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Family Subtree Diagram : James of Scotland (1451)

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child) (seven children) (four children) (a child) (five children) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (five children) (four children) (three children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (three children) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (three children) (four children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) 1394 - 1436 James Stewart 41 41 Born on December 10, 1394, the son of Robert III and Annabella Drummond, he had an eventful childhood. In 1402 his elder brother, David, starved to death in prison at Falkland in Fife.

Before the death of his father in 1406 the authorities sent James to France for safety. During his journey to France, the English captured the young prince and handed him over to Henry IV of England, who imprisoned him and demanded a ransom. Robert III allegedly died from grief over the capture of James. James's uncle, Robert Stewart, 1st Duke of Albany, who became Regent on the death of Robert III, showed no haste in paying for his nephew's release. Albany secured the release of his own son Murdoch, captured at the Battle of Homildon Hill, but not so with James. So for the next 18 years James remained a prisoner/hostage in England. Henry IV had the young Scots King imprisoned and educated in Windsor Castle and in secure large country houses near London.

Scholars believe that during his captivity James wrote The Kingis Quair, an allegorical romance, one of the earliest major works of Scottish literature.

After the death of James's uncle in 1420, the Scots finally paid the ransom of £40,000, and in 1424 James returned to Scotland to find a country in chaos. He took his bride with him – he had met and fallen in love with Joan Beaufort, a cousin of King Henry VI of England, while imprisoned. He married her in London in February 2, 1423. They had eight children.

James was formally crowned King of Scotland at Scone Abbey, Perthshire, on May 2 or 21, 1424. He immediately took strong actions to regain authority and control. In one such action he had the Albany family, who had opposed his actions, executed. The execution of Murdoch, Duke of Albany, and two of Murdoch's sons took place on May 24, 1425 at Castle Hill, Stirling.

James ruled Scotland with a firm hand, and achieved numerous financial and legal reforms. For the purpose of trading with other nations, he made Scots coinage exchangeable for foreign currency only within Scottish borders. He also tried to remodel the Parliament of Scotland along English lines. In foreign policy he renewed the Auld Alliance, an alliance with the French, in 1428.

His actions throughout his reign, though effective, upset many people. During the later years of his reign, they helped to lead to his claim to the throne coming under question.

James I's grandfather, Robert II, had married twice and the awkward circumstances of the first marriage (the one with James's grandmother Elizabeth Mure) led some to dispute its validity. Conflict broke out between the descendants of the first marriage and the unquestionably legitimate descendants of the second marriage over who had the better right to the Scottish throne. Matters came to a head on February 21, 1437, when a group of Scots led by Sir Robert Graham assassinated James at the Friars Preachers Monastery in Perth. He attempted to escape his assailants through a sewer. However, three days previously, he had had the other end of the drain blocked up because of its connection to the tennis court outside, balls habitually got lost in it. (See also: Catherine Douglas.)

A wave of executions followed, of those who had participated in the plot, in March 1437. The authorities executed (among others) James's uncle, Walter Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl, and Atholl's grandson, Robert Stewart, Master of Atholl — both of them descended from Robert II's second marriage).

Children with Joan Beaufort
Margaret Stewart, Princess of Scotland (1424-1445) married Louis XI of France
Isabella Stewart, Princess of Scotland (1426-1494) married Francis I, Duke of Brittany
Eleanor Stewart, Princess of Scotland (1433-1484) married Sigismund, Archduke of Austria
Mary of Scotland, Countess of Buchan died 1465 married Wolfart VI van Borsselen
Joan of Scotland, Countess of Morton (c. 1428-1486) married James Douglas, 1st Earl of Morton
James II of Scotland (1430-1460)
Alexander Stewart, Duke of Rothesay (born and died 1430); Twin of James
Annabella Stewart, Princess of Scotland married and divorced 1. Louis of Savoy, and then married and divorced 2. George Gordon, 2nd Earl of Huntly.


References
E W M Balfour-Melville, James I King of Scots, London 1936
Peter Wordie and Lance St John Butler (1989). "Tennis in Scotland" in The Royal Game. Stirling: Falkland Palace Real Tennis Club. ISBN 0-9514622-0-2 or ISBN 0-9514622-1-0.
0970 Judith Luxembourg 0904 Guntram Nordgau 1020 Gunhilda of Germany 1020 Beatrix 0970 Bruno of Carinthia 1088 - 1139 Simon of Lorraine 51 51 1093 - 1151 Judith de Wassemberg 58 58 Sophia Arpad of Hungary 0934 - 0992 Edith Hedwig de Longwy 58 58 0922 - 0998 Siegfried de Luxembourg 76 76 # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 143-19 ,148-19
0954 - 1020 Eva de Luxembourg 66 66 0965 - 1009 Frederic de Luxembourg 44 44 0895 - 0923 Richinius de Ardennes 28 28 0900 - 0972 Eberhard von Hohenburg 72 72 # Occupation: Alsace
# Note: Title: Royalty for Commoners, by Stuart
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 143-19

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tamer&id=I15623
0946 Gerhard von Hohenburg 0876 - 0900 Hildegarde de Ferrette 24 24 0870 - 0940 Hugo III von Hohenburg 70 70 0840 Adelaide de Vermandois 0832 - 0910 Eberhard of Nordgau 78 78 0810 Evesna Saxony 0802 - 0881 Eberhard Nordgau 79 79 0772 - 0844 Meginhard of Hamalant 72 72 0730 - 0777 Elizabeth Luneville 47 47 0730 - 0777 Eberhard Nordgau 47 47 0698 - 0735 Alberic of Lower Alsace 37 37 1006 - 1072 Otto von Scheyern 66 66 0880 - 0963 Berkhard von Wettin 83 83 0900 von Wettin 0888 Werner of Speyergau 0918 - 0955 Conrad of Lorraine 37 37 0860 - 0908 Berkhard von Grabfeldgau 48 48 Sources:
Abbrev: Lloyd A. Horrocks' Rootsweb GEDCOM
Title: Horrocks, Lloyd A., Rootsweb GEDCOM. (Horrocks.2@osu.edu)
Abbrev: Royalty for Commoners
Title: Stuart, Roderick W. Royalty for Commoners. Genealogical Publishing Co ., Inc. Baltimore, Maryland. Third Edition. 1998. ., Inc. Baltimore, Maryland. Third Edition. 1998. ., Inc. Baltimore, Maryland. Third Edition. 1998.
0865 - 0936 Adred von Loingau 71 71 Sources:
Author: Gentala, Peter Grard
Title: "Ancient Genealogy & Mythology: Genealogical Research of Peter Grard Gentala"
Publication: 10 Feb 2001
Repository:
Name: Kirk Larson
Laguna Niguel, CA 92677 U.S.A.
Kirk Larson
23512 Belmar Dr.
Laguna Niguel
CA
92677
U.S.A.
Author: Larson, Kirk
Title: "Genealogical Research of Kirk Larson"
Publication: Personal Research Works including Bethune & Hohenlohe Descendants, 1981-2001, Kirk Larson, Private Library
Repository:
Name: Kirk Larson
Laguna Niguel, CA 92677 U.S.A.
Kirk Larson
23512 Belmar Dr.
Laguna Niguel
CA
92677
U.S.A.
Author: Arnaud Bunel
Title: "Héraldique européenne"
Publication: Coats of Arms for European Royalty and Nobility (http://www.heraldique-europeenne.org, Arnaud Bunel, 1998) , Internet
Note:
"Armigerous" (ahr-MIJ-ehr-us) adjective

Bearing or entitled to bear heraldic arms.

The reason the notion of a family crest was brought into the language was that those who were armigerous (entitled to bear arms) used to put their crest or achieveme
Repository:
Name: Arnaud Bunel
Arnaud Bunel
France

0990 - 1039 Conrad of Saxony 49 49 Conrad II (circa 990 - 1039) was the son of count Henry of Speyer. He was elected king in 1024 and crowned emperor of the Holy Roman Empire on March 26, 1027, the first member of the Salian Dynasty.

During his reign, he proved that the German monarchy had become a viable institution. Survival of the monarchy was no longer dependent on contracts between sovereign and territorial nobles.

Conrad grew up poor by the standards of the nobility and was raised by the bishop of Worms and was reputed to be prudent and firm out of consciousness of deprivation. In 1016 he married Gisela of Swabia, a widowed duchess. Both parties claimed descent from Charlemagne and were thus distantly related. Strict canonists took exception to the marriage and emperor Henry II used these findings to force Conrad into temporary exile. They became reconciled and upon Henry's death in 1024 Conrad appeared as candidate before the electoral assembly of princes at Kamba in the Rhineland. He was elected by the majority and was crowned king in Mainz on September 8, 1024.

The Italian bishops paid homage at Conrad's court at Constance in June 1025, but lay princes sought to elect William III (V), Duke of Aquitaine, as king instead. However early in 1026 Conrad went to Milan, where archbishop Ariberto crowned him king of Italy. After overcoming some opposition of the towns Conrad reached Rome, where Pope John XIX crowned him emperor on Easter, 1027.

He formally confirmed the popular legal traditions of Saxony and issued new constitutions for Lombardy. In 1028 at Aachen he had his son Henry elected and anointed king of Germany. Henry married Cunigunde or Gunhilda, daughter of King Canute the Great of England, Denmark, Sweden and Norway. This was an arrangement that Conrad had made many years ago, when he gave Canute the Great parts of northern Germany to administer. Henry, the later EmperorHenry III, became chief counsellor of his father.

Conrad campaigned against Poland in 1028 and forced Mieszko II, son and heir of Boleslaus I, to make peace and return land that Boleslaw I had conquered from the empire during his father's reign. At the death of Henry II the bold and rebellious Duke of Poland Mieszko II had tried to throw off vassalage, but then submitted and swore to be emperor Conrad's faithful vassal. Mieszko II quit being self-anointed king and returned to being duke of Poland.

When King Rudolf of Burgundy died on February 2, 1032, he left his kingdom to Conrad. (How? why? was he a legitimate blood heir?) Despite some opposition, the Burgundian princes (how many princes did Burgundy have? is this prince in the sense or ruler -- wasn't Burgundy ruled by a duke?) paid homage to Conrad in Zurich in 1034. This kingdom of Burgundy included Switzerland. It did not include the Duchy of Burgundy. That belonged at that time to the French King.

Conrad upheld the rights of the valvassores (knights and burghers of the cities) of Italy against Archbishop Aribert of Milan and the princes. The princes as vassal lords and the bishop had conspired to rescind rights from the burghers. With skillful diplomacy and luck Conrad restored order. He went on to southern Italy, to Salerno and Anversa and appointed Richer from Germany as abbot of Monte Cassino.

During the return trip to Germany an epidemic broke out amongs the troops. Conrad's daughter-in-law and stepson died. Conrad himself returned safely and held several important courts in Solothurn, Strasbourg and in Goslar. His son Henry was invested with the kingdom of Burgundy.

A year later in 1039 Conrad fell ill and died in Utrecht.
0969 - 0997 Henry of Saxony 28 28 0975 - 1045 Adelaide of Alsace 70 70 0931 - 0953 Luitgard of Saxony 22 22 0948 - 1004 Otto of Carinthia- Waiblingen 56 56 0952 Judith of Verdun 0850 - 0904 Eberhard of Worms 54 54 0820 Rudolph of Franconia 1075 - 1143 Ermenside de Luxembourg 68 68 1087 Helica von Staufen 1070 - 1120 Frederich von Lengenfeld- Hopfenohe 50 50 1121 - 1170 Eilika von Lengenfeld 49 49 1187 - 1217 Adelheid Von Guelders de Geldern 30 30 1146 - 1191 Agnes de Looz and Rieneck 45 45 1174 - 1231 Ludwig Wittelsbach of Bavaria 56 56 1140 - 1183 Otto Wittelsbach of Bavaria 43 43 1121 - 1156 Otto von Bayern 35 35 Conrad von Bayern 1062 - 1110 Otto von Scheyern 48 48 1070 - 1120 Richardis of Weimar 50 50 Hariga von Diessen 1037 - 1070 Udalrich von Carniola 33 33 1020 - 1044 Poppo von Weimar 24 24 1020 Hadamut von Eppenstein 0975 - 1039 Wilhelm von Weimar 64 64 0990 Oda der Ostmark 0940 - 1003 Wilhelm von Weimar 63 63 0945 von Grabfeld Rudiger van Veltheim Helica van Lengenfeld 1096 - 1142 Folmar de Metz 46 46 1095 - 1157 Mechtild von Dagsburg 62 62 Folmar de Metz Swanhilde 1054 - 1098 Albrecht von Dagsburg 44 44 Henry de Guelders 0963 - 1005 Liutgard Luxembourg 42 42 1089 - 1127 Yolande de Gueldre 38 38 0673 Eticho II Alsace 0920 - 0953 Heinrich of Bavaria 33 33 0883 Hedwig of Bavaria 0934 - 0992 Edith Hedwig de Longwy 58 58 0890 - 0927 Kunigunde Cunegonde de France 37 37 # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 155-21, 143-18

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tamer&id=I10955
1048 - 1129 Clemence of Poitou 81 81 1017 - 1056 Henry of Germany 38 38 Abbrev: Royal Genealogies DB
Title: Denis R. Reid, Royal Genealogies DB (149 Kimrose Lane, Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147-1258)s, Ohio 44147-1258.
Note:
Call number:

216/237-5364

Oklahoma

http://ftp.cac.psu.edu/~saw/royal/royalgen.html ah189@cleveland.freenet.edu
Text: Henry III
0915 - 0974 Luitgarde de Treves 59 59 0840 - 0898 Meginhard of Hamalant 58 58 0850 Dietrich of Hamalant 1452 - 1488 Mary Stewart 36 36 1430 - 1460 James Stewart 29 29 Notes from http://www.gbnf.com/genealog3/maytree/html/notes.HTM

JAMES II STEWART, KING OF SCOTLAND He was born on October 16, 1430 at Holyrood Palace, Edinburgh. He was killed by exploding ordnance during the siege of Roxburgh Castle on August 3, 1460. He was buried in Holyrood Abbey. He married on July 3, 1449 at Holyrood : MARIE VON GELDERN She died on December 1, 1463 and was buried in the Holy Trinity Church, Edinburgh. She was the daughter of Arnold von Geldern, Duke of Gueldres by his wife Katherine von Kleve, the daughter of Adolf von Kleve, Duke of Cleves.
1432 - 1463 Maria of Guelders 31 31 1451 - 1488 James of Scotland 36 36 James III (1451-1488), king of Scotland (1460-1488), son of King James II, born in Stirling. He was crowned king in 1460 after the death of his father. A regency ruled until 1469, when he began his personal rule. Through his marria ge to Margaret of Denmark in the same year, James gained control of the Orkney and Shetland islands. James was unpopular with the Scottish nobles, who were led by his brother Alexander Stewart, duke of Albany. The nobles seized the king and kept him prisoner in the castle at Edinburgh. Under the duke of Albany, English forces took Berwick and advanced to Edinburgh. In 1487, James made peace with the English, thereby further alienating his turbulent nobles, who rose in rebellion and induced James's son, later James IV, to become their nominal head. In the ensuing battle at Sauchieburn between the nobles and the Royalists, James was defeated, and he was murdered after the battle by on e of the rebels. He was succeeded by James IV.
1454 Alexander Stewart 1456 David Stewart 1458 John Stewart 1459 Margaret Stewart 1398 - 1445 Joan Beaufort 47 47 Joan Beaufort (c. 1404 - 15 July 1445), was Queen Consort of the Kingdom of Scotland from 1424 to 1437, being married to James I of Scotland.

She was a daughter of John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset and Margaret Holland. Her paternal grandparents were John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and his mistress and later third wife Katherine Swynford. Her maternal grandparents were Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent and Alice Fitzalan. Alice was a daughter of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor of Lancaster.

On 2 February 1424 at Southwark Cathedral, Joan married James I, shortly before he was formally crowned. They were feasted at Winchester Palace that year by her uncle Henry Cardinal Beaufort. She is said to have been the inspiration of James's famous long poem, The Kingis Quair. They had eight children, including the future James II, and Margaret of Scotland, wife of Louis XI of France. After James I was assassinated in 1437, she took over the regency for her son.


Issue with James I of Scotland
Margaret Stewart, Princess of Scotland (1424-1445) married Louis XI of France
Isabella Stewart, Princess of Scotland (1426-1494) married Francis I, Duke of Brittany
Eleanor Stewart, Princess of Scotland (1433-1484) married Sigismund, Archduke of Austria
Mary of Scotland, Countess of Buchan died 1465 married Wolfart VI van Borsselen
Joan of Scotland, Countess of Morton (c. 1428-1486) married James Douglas, 1st Earl of Morton
James II of Scotland (1430-1460)
Alexander Stewart, Duke of Rothesay (born and died 1430); Twin of James
Annabella Stewart, Princess of Scotland married and divorced 1. Louis of Savoy, and then married and divorced 2. George Gordon, 2nd Earl of Huntly.

Second Marriage and Issue
In 1439 Joan married James Stewart, the Black Knight of Lorn (~1383 - >1451). They had three children:

John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl (c. 1440 - September 12, 1512).
James Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan (1442-1499), High Chamberlain of Scotland in 1471 and Scottish Ambassador to France in 1473.
Andrew Stewart, Bishop of Moray

References
Ashley, Mike (2002). British Kings & Queens. Carroll & Graf. ISBN 0-7867-1104-3.  pages 461 & 486

1424 - 1445 Margaret Stewart 21 21 1426 - 1494 Isabella Stewart 68 68 1434 - 1484 Eleanor Stewart 50 50 1429 - 1465 Mary of Scotland 36 36 1428 - 1486 Joan of Scotland 58 58 1430 - 1430 Alexander Stewart Twin of James 1432 Annabella Stewart 1337 - 1406 Robert of Scotland 69 69 Robert III (c. 1340 – April 4, 1406), King of Scots (reigned 1390 - 1406), the eldest son of King Robert II by his mistress, Elizabeth Mure, became legitimised with the formal marriage of his parents about 1349. (They had previously married in 1336, but some had criticised that ceremony as uncanonical.)

In 1367, Robert III married Anabella Drummond, daughter of Sir John Drummond of Stobhall and Mary Montifex.

In 1368 his grand-uncle King David II of Scotland created him Earl of Carrick, and he took some part in the government of the kingdom until about 1387, when a kick from a horse disabled him. Probably in consequence of this accident his brother Robert, Earl of Fife, and not the crown prince himself, became guardian of the kingdom in 1389; but the latter succeeded to the throne on his father's death in May 1390.

At this time he changed his baptismal name of John - unpopular owing to its connection with John de Baliol; he also wished to avoid being called John II, as recognition of Balliol's kingship would weaken the Bruce title to the throne - for that of Robert, and became crowned at Scone in August 1390 as King Robert III. Although he probably attended several parliaments, the new king was seen only nominally as the ruler of Scotland, the real power remaining in the hands of his brother, the Earl of Fife.

In 1399, however, owing to the king's "sickness of the body", his elder son, David, Duke of Rothesay, gained appointment as lieutenant of the kingdom; but there followed an English invasion of Scotland, serious differences between Rothesay and his uncle, Robert, now Duke of Albany, and finally in March 1402 Rothesay's mysterious death at Falkland Palace.

Robert III began to fear for the fate of his only surviving son, young James. In February 1406 he had James taken in secrecy to Dirleton Castle to wait for a ship to transport him to France. Robert of Fife sent a large force after Crown Prince James and when a battle was fought near-by, James was put in a rowing boat and ferried to the Bass Rock in the Firth of Forth. The 11-year-old heir to the throne and his guardians were left for a month on the tiny, windswept, rocky island among the boiling seas, before a ship arrived trying to bring James to France. Robert of Fife informed the English King, who arranged the ship's interception. Thus James became a prisoner of the King of England for 18 years. When Robert III heard of his son's capture, he became even more depressed and allegedly died from grief over the capture of James. Robert asked to be buried under a dunghill with the epitaph: Here lies the worst of Kings and the most miserable of men. Instead he was interred at Paisley instead of Scone, the traditional burial ground of the Scottish kings, as he did not consider himself worthy of the honour.


Marriage and issue
Robert III married Annabella Drummond (c. 1350 - 1402), daughter of Sir John Drummond of Stobhall, and by her had seven children:

Princess Margaret, Lady of Galloway married Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas
Prince Robert, Earl of Carrick
Princess Elizabeth, married Sir James Douglas, 1st Lord of Dalkeith
David Stewart, Duke of Rothesay
Princess Mary, married:
1st, George Douglas, 1st Earl of Angus
2nd, Sir James Kennedy of Dunure
3rd, Sir William Graham
4th, Sir William Edmonstone of Culloden
James I of Scotland
Princess Egidia
Amongst King Robert's illegitimate children:

Sir John Stewart
James Stewart of Kilbride

References
This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
1350 - 1401 Annabella Drummond 51 51 Anabella Drummond
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Annabella Drummond)

Anabella Drummond (c. 1350 – 1401) was a queen consort of Robert III of Scotland.

She was the daughter of Sir John Drummond of Stobhall and Mary Montifex. She married John Stewart (the future Robert III) in 1367, and was crowned with her husband at Scone Palace when he came to the throne in 1390.

The Fife burgh of Inverkeithing was a favorite residence of the queen. Her presence is still recalled in the sandstone font, decorated with angels and heraldry, which she presented to the parish church of the town, one of Scotland's finest surviving pieces of late medieval sculpture.

1370 - 1456 Margaret of Scotland 86 86 1378 David of Scotland 1380 - 1458 Mary Stewart 78 78 1383 Robert of Scotland 1387 Elizabeth of Scotland 1390 Egidia of Scotland 1316 - 1390 Robert Stewart 74 74 Robert II (March 2, 1316 – April 19, 1390), was King of Scots from 1371 until his death. He was also the High Steward of Scotland and the first king from the House of Stewart (later spelled "Stuart").

Robert was the sole son of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland (d. 1326) and Marjorie Bruce, daughter of King Robert I of Scotland and his first wife Isabella of Mar. He was delivered by caesarean section, reputedly at Paisley Abbey. His mother, who had been thrown from a horse, survived his birth by some hours at most.

In 1318 the Parliament of Scotland decreed that if King Robert died without sons the crown should pass to Marjorie's son; but the birth of a son afterwards, King David II, to Bruce in 1324 postponed the accession of Robert for nearly forty-two years. Soon after the infant David became king in 1329, the Steward began to take a prominent part in the affairs of Scotland. He was one of the leaders of the Scottish army at the Battle of Halidon Hill in July 1333; and after gaining some successes over the adherents of Edward Balliol in the west of Scotland, he and John Randolph, 3rd Earl of Moray (d. 1346), were chosen as regents of the kingdom, while David sought safety in France.

The regents soon quarrelled; then Randolph fell into the hands of the English and Robert became sole regent, meeting with such success in his efforts to restore the royal authority that the king was able to return to Scotland in 1341. Having handed over the duties of government to David, the Steward escaped from the Battle of Neville's Cross in 1346, and was again chosen regent while the king was a captive in England. Soon after this event some friction arose between Robert and his royal uncle. Accused, probably without truth, of desertion at Neville's Cross, the Steward as heir-presumptive was greatly chagrined by the king's proposal to make Edward III of England, or one of his sons, the heir to the Scottish throne, and by David's marriage with Margaret Logie.

In 1363 he rose in rebellion, and after having made his submission was seized and imprisoned together with four of his sons, being only released a short time before David's death in February 1371. By the terms of the decree of 1318 Robert now succeeded to the throne, and was crowned at Scone, Perthshire in March 1371. He was not a particularly active king. Some steps were taken by the nobles to control the royal authority. In 1378 a war broke out with England; but the king took no part in the fighting, which included the burning of Edinburgh and the Scottish victory at the Battle of Otterburn in 1388.

As age and infirmity were telling upon him, and in 1389 the Parliament appointed his second surviving son Robert, Earl of Fife, afterwards Duke of Albany, guardian of the kingdom. The king died at Dundonald in 1390, and was buried at Scone.

Marriages and issue
His first wife was Elizabeth Mure, by her he had at least ten children:

King Robert III of Scotland (d. 1406), originally called John
Robert Stewart, 1st Duke of Albany (1339–1420)
Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan, and Lord of Badenoch, "the Wolf of Badenoch" (1343–1405)
Margaret Stewart, married John of Islay, Lord of the Isles
Walter Stewart (d. 1362), married Isabella, Countess of Fife
Marjory Stewart, married first John Dunbar, 5th Earl of Moray, second Alexander Keith
Johanna Stewart, married in 1373 Sir John Keith, in 1379 Sir John Lyon, in 1384 Sir James Sandilands
Isabella Stewart, married first James Douglas, 2nd Earl of Douglas, married second David Edmondstone
Katherine Stewart, married Sir Robert Logan of Grugar, later also of Restalrig, Lord High Admiral of Scotland
Elizabeth Stewart, married Sir Thomas Hay, Lord High Constable of Scotland
By his second wife, Euphemia de Ross, daughter of Aodh, Earl of Ross, and widow of the 3rd Earl of Moray, formerly his colleague as regent, he had five children:

David Stewart, 1st Earl of Caithness (d. bef. 1389)
Walter Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl (d. 1437)
Margaret Stewart
Elizabeth Stewart, married 1380 David Lindsay, 1st Earl of Crawford
Egidia Stewart, married 1387 Sir William Douglas of Nithsdale
The confusion about the circumstances of his first marriage would later lead to conflict amongst the descendants of his first marriage (which included James I of Scotland) and the unquestionably legitimate descendants of his second marriage.

Robert had also eight illegitimate children: By Moira Leitch:

John Stewart of Bute, Sheriff of Bute, "the Black Stewart"
By Marion Cardny:

Alexander Stewart, Canon of Glasgow
John Stewart of Dundonald, "the Red Stewart"
James Stewart of Kinfauns
Walter Stewart
John Stewart of Burley, Lord of Burley
Sir John Stewart of Cairdney
Sir Alexander Stewart of Inverlunan
Thomas Stewart, Dean of Dunkeld, Archdeacon and Bishop-elect of St. Andrews

References

Primary
Andrew of Wyntoun, The Orygynale Cronykil of Scotland, edited by D. Laing (Edinburgh, 1872-1879)
John of Fordun, Scotichronicon, continued by Walter Bower, edited by Thomas Hearne (Oxford, 1722)
John Major, Historia majoris Britanniae, translated by A Constable (Edinburgh, 1892)

Secondary
Tytler, PF, History of Scotland (Edinburgh, 1841-1843).
1320 - 1355 Elizabeth Mure 35 35 Elizabeth Mure
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Elizabeth Mure (d. before May 1355) was mistress and then wife of Robert, High Steward of Scotland, and Guardian of Scotland (1338 - 1341 and from October 1346), who later became King Robert II of Scotland.

The daughter of Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan, she initially became the Steward's mistress. He married her in 1336, but the marriage was criticised as uncanonical, so he remarried her in 1349 following a Papal Dispensation dated at Avignon 22 November 1347.

She died before her husband inherited the crown at the rather advanced age of 54, and he married again (Papal Dispensation dated 2 May 1355), so she was never queen of Scotland.

They had at least ten children. Doubts about the validity of her marriage led to family disputes over her children's right to the crown. However on 27 March 1371, "The Lord John (who later took the title of King Robert III), Earl of Carrick and Steward of Scotland, first-born son of King Robert II" was declared heir to the Crown by Parliament in Scone Abbey.


References
Dunbar, Sir Archibald H., Bt., Scottish Kings, a Revised Chronology of Scottish History 1005 - 1625, Edinburgh, 1899, p.160-1.
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Mure"
1340 - 1420 Robert Stewart 80 80 1343 - 1405 Alexander Stuart 62 62 ~1341 Margaret Stuart 1338 - 1362 Walter Stewart 24 24 1352 Marjory Stuart 1350 Johanna Stewart 1348 - 1410 Isabella Eupheme Stewart 62 62 1336 - 1426 Catherine Stuart 90 90 1346 - 1389 Elizabeth Stewart 43 43 1274 - 1329 Robert of Scotland 54 54 Name Suffix: I
Name Prefix: King of Scotland
Nickname: -theBruce-
Ancestral File Number: B2L0-GQ
!-History of Scotland- by Hume Brown, 1909, Vol. 1.
-History of Scotland- by Charles Terry, 1920, charts.

http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page122.asp

ROBERT I (r. 1306-29)
On 25 March 1306, Robert the Bruce was chosen to be King of Scots and to lead the fight for Scottish independence against Edward I of England. Born in 1274 in Ayr, the son of Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick, he was the grandson of the Robert Bruce who had been one of the competitors for the throne after the death of the Maid of Norway. Robert I had been on the English side when Edward moved against Balliol, but he had subsequently joined Wallace's revolt. When Wallace gave up the Guardianship of Scotland in 1298, Robert became joint Guardian with Sir John Comyn of Badenoch (Balliol's nephew). A few weeks before his coronation, Robert killed his greatest rival for the crown - his joint Guardian - in a Dumfries church, during the last of many arguments between them. For this murder, Robert was outlawed by Edward I and excommunicated by Pope Clement V. His reign did not begin well. He was defeated by the English at Methven in Perthshire; his wife, daughter and sisters were imprisoned; and three of his brothers were executed by the English. Robert fled westward to the Antrim coast. (The story of Robert drawing inspiration from a persistent spider mending its web in a cave dates from the sixteenth century.) However, he possessed real military genius and he was helped by the fact that in 1307 Edward I, the self-styled 'Hammer of the Scots', died and was succeeded by his less effective son Edward II. From 1307 onwards, with energy and determination, Robert waged highly successful guerrilla warfare against the English occupiers, establishing control north of the Forth, and gradually won back his kingdom; by 1314, Stirling was the only castle in English hands. His campaign culminated in resounding victory over Edward II (whose larger army of 20,000 outnumbered Robert's forces by three to one) at the Battle of Bannockburn, near Stirling on 24 June 1314.

Bannockburn confirmed the re-establishment of an independent Scottish monarchy. Two years later, his brother and heir presumptive, Edward Bruce, was inaugurated as High King of Ireland (which increased pressure on the English), but was killed in battle in 1318. Even after Bannockburn and the Scottish capture of Berwick in 1318, Edward II refused to give up his claim to the overlordship of Scotland, and so in 1320 the Scottish earls, barons and the 'community of the realm' sent a letter to Pope John XXII declaring that Robert I was their rightful monarch. This 'Declaration of Arbroath' has become perhaps the most famous document in Scottish history. The Declaration asserted the antiquity of the Scottish people and their monarchy: '...we gather from the deeds and books of the ancients, that among other distinguished nations our own nation, namely of Scots, has been marked by many distinctions. It journeyed from Greater Scythia by the Tyrrenhian Sea and the Pillars of Hercules, and dwelt for a long span of time in Spain among the most savage peoples, but nowhere could it be subjugated by any people, however barbarous. From there it came, twelve hundred years after the people of Israel crossed the Red Sea and, having first driven out the Britons and altogether destroyed the Picts, it acquired, with many victories and untold efforts, the places which it now holds ... As the histories of old time bear witness, it has held them free of all servitude ever since. In their kingdom one hundred and thirteen kings of their own royal stock have reigned, the line unbroken by a single foreigner.' The Declaration also had a stark warning for Robert: 'were he to desist from what he has undertaken and be willing to subject us or our kingdom to the king of the English or the English, we would strive to expel him forthwith as our enemy and as a subverter of right, his own and ours, and make someone else our king who is equal to the task of defending us.' In 1324, the Pope recognised Robert as king of an independent Scotland. Two years later, the Franco-Scottish alliance was renewed in the Treaty of Corbeil, by which the Scots were obliged to make war on England should hostilities break out between England and France. In 1327, the English deposed Edward II in favour of his son Edward III and peace was then made between Scotland and England with the treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton, which began with England's total renunciation of all claims to superiority over Scotland. Robert had achieved all he had fought for: ejecting the English, re-establishing peace and gaining recognition as the true king. By that time, King Robert was seriously ill, probably with leprosy, and he died at Cardross, Dunbartonshire on 7 June 1329, aged 54. A few days later, in response to an earlier request by him, the Pope granted permission for kings of Scots to be anointed at their coronation (Scottish kings had previously been enthroned in a mainly secular ceremony at Scone).

This was a clear acknowledgement that the Pope recognised Scotland's independence. Robert I was buried at Dunfermline and, in fulfilment of his dying wish, Sir James Douglas set out to carry his heart to the Holy Land. Sir James was killed fighting the Moors in Granada, in Spain, but the heart was retrieved and brought back to Scotland, to be buried in Melrose Abbey, Roxburghshire.
1278 - 1320 Isabell of Mar 42 42 Isabella of Mar (c. 1277 – December 1296; modern Scottish Gaelic: Iseabail) was the first wife of Robert Bruce. She was the daughter of Domhnall I, Earl of Mar and a woman named Helen (or Ellen) b. 1246 d. 1295, who had previously been the wife of Maol Choluim II, Earl of Fife. Isabella was a wealthy young woman at the time of her arranged marriage to the Earl of Carrick, Robert Bruce. Her father was one of the seven guardians of Scotland who believed Robert Bruce to be the rightful King of Scotland. Despite the risks, he could see the advantage of the two families joining in marriage and bearing an heir to the throne. Mar was the first to sign over the estates of his family to the Bruce.

Isabella was married to Robert at the age of 18 and legend has it that they were much in love. Shortly after their marriage Isabella became pregnant. She had a healthy pregnancy but she died soon after giving birth to a daughter, Marjorie Bruce in 1296. Robert married his second wife, Elizabeth de Burgh, six years later. Isabella's daughter Princess Marjorie (d. 1316) married Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland, and their son became Robert II of Scotland. From him descend the monarchs of the House of Stewart and the later royal families of the United Kingdom


Sources
Felix Skene, editor, Book of Pluscarden, 1877
John of Fordun

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Mar"
1297 - 1316 Majorie of Scotland 19 19 1292 - 1326 Walter of Scotland 34 34 Walter Steward (1293[1] – 9 April 1326 at Bathgate Castle)[2] was the 6th hereditary High Steward of Scotland.

He was son to James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland by his spouse Cecilia, daughter of Patrick Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar and Marjory, daughter of Alexander Comyn, 2nd Earl of Buchan.

Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314[3] commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army.[4] According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas.[5] This is, however, disputed, as it is now claimed that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.[6]

Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.[7]

During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on July 24, 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Biland Abbey, near Melton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.[8]

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St.Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[9]

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, forfeited by John Balliol, was bestowed upon Walter, as well as other lands and the feudal barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire.

Marjorie met her death whilst riding a horse from Paisley to Renfrew on March 2, 1316. She was thrown by the horse at a place called 'The Knock', broke her neck, and is said to have died instantly. She was, however, pregnant, and a "country fellow" is said to have instantly performed a caesarian operation and delivered the child alive, the future King Robert II.[10]

Notes
^ Anderson, William, The Scottish Nation, Edinburgh, 1867, vol.ix, p.513, states he was 21 years of age at Bannockburn.
^ Anderson (1867) vol.ix, p.513
^ Simpson, David, The Genealogical and Chronological History of the Stuarts, Edinburgh, 1713.
^ Anderson (1867) vol.ix, p.513
^ John Prebble The Lion in the North
^ Peter Traquair Freedom's Sword
^ Anderson (1867) vol.ix, p.513
^ Anderson (1867) vol.ix, p.513
^ Angus, William, editor, Miscellaneous Charters 1315-1401, in Miscellany of The Scottish History Society, vol.5, 1933, p.9.
^ Simpson, David, The Genealogical and Chronological History of the Stuarts, Edinburgh, 1713.

References
Simpson, David, The Genealogical and Chronological History of the Stuarts, Edinburgh, 1713.
Burke, Messrs., John and John Bernard, The Royal Families of England Scotland and Wales, with Their Descendants &c., London, 1848, volume 1, pedigree LXVIII, and volume 2 (1851) page xlvi.
Clay, John W., FSA., editor, The Visitation of Cambridge, 1575 and 1619 by Henery St.George, Richmond Herald, Harleian Society, London, 1897, pps: 7 - 11.
Dunbar, Sir Archibald H., Bt., Scottish Kings, a Revised Chronology of Scottish History, 1005 - 1625, Edinburgh, 1899, pps: 126 - 144.
Louda, Jiri, & Maclagan, Michael, Lines of Succession, London, 1981.
Weis, Frederick Lewis, et all, The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, 5th edition, Baltimore, 2002, p.50.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland"
1243 - 1309 James FitzAlan Stewart 66 66 James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland Born in 1243 Died on July 16, 1309
In 1286 James Stewart was chosen as one of six Regents of Scotland. During the Wars of Scottish Independence, he at first submitted to King Edward. However, he joined Sir William Wallace, after whose defeat he joined Robert the Bruce. James Stewart's son Walter married Robert the Bruce's daughter Princess Marjorie.

James married to Egidia de Burgh, daughter of Walter de Burgh, Earl of Ulster and Avelina FitzJohn who was a daughter of Isabel Bigod and grand daughter of Hugh Bigod, Magna Charta Surety. For Egidia's descent please click on Egidia de Burgh .

James and Egidia had the following children:
Andrew Stewart
Walter Stewart
Sir John Stewart, killed at Dundalk, 1318
Sir James Stewart of Durrisdeer
Egidia Stewart

James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland Born in 1243 Died on July 16, 1309
In 1286 James Stewart was chosen as one of six Regents of Scotland. During the Wars of Scottish Independence, he at first submitted to King Edward. However, he joined Sir William Wallace, after whose defeat he joined Robert the Bruce. James Stewart's son Walter married Robert the Bruce's daughter Princess Marjorie.

James married to Egidia de Burgh, daughter of Walter de Burgh, Earl of Ulster and Avelina FitzJohn who was a daughter of Isabel Bigod and grand daughter of Hugh Bigod, Magna Charta Surety. For Egidia's descent please click on Egidia de Burgh .

James and Egidia had the following children:
Andrew Stewart
Walter Stewart
Sir John Stewart, killed at Dundalk, 1318
Sir James Stewart of Durrisdeer
Egidia Stewart
1263 Egidia de Burgh 1290 Andrew Stewart 1294 John Stewart 1298 James Stewart 1296 Egidia Stewart 1243 - 1297 Donald de Maraka Ehislach 54 54 Domhnall I, Earl of Mar
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Domhnall I Earl of Mar - Domhnall mac Uilleim (Donald, William's son) - was the seventh known Mormaer of Mar, ruling from 1276 until his death somewhere between 1297 and 1302.

Domhnall was a strong supporter of the Bruce cause during the crisis of the late 13th century. He was at Norham in 1292, probably in the camp of Robert de Brus, then Earl of Carrick.

He was married to Helen (sometimes called Ellen), who herself had previously been married to Mormaer Maol Choluim II, Earl of Fife. By Helen, he had three sons, including his successor Gartnait, and two daughters. His daughter Isabella of Mar was the first wife of Robert I of Scotland and mother of Marjorie Bruce.

The last record of a living Domhnall comes from 1297, and the earliest record of his son Gartnait as Mormaer is from 1305, creating the range of Domhnall's possible year of death to somewhere in between these two points. However, a document dating to 1302,[1] containing terms of reconciliation between Edward I and Robert, stipulates that Robert should act as warden of Gartnait, implying that Domhnall had just died.


References
^ Barrow, G. W. S. (1988). Robert Bruce and the Community of the Realm of Scotland, 3rd ed., Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. ISBN 0-85224-539-4. 
1206 - 1253 Elen ferch Llewelyn 47 47 1274 Duncan of Mar 1276 Alexander of Mar 1270 - 1326 Marjory of Mar 56 56 1272 Gratney of Mar 1280 Mary Ehislach of Mar 1222 - 1281 William de Maraka 59 59 Uilleam, Earl of Mar
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Uilleam of Mar - Uilleam mac Dhonnchaidh (William, Duncan's son) - was perhaps the greatest of the Mar mormaers, ruling Mar from 1244 to 1276.

Uilleam was responsible for the construction of Kildrummy Castle, the greatest castle to have been built in 13th century northern Scotland. It is one of the few examples where a native Scottish magnate built a large-scale fortification, something normally practiced by the incoming French.

Uilleam, more than any of his predecessors, participated in Scottish and even British-wide politics, becoming a leading figure in the royal regime of Alexander II, and the minority of Alexander III. By 1244, Uilleam had married into the Comyn house, the fastest rising foreign family in the Scottish kingdom. He married Isabel, the daughter of Count William Comyn of Buchan. The Comyn-Mar alliance helped fight off the ambitions of the Durwards, who were then in prime favor with the king.

Alan Durward used his descent from a daughter of Gille Críst to contest Uilleam's right to the Mormaerdom, but Uilleam successfully held off these claims. Uilleam and the Comyn Count of Menteith then launched accusations of treason towards Alan while at the court of Henry III of England at York.

Uilleam engaged in supplementing his power on a nation-wide basis. He held the post of Sheriff of Dumbarton between 1264 and 1266, a post which opened up connections in the western Highlands. Uilleam was able to marry his younger son Donnchadh to Christina MacRuaridh, the heiress of the Hebridean chief Alan MacRuadridh, the principle Hebridean supporter of the Scottish cause against Norway.

When his wife Isabel died in 1267, Uilleam married Muriel, the daughter of Maol Íosa II, Mormaer of Strathearn.

Uilleam died in 1276, and was succeeded by his son Domhnall.


Bibliography
Oram, Richard D., "The Earls and Earldom of Mar, c1150-1300," Steve Boardman and Alasdair Ross (eds.) The Exercise of Power in Medieval Scotland, c.1200-1500, (Dublin/Portland, 2003).
1223 - 1267 Elizabeth Comyn 44 44 1153 - 1244 Duncan of Mar 91 91 Donnchadh, Earl of Mar
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Donnchadh of Mar, (Anglicized as Duncan), is the fifth known Mormaer of Mar, 1203-1244.

Donnchadh was the son of Morggán and Agnes. Donnchadh benefited from the introduction of feudal primogeniture as a custom, as it enabled him and his kin to exclude the descendants of Gille Críst, whose contemporary leader was Thomas de Lundin, from the succession. Perhaps in gratitude, he named his oldest son William after King Willian I, the probable source of the innovation in Mar's inheritance custom. He married Orabillis of Nessius, by whom he fathered William, and died in 1244.


Bibliography
Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History: AD 500-1286, 2 Vols (Edinburgh, 1922), p. 493, n. 1
Oram, Richard D., "The Earls and Earldom of Mar, c1150-1300," Steve Boardman and Alasdair Ross (eds.) The Exercise of Power in Medieval Scotland, c.1200-1500, (Dublin/Portland, 2003), pp. 46-66
Roberts, John L., Lost Kingdoms: Celtic Scotland in the Middle Ages, (Edinburgh, 1997), pp. 55-6
1207 - 1250 Orabillis of Nessius 43 43 1115 - 1183 Morgund mac Gylocher 68 68 Morggán, Earl of Mar
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Morggán of Mar, is the first Mormaer of Mar to appear in history as "more than a characterless name in a witness-list."1. His father was Gille Chlerig. He is often known as Morgrund or Morgan.

It is possible that Morggán participated in the so-called Revolt of the Earls, a protest by some of the native Scottish nobility at King Máel Coluim IV's trip to France as a vassal of King Henry II of England.

It is also possible that he became estranged from the French-speaking king William I, as Morggán's name appears in no royal acta of the latter king's reign.

He married Ada, a patroness of churches. Agnes was probably related to the de Warrene family - the family who married Ada de Warenne to king Máel Coluim IV. Morggán and Ada had at least one son, Donnchad, who eventually succeeded to the Mormaerdom. Morggán had another two sons, Máel Coluim and James, but they may have been illegitimate - i.e. the product of an uncanonical marriage acceptable in the celtic system, but not in the Franco-Roman system then gaining favor in Scotland.

His daughter Alesta of Mar was married to Alan Fitzwalter, 2nd High Steward of Scotland and was mother to Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland.

He appears in royal charters dated as early as 1147. He is attested in the documents for the last time in 1178, and was certainly dead by 1183.

References
1. Oram, "The Earls and Earldom of Mar", p. 47

Bibliography
Richard D. Oram, "The Earls and Earldom of Mar, c1150-1300," Steve Boardman and Alasdair Ross (eds.) The Exercise of Power in Medieval Scotland, c.1200-1500, (Dublin/Portland, 2003). 
1120 Agnes 1159 John Mar 1149 Malcolm Mar 1151 James Mar 1155 Donald Mar 1157 David Mar Gilchrist of Mar Alestra of Mar 1082 Gillocher of Mar Gille Chlerig, Earl of Mar
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Gille Chlerig,1 also Gillocheri 2 or Gillocher, Gillocher or Gylocher is a Gaelic name attested only in a Latin source, a 13th century forgery designed to advance the cause of Scottish independence. The name is highly corrupted, and therefore the name and meaning is unclear. Gille Chlerig is not known in any capacity other than being father of Morggán, but most scholars seem to be comfortable accepting him as the Mormaer of Mar who preceded his son Morggán.


References
1. Anderson, Early Sources, Vol. II, p. 494 in n.1 of 493
2. Oram, "The Earls and Earldom of Mar", p. 47

Bibliography
Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History: AD 500-1286, 2 Vols (Edinburgh, 1922)
Richard D. Oram, "The Earls and Earldom of Mar, c1150-1300," Steve Boardman and Alasdair Ross (eds.) The Exercise of Power in Medieval Scotland, c.1200-1500, (Dublin/Portland, 2003). pp. 46-66
Roberts, John L., Lost Kingdoms: Celtic Scotland in the Middle Ages, (Edinburgh, 1997), pp. 55-6
1089 1293 - 1380 Adam Mure 87 87 1275 - 1415 Joanna Danzielstoun 140 140 1266 Hugh de Danzielstoun John de Danzielstoun Notes from http://home.austarnet.com.au/dfgoonan/DANZIELSTOUN.htm

Sir John de DANZIELSTOUN of that ilk a.k.a. DANIELSTON, DENNISTOUN occ: Sheriff of Dumbartonm. Mary FLEMING children of Sir John de DANZIELSTOUN and Mary FLEMING:
Sir Robert;
Walter, Bishop of St. Andrews;
Sir William of Colgrain;
Hugh;
Malcolm;
Janet m. Sir Adam MURE of Rowallan

of that ilk, Sheriff of Dumbarton

Sheriff of Dumbarton
1265 - 1348 William Mure 83 83 1291 Reynold Mure 1295 Mure 1297 Mure 1231 Archibald Mure 1235 Margaret de Montgomerie 1262 Margaret Mure 1263 Jonet Mure 1269 Andrew Mure 1200 - 1280 Gilchrist Mure 80 80 1204 Isabel Cumming 1233 Elizabeth Mure 1235 Anicia Mure 1174 - 1249 David de Moore 75 75 1176 1178 Walter Cumming 1209 - 1285 John de Montgomerie 76 76 1225 Margaret Murray ~1265 John de Montgomerie 1195 William Murray 1190 - 1237 Alan de Montgomery 47 47 1230 William Montgomery D. 1214 John de Montgomery Helen de Kent Marjory FitzAlan D. 1190 Alan de Montgomery D. 1179 Robert de Montgomery Robert de Montgomerie ('de Mundegumri')

1st of Eaglesham

Robert married Marjory FitzAlan, the daughter of Walter FitzAlan, First hereditary High Steward of Scotland. He became the First Earl of Eaglesham, Renfrewshire, Scotland after receiving those lands as dowry from Walter. He died in 1178.
Hugh de Mundegumri Robert de Kent 1228 Margaret de Lindsay ~1326 - 1373 John Drummond 47 47 1345 Mary Montefex 1370 Malcolm Drummond 1344 William Drummond 1295 Malcolm Drummond 1265 - 1301 John Drummond 36 36 1270 Stewart 1297 Gilbert Drummond 1301 Walter Drummond 1300 Margaret Drummond 1239 - 1329 Malcolm Drummond 90 90 1267 Gilbert Drummond 1269 Thomas Drummond 1275 Margaret Drummond 1210 - 1260 Malcolm Beg Drummond 50 50 1220 Ada 1241 John Drummond 1150 - 1200 Malcolm Drummond 50 50 1177 Roderick Drummond 1125 - 1180 John Drummond 55 55 1100 - 1155 Maurice Drummond 55 55 1085 - 1131 Malcolm Drummond 46 46 1060 - 1093 Maurice Drummond 33 33 1035 George 1035 Agatha 1010 Gundolph Podiebradius 1010 - 1061 Andrbe 51 51 1015 - 1061 Anastbacia 46 46 0955 - 0978 Michael Arpad 23 23 0982 Ladislau 0990 Laroslaw 1150 Maldwin 1150 Isabel 1125 Gualter 1245 Walter Stewart 1320 Walter Montefex 1409 - 1473 Arnold of Guelders 64 64 1417 - 1479 Katharina of Kleve 61 61 1434 Willem of Guelders 1436 Margaretha of Guelders 1439 Catharina of Guelders 1440 Adlolf of Geldern 1385 - 1451 Jan Heer van Egmond 66 66 1389 - 1415 Maria van Arkel 26 26 1412 Willem Heer van Egmond 1337 - 1409 Arend van Egmond & Ijsselstein 72 72 1350 - 1434 Jolanthe of Leiningen 84 84 1387 Willem van Egmond van Ijsselstein 1310 - 1368 Jan Heer van Egmond 58 58 1314 - 1377 Guyote van Amstel 63 63 1341 Albrecht van Egmond 1332 Beatrijs van Egmond 1334 Bartha van Egmond 1338 Catharina van Egmond 1339 Willem van Egmond 1343 Antonia van Egmond 1345 Elisabeth van Egmond 1348 Griete van Egmond 1350 Maria van Egmond 1355 Gerrit van Egmond 1283 - 1321 Wouter Heer van Egmond 38 38 1290 - 1323 Beatrijs van de Doortoge 33 33 1317 Yda van Egmond 1314 Wouter van Egmond 1319 Sofia van Egmond 1320 Gerrit van Egmond 1260 - 1300 Gerard van Egmond 40 40 1262 - 1297 Elisabeth van Strijen 35 35 1281 Willem Heer van Egmond 1285 Claes van Egmond 1287 Jan van Egmond 1289 Aleijd van Egmond 1235 - 1304 Willem Heer van Egmond 69 69 1239 - 1297 Ada 58 58 1243 Halewine van Egmond 1264 Maria van Egmond 1200 - 1242 Gerard Heer van Egmond 42 42 1204 - 1262 Mabilia 58 58 1180 - 1234 Willem Heer van Egmond 54 54 1182 - 1244 Badeloch 62 62 1158 - 1208 Wouter Heer van Egmond 50 50 1160 Mabilia 1178 Gerard van Egmond 1182 Wouter van Egmond 1130 - 1168 Aelbrecht Heer van Egmond 38 38 1134 van Henegouwen 1095 - 1158 Beerwout van Egmond 63 63 1099 1128 Dodo van Egmond 1050 - 1093 Berwold van Egmond 43 43 1058 1010 - 1074 Dodo Heer van Egmond 64 64 1014 0976 - 1036 Walger Heer van Egmond 60 60 0980 0940 - 0977 Dodo Heer van Egmond 37 37 0945 0900 Wolbrand Heer van Egmond 0905 0906 Radbold Heer van Egmond 1255 - 1306 Dirk van de Doortoge 51 51 1259 Ermegaerd 1230 Floris van Brederode 1230 1257 Jan van de Doortoge 1259 Floris van de Doortoge 1261 van de Doortoge 1263 Badeloge van de Doortoge 1202 - 1231 Dirk Drossard Heer van Brederode 29 29 1205 Alverade van Heusden 1226 Willem Heer van Brederode 1228 Dirk van Brederode 1229 Aleidis van Brederode 1230 Catharina van Brederode 1176 - 1244 Willem Heer van Teijlingen 68 68 1179 Baldwin Heer van Heusden 1183 Aleijdis Perseyn 1287 - 1310 Arend van Amstel 23 23 1291 - 1344 Marie de Avesnes 53 53 1253 - 1317 Guy de Avesnes 64 64 1292 Aleid de Avesnes 1291 Marie de Avesnes 1295 Geertruid de Avesnes 1320 - 1397 Friedrich of Leiningen 77 77 1330 - 1387 Jolanthe of Julich 57 57 1360 Friedrich of Leiningen 1340 Jutte of Leiningen 1353 Elisabeth of Leiningen 1294 - 1342 Friedrich of Leiningen 48 48 1296 Jutte of Limburg 1322 Emich of Leiningen 1316 Imagine of Leiningen 1324 Elisabeth of Leiningen 1272 - 1327 Friedrich of Leiningen 55 55 1274 Sofie of Freiburg- Urach 1290 Elisabeth of Leiningen 1247 - 1316 Friedrich of Leiningen 69 69 1246 - 1296 Johanne of Sponheim- Kreuznach 50 50 1271 Ferriata of Leiningen 1273 Mathilde of Leiningen 1275 Agnes of Leiningen 1276 Gottfried of Leiningen- Hartenburg 1278 Emich of Leiningen 1212 - 1287 Friedrich of Leiningen- Alteiningen 75 75 1220 Adelheid of Habsburg Kyburg 1186 - 1237 Friedrich of Saarbrucken Hartenburg Leining 51 51 1190 - 1263 Agnes of Eberstein 73 73 1216 Heinrich of Leiningen 1218 Berthold of Leiningen 1220 Eberhard of Leiningen 1222 Walram of Leiningen 1226 of Leiningen 1230 Agnes of Leiningen 1214 Emich of Leiningen Landeck 1210 Simon of Leiningen 1208 Elisabeth of Saarbrhucken- Leiningen 1160 - 1207 Simon of Saarbrucken 47 47 1150 - 1235 Luitgard of Leiningen 85 85 1178 Gisele of Saarbrucken 1224 Agnes of Saarbrucken 1110 - 1189 Emich of Leiningen 79 79 1114 Elisabeth von Eberstein 1134 Hermann of Leiningen 1136 Eberhard of Leiningen 1138 Friedrich of Leiningen 1140 Adolf of Leiningen 1143 Emich of Leiningen 1146 Elisabeth of Leiningen 1148 Alberat of Leiningen 1152 Siegmund of Leiningen 1150 Luitgard of Leiningen 1082 - 1141 Emich of Leiningen 59 59 1084 Alberat von Nassau 1106 Gunther of Leiningen 1108 Heinrich of Leiningen 1054 - 1117 Emich of Leiningen 63 63 1058 Adelheid of Leiningen 1080 Gerlach of Leiningen 1084 Konrad of Leiningen 1086 Siegfried of Leiningen 1144 - 1219 Eberhard of Eberstein 75 75 1146 - 1207 Kunigunde of Andechs 61 61 1168 Eberhard of Eberstein 1170 Otto of Eberstein 1172 Bertold of Eberstein 1174 Albert of Eberstein 1177 Kunigunde of Eberstein 1180 Konrad of Eberstein 1196 Hedwig of Eberstein 1123 Eberhard of Eberstein 1100 Bertold of Eberstein 1104 Uta von Calw of Sinzheim 1124 Bertold of Eberstein 1126 Luitgard of Eberstein 1128 Uta von Eberstein 1073 Bertold of Eberstein 1045 - 1113 Bertold of Eberstein 68 68 1049 Adelheid of Eberstien 1075 Eberhard of Eberstien 1077 Hugo of Eberstein