered by William, between 1080 and 1086) as a champion and defender of the throne, and as lord of Taterford in Norfolk. Much of his wealth is attributed to the goodwill of William and the spoils of the campaigns, which was not a unique situation. However, the possession of large estates and properties in England was not all fun; they were hard to protect from raiders and warring lords. Humphrey probably also benefitted from Normandy's continued growth and profits from his holdings.


Humphrey's signature is on:

A treaty at Bayeaux. The king presided over the treaty between the abbey of Mont St. Michel and William Paynel.



    Two documents of Boscherville on 30 January 1080, with the signatures of his son Richard, and William, Mathilda, and their two sons. One is the endowment of the church of St. Georges de Boscherville; the other documents a gift of St. Gervais Church and St. Portais to St. Florent de Saumur with other revenues by William de Briouze.


A document of William the Conqueror at Caen confirming the foundation of the Lessay Abbey on 14 July 1080.
Another document for the foundation of the Montebourg Abbey.



    Humphrey's decision to combine the priory with the abbey was contested by Geoffrey (son of Nervee) who reclaimed the priory. The case was settled in favor of Humphrey by a judgment of the king's court on 27 December 1080 at Cherbourg. Among the witnesses were Humphrey de Bohon, his son Richard, and Torchetil de Bohon.


Continually Humphrey added his border lands to his holdings. In answer to his request, he received a formal deed from King William at Bernouville, probably at the end of 1081.

Other religious establishments benifitted from his generosity.



    Humphrey died between 1080 and 1093. He had four sons that we know of: Robert, Humphrey, Richard, and Enguerran, and two daughters. Robert died young, before his father. Enguerran became a monk at Marmoutier in the Bohon priory. Richard began another branch, whose descendents include (in France) Enjuger de Bohon and Richard de Bohon, bishop of Coutances, and (in England) the Bohons of Midhurst, Jocelin, bishop of Salisbury, and Reginald and Savary, bishops of Bath. Humphrey became the illustrious ancestor of the earls of Hereford.


Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
Page: Jeff Snavely, 24 Feb 1999
Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
Page: John Ravilious (Therav3), 20 Jun 2003
Text: cites KSB Keats-Rohan, Domesday People, I:272-273.
1032 Margaret D'Eu 1090 Adam de Neufmarche 1099 Mabel de Neufmarche 0978 Guillaume de Talon 0980 Mauger of Rouen 0985 Nicholas of St. Andrews 0988 Dapla 0991 - 1049 Anchetil de Harcourt 58 58 Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
Page: 117
1130 - 1170 Bertha de Gloucester de Pitres 40 40 1169 - 1197 Beatrice De Saye 28 28 1164 - 1219 Raoul de Lusignan 55 55 Raoul de Lusignan 1006 - 1036 Drew de Baalun 30 30 1025 0425 Amlawdd Wledig 0430 Gwen ferch Cunedda 0452 Ygerna verch Amlawdd 0474 Gwyar ferch Amlawdd 0400 Cynwal ap Frwdwr Sources:

   1. Page: Ancestry Family Trees
      Note:
      Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=3997&pid=-1206744452 
0380 Frwdwr ap Gwrfawr Sources:

   1. Page: Ancestry Family Trees
      Note:
      Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=3997&pid=-1166339290 
Bruno de Harcourt Hasala ~0730 - >0775 Bruno of Saxony 45 45 Asseburg 0721 Dietrich Asseburg 0911 Sprote Adela de Senlis # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 121e-19

Text: Sprota (Danish wife of William I of Normandy), a Breton (no last name)

# Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
Page: 6, 100
Text: Sporta de Senlis

# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: VI:447 (g)
Text: not named but implied as mother of Richard I & Ralph d'Ivry
0930 Ertemberge de Brioquibec ~0400 Pellinor ~0360 Pelles Brons ~0320 Lambar ap Manael ~0270 Manael ben Catheloys ~0310 Titurel ap Manael ~0220 Catheloys ap Aminadab ~0170 Aminadab be Joshua ~0175 Eurgen verch Lleuver Mawr ~0130 Joshua ben Joseph ~0044 The Rama-Theo Joseph Abt. 3 B.C. Yehoshusa ben Joseph Abt. 10 B.C. Mary Magdelene ~0033 Damaris Tamar ~0037 Jesus Justus Sarah bint Yehoshua <1020 William of Arques and Toulouse
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