Click to enlarge/reduce the GenoMap image Hide this GenoMap frame

Family Subtree Diagram : .Elizabeth Wood (1682)

PLEASE NOTE: If you do not see a GRAPHIC IMAGE of a family tree here but are seeing this text instead then it is most probably because the web server is not correctly configured to serve svg pages correctly. see http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/SVG:Server_Configuration for information on how to correctly configure a web server for svg files. ? Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Parent Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Parent Parent Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Biological Child Marriage (two children) Marriage (a child) Marriage (a child) Marriage Marriage (three children) Marriage (three children) Marriage (four children) Marriage (five children) Marriage (a child) Marriage (a child) Marriage (a child) Marriage (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) Marriage (two children) (five children) (a child) (three children) (seven children) (three children) (three children) (two children) (six children) (a child) (six children) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (four children) (a child) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (two children) (four children) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (two children) (two children) (two children) (two children) (five children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (three children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (five children) (two children) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (three children) (two children) (three children) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (five children) (two children) (two children) (three children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (three children) (a child) (two children) (five children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (six children) (three children) (five children) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (four children) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (two children) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (two children) (a child) (two children) (two children) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (three children) (five children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (two children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (four children) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) (a child) 1065 - 1122 Hugh de Baliol 57 57 Northumberland Families. Hedley, W. Percy, Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland Press Ltd., Gateshead, England, 1968, Barony of Bothal, pp. 191-193.
Title: English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086 - 1327
Author: I. J. Sanders
Publication: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1960,p. 25 fn '4' & p. 131 fn '2'
1095 - 1153 Bernard Reginald de Baliol 58 58 English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086 - 1327
Author: I. J. Sanders
Publication: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1960
1035 Amilia de Montgomery Niece of Earl Roger Montgomery; m. Rainald the Sheriff of Shropshire. [Rainauld the Sheriff's Shropshire Land Holdings in Domesday 1086

WAITE, NEWLIN LINE
0980 Wydo Baliol Father of Guy Baliol. [Charlemagne & Others, Chart 2908b] 1077 Guido (Guy) Baliol 1044 Hugh de Baliol 1046 Wydo de Baliol 1016 Joseline De Vetulis 1015 Hugh De Montgomery 0985 Roger de Montgomerie 1050 - 1113 William Peverel 63 63 # Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: IV:311
1003 - 1050 Heleve Arlette de Falaise 47 47 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: cxiv
Text: Harlette is the common mother between William I and Robert de Mortain.

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 121-23, 130-23

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: III:164

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tamer&id=I5702
0982 Doda Falaise 0978 - 1033 Fulbert de Falaise 55 55 [Robert de Brus.ged]

Rollo, or Filbert, Chamberlain to Robert, Duke of Normandy, had gift of the castle and honor of Croy, in Pickardy, from whence his posterity assumed this surname, which was afterwards changed from Croy to Grey. They had a daughter Heruela, or Herlotta, mother of William, the Conqueror.

Arms for Grey of Codnor and Rotherfield: Barry of six, argent and azure.

Occupation: Tanner & Ferrier
1008 - 1059 Reynald Croy 51 51 1002 Walter de Falaise 1030 - 1072 Ranulph Peverel 42 42 1006 Ingelric 1065 Robert Peverel 1060 Pagan Peverel 1067 Hamon Peverell 1650 Frances Addra Cheney 1640 - 1698 John Wood 58 58 J. Cheney 1605 John Cheney 1568 - 1614 Elizabeth Burrage 46 46 1568 - 1623 John Cheney 55 55 0980 Pappia Normandy # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 177-3

Marriage 1 *Gulbert de Saint Valery b: ABT 0977 in St Valery,France

    * Married: ABT 1004 in St Valery,France

Children

   1. Has Children *Bernard II de Saint Valery b: ABT 1005 in St Valery,France
   2. Has Children *Richard de Hugleville b: 1008 in St Valaery-en-Caux, Normandy, France
0911 - 0975 Asperling de Vaudreuil 64 64 0855 Malahule Eysteinsson # Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 107
# Note:
# Note: -----------------------------------------------------
# Note: Houts, Elisabeth, M. C. Van. The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumiéges, Orderic Vitalis, and Robert of Torigni, Vol. II. p 94-5,Clarendon Press, Oxford: 1995.
# Note:
# Note: http://www.genealogy.dutton.net/
0944 - 0975 Edgar of England 31 31 0947 - 1000 Aelfrthryth of Devon 53 53 0874 Ecgwyn Aethelstan 1150 Ermengarde De Beaumont 1170 Margaret of Scotland 1160 Ada of Scotland 1114 - 1152 Henry Caenmore of Scotland 38 38 Earl of Huntingdon
Earl of Northumberland

Sources:

   1. Abbrev: The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants
      Title: Gary Boyd Roberts
   2. Abbrev: GEDCOM File : mwballard.ged
      Title: Mark Willis Ballard, GEDCOM File : mwballard.ged
      Note:
      6928 N. Lakewood Avenue
      773-743-6663
      mwballard52@yahoo.com

# Note:

    After Earl Simon's [Matilda's 1st husband] death, his Widow married David I of Scotland, who consequently became Earl of Huntingdon too, keeping the Earldom even after he succeeded his brother as King of Scots. He sided with the Empress Maud against Stephen I but came to terms with the latter and made the Earldom over to his son Henry. Henry swore fealty to Stephen but subsequently fought against him under the Scottish banner, which may account for Simon de St Liz's son, another Simon, being recognized as Earl of Huntingdon before Henry's death in 1152. [Burke's Peerage]

---------------------------------------------------

    Henry, son of the said David, King of Scotland, on condition of swearing allegiance to Stephen, had the Earldom and honour of Huntingdon, with the borough of Doncaster and Carlisle as an augmentation thereto. He was in such high estimation with King Stephen that, upon that monarch's solemn celebration of the feast of Easter, he placed the Earl of Huntingdon on his right hand, which gave such displeasure to the nobility then present that William Corbois, or Corbel, Archbishop of Canterbury, Ranulph, Earl of Chester, and several others withdrew from court. He m. Ada, sister of William, Earl of Warrenne and Surrey, and had issue, Malcolm and William, successively Kings of Scotland, David, Ada, m. to Floris, Earl of Holland, and Margaret, m. to Conan le Petit, Earl of Brittany. The earl d. in 1153, a little before his father, and, upon his decease, Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Northampton, was restored to the Earldom of Huntingdon. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 468, St. Liz, Earls of Huntingdon]

# Note:

Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 139-1

Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on
Page: United Kingdom-Ancestry of the British Royal House

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 1474

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: III:167-169, XII/1:496 (g)

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 89-25
0990 - 1039 Roger de Toeni 49 49 # Note: Note: Roger Toeni's 1st wife, Stephanie, is questioned by some; especially her 2nd marriage to Garcias of Spain while Toeni was still alive. I agree that it does not make much sense. However
# Note:
# Note: -------------------------------
# Note:
# Note:

    Roger de Toeni, also called Roger de Conches; fought Muslims in Spain; married 1st? Stephanie (m. 2nd Garsias, King of Spain) sister of Raymond Berenger, Count of Barcelona; married 2nd? Godeheut (m. 2nd Richard, 3rd Count of Evereux), and died
    1038 or 1039 in battle against a neighboring noble whose territory he had overrun in a revolt against the succession of William I the Conqueror to his father's Norman possessions on the grounds that William was illegitimate. [Burke's Peerage]

# Note:
# Note: Note: According to BP, Roger married two different women as 1st husband, both married later husbands. There is no explanation given. Did the first marriage end in divorce? As stated above, I am treating the women as the same person.
# Note:
# Note: ------------------------------
# Note:
# Note:

    ROGER DE TOENI I, styled also DE CONCHES, son and heir, was born probably about 990, for as stated above he was joined with his father in the custody of the castle of Tillières in 1013 or 1014. He was a powerful and haughty man, and banner-bearer of all Normandy. In 1031 or 1032 he attested a charter of Robert I for St. Wandrille. About 1035 he founded the abbey of Chatillon or Conches. While Duke Robert was away on pilgrimage, he went to Spain and distinguished himself in fighting the infidels (b). When he returned to Normandy, he was furious to learn that the boy William had succeeded his father in the Duchy, declaring that a bastard ought not to rule over him and other Normans. Accordingly he rebelled and ravaged the lands of his neighbours, particularly those of Humphrey de Vieilles; whose son Roger de Beaumont marched against him, and in the battle which followed Roger de Toeni and two of his sons were slain. He was a benefactor to the abbey of I'Estrée and confirmed a gift to the abbey of Lire, and witnessed a charter for Jumièges. He married, perhaps 2ndly,[g] Godeheut, whose parentage is unknown. He died as above, probably in 1038 or 1039, and was buried 1 May at Conches. His widow married Richard, 3rd COUNT OF EVREUX. She was a benefactor to Conches. Complete Peerage XII/1:755-7,

---

    (b) Will. de Jumieges, p. 157---by Orderic. In consequence he was styled sometimes Roger of Spain (Orderic, vol i, p. 180; vol iii, p. 338), or Roger the Spaniard (Idem, vol ii, p. 64). However, if the Roger, son of Count Rodulf (cf, p. 755, note "a" above), who according to the Sens Chron. led an army from Normandy to Spain, can be identified with Roger de Toeni, he is said to have gone there at a much earlier date; and after defeating the Saracens, is said to have married a Spanish woman and lived there for 15 years. Then owing to the treachery of the natives he lost most of his men and, leaving his wife in Spain, he returned to Normandy; where he made a concord with Duke Richard, who was displeased at the loss of his army. Afterwards Roger was killed, fighting against a certain neighbor (Rec. des Hist. de France, vol x, p. 223). This Roger's feats in Spain are recorded also by Ademar, who calls him simply Roger, and does not say how long he stayed there (Idem, p. 156). No other Norman than Roger de Toeni seems to be known, who could be identified with the hero of these stories. Cf. Prentout, op. cit., p. 86. See also p. 755, note (a) above and note (g) below. See "Tony of Belvoir", Charles Evans, "Geneal. Mag.", vol 15, 1968, pp. 616-18. [last sentence, referencing Charles Evans, added by CP XIV:613]

---

    [g] Roger, son of Count Rodulf (see note "b" above), married, in Spain, Stephanie, sister of Raymond Berenger; which lady afterwards m. Garsias, King of Spain (Rec. des Hist. de France, vol x, p. 223). This agrees with the statement of Ademar, that he m. a da. (unnamed) of the widowed Ermensede, Countess of Barcelona ((Idem, p. 156), the mother of Raymond abovenamed. If this Roger were Roger de Toeni, he married Godeheut while his 1st wife was alive, and Stephanie m. Garsias III, King of Navarre, while Roger was living.

---

Note: The note "a", p. 755, referred to above is under Roger's father, Ralph.
1033 - 1070 Adeliza de Toeni 37 37 1098 - 1142 Adeliza de Meschines 44 44     Adeliz (or Alice), m. (1) Richard Fitz Gilbert (also styled de Clare), lord of Clare, Suffolk, d. 1136; m. (2) Robert de Condet (or Cundy), d. c 1141, lord of Thorngate Castle in the city of Lincoln, and of Wickhambreux, Kent, Grimston, co. Notthingham, and South Carlton, Thurlby, Eagle and Skellingthorpe, co. Lincoln, son of Osbert de Condet (or Cundy), d. by 1130, lord of Wickhambreux, Kent, Grimston, co. Nottingham, and South Carlton, Eagle and Skellingthorpe, co. Lincoln, by Adelaide, daughter and heir of William de Chesney, lord of Caenby and Glentham, co. Lincoln. [Magna Charta Sureties]

# Note:
# Note: ------------------------
# Note:
# Note:

    Adeliz (or Alice), daughter of Ranulph le Meschin, Earl of Chester, by Lucy, widow (1) of Ivo Taillebois and (2) Roger Fitz Gerold. She m. (2) Robert de Condet (or Cundy), d. c 1141, lord of Thorngate Castle, Lincoln, etc., son of Osbert de Condet. [Ancestral Roots, Line 246b-25]


Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 132d-27, 246b-25

Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 132d-27,Text: no date, 1st husband ,Text: date implied by death of 1st husband ,153-2
1045 Albreda d'Avranches 1047 - 1101 Hugh d'Avranches 54 54 Title: The Baronage of England, Vol. 1
Author: William Dugdale
Publication: 1675

Title: A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire
Abbrev: Burke's Extinct
Author: Sir Bernard Burke
Publication: Burke's Peerage Genealogical Publishing Co., London and
Baltimore, 1883

---

    2nd Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches. Hugh was one of William the Conqueror's chief councillors and contributed 60 ships for the invasion of England in 1066. He was rewarded with vast estates. When Gerbod, earl of Chester, left England in 1071, the Conqueror bestowed his earldom on Hugh. The earldom was granted as a palatinate, giving Hugh powers greater than the norm under the feudal system. William's purpose in giving Hugh such strength was to allow him to function as the main bulwark against his Welsh adversaries. "Extravagant without being liberal he loved show, was always ready for war, and kept an army rather than a household. An inordinate craving for sport lead him to lay waste his own lands that he might have more space for hunting and hawking. He was gluttonous and sensual, becoming so unwieldy that he could scarcely walk, and was generally styled 'Hugh the Fat;' he had many children by different mistresses. His wars with the Welsh were carried on with a savage ferocity, which made the name 'Wolf" [Lupus] bestowed on him in later days an appropriate designation. At the same time he was a wise counsellor, a loyal subject. . ." In the rebellion of 1088, he remained faithful to William Rufus. In 1098, he and Hugh [son of Roger of Montgomery], earl of Shrewsbury, completed the conquest of Anglessy and subdued the larger part of northern Wales. Between the death of King Rufus in 1100 and his own death in 1101, Hugh was one of the principal councillors of the new King Henry I. Having founded the Abbeys of St. Sever in Normandy and St. Werburg at Chester, besides largely endowing that of Whitby, Yorkshire, he became a monk on July 23, 1101, and died four days later. CP notes that "his career was chiefly notorious for gluttony, prodigality and profligacy." He was buried in the cemetery of St. Werberg, but his body was later removed to the Chapter House by earl Ranulph le Meschin.

---

    Upon the detention of Gherbod, a prisoner in Flanders, a Fleming who first held the Earldom of Chester, that dignity was conferred, A.D. 1070, by the Conqueror, upon his half-sister's* son, Hugh de Abrincis (or Avranches, in Normandy), surnamed Lupus, and called by the Welch, Vras, or "the Fat." "Which Hugh," says Dugdale, "being a person of great note at that time amongst the Norman nobility, and an expert soldier, was, for that respect, chiefly placed so near those unconquered Britains, the better to restrain their bold incursions; for it was, 'consilio prudentium,' by the advice of his council, that King William thus advanced him to that government; his power being, also, not ordinary; having royal jurisdiction within the precincts of his earldom--which honor he received to hold as freely . . . as the King himself held England by the crown. But, though the time of his advancement was not till the year 1070, certain it is that he came into England with the Conqueror and thereupon had a grant of Whitby, in Yorkshire, which lordship he soon afterwards disposed of to William de Percy, his associate in that famous expedition." In the contest between William Rufus and his brother, Robert Curthose, this powerful nobleman sided with the former and remained faithful to him during the whole of his reign. He was subsequently in the confidence of Henry I, and one of that monarch's chief councillors.

---

    "In his youth and flourishing age," continues Dugdale, "he was a great lover of worldly pleasures and secular pomp; profuse in giving, and much delighted with interludes, jesters, horses, dogs, and other like vanities; having a large attendance of such persons, of all sorts, as were disposed to those sports; but he had also in his family both clerks and soldiers, who were men of great honor, the venerable Anselme (abbot of Bec, and afterwards archbishop of Canterbury) being his confessor; nay, so devout he grew before his death, that sickness hanging long upon him, he caused himself to be shorn a monk in the abbey of St. Werberge, where, within three days after, he died, 27 July, 1101."

---

    His lordship m. Ermentrude, dau. of Hugh de Claremont, Earl of Bevois, in France, by whom he had an only son, Richard, his successor. Of his illegitimate issue were Ottiwell, tutor to those children of King Henry I who perished at sea; Robert, originally a monk in the abbey of St. Ebrulf, in Normandy, and afterwards abbot of St. Edmundsbury, in Suffolk; and Geva, the wife of Geffrey Riddell, to whom the earl gave Drayton Basset, in Staffordshire.

---

    That this powerful nobleman enjoyed immense wealth in England is evident from the many lordships he held at the general survey; for, besides the whole of Cheshire, excepting the small part which at that time belonged to the bishop, he had nine lordships in Berkshire, two in Devonshire, seven in Yorkshire, six in Wiltshire, ten in Dorsetshire, four in Somersetshire, thirty-two in Suffolk, twelve in Norfolk, one in Hampshire, five in Oxfordshire, three in Buckinghamshire, four in Gloucestershire, two in Huntingdonshire, four in Nottinghamshire, one in Warwickshire, and twenty-two in Leicestershire. It appears too, by the charter of foundation to the abbey of St. Werburge, at Chester, that several eminent persons held the rank of baron under him, which Barones and Homines mentioned therein were the following: -- 1. William Melbanc; 2. Robert, son of Hugo; 3. Hugo, son of Norman; 4. Richard de Vernon; 5. Richard de Rullos; 6. Ranulph Venator; 7. Hugh de Mara; 8. Ranulph, son of Ermiwin; 9. Robert de Fremouz; 10. Walkelinus, nephew of Walter de Vernon; 11. Seward; 12. Giselbert de Venables; 13. Gaufridus de Sartes; 14. Richard de Mesnilwarin; 15. Walter de Vernun. The charter concludes---"Et ut hæc omnia essent rata et stabilia in perpetuum, ego Come Hugo et mei Barones confirmavimus (&c.), ita quod singuli nostrum propria manu, in testimonium posteris signum in modum Crucis facerunt:"--and is signed by the earl himself; Richard his son; Hervey, bishop of Bangor; Ranulph de Meschines, his nephew, who eventually inherited the earldom; Roger Bigod; Alan de Perci; William Constabular; Ranulph Dapifer; William Malbanc; Robert FitzHugh; Hugh FitzNorman; Hamo de Masci; and Bigod de Loges. Those barons, be it remembered, were each and all of them men of great individual power and large territorial possessions. Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester, was s. by his only son (then but seven years of age), Richard de Abrincis, as 2nd earl. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, pp. 1-2, Abrincis, Earls of Chester]

---

* From this, it would appear that Hugh was the son of Emma de Conteville (half-sister of the Conqueror) and Richard, Viscount d'Avranches, rather than being Richard's illegitimate son. I have, thus, corrected my records to reflect this.

---

    Hugh, Count of Avranches and Earl of Chester presents the world of the eleventh century nobleman in its full diversity. A violent military adventurer, a student of vice and self-indulgence, he was a friend of Anselm. Profligate with his income, he was a patron of monasteries. His household contained a bunch of rowdy thugs; it was also cultivated, even pious. Nicknamed 'the fat' or 'the wolf', Hugh died in the habit of a Benedictine monk. If contemporaries saw a contradiction, they have left no sign. Hugh, the son of the count of the Avranchin in western Normandy and nephew of William the Conqueror, probably fought at Hastings. Early in the 1070s he was granted palatine powers over a wide area of the northern Welsh Marches centered on Chester within which, except for church lands and pleas, he, not the king, was sovereign. This grant allowed Hugh complete freedom to establish, by force, French control over the northern frontier with Wales and to penetrate along the coast of North Wales towards Anglesey. Hugh was outside royal supervision, a law unto himself, a tactic copied with the Montgomerys in Shropshire. Taking full advantage of his opportunity, he campaigned relentlessly against the Welsh, extending his power to Bangor, where he established a bishopric in 1092, and Anglesey. Beyond the English frontier, however, his authority could only be sustained by castles, garrisons and repeated raids which, in turn, provoked continual resistance and rebellion. On its fringes, the Norman Conquest remained a messy affair. Elsewhere, Hugh was one of the leading magnates in the Anglo-Norman realms, inheriting Avranches from his father in the 1080s and, by 1086, holding land in twenty counties outside Chester. In the succession disputes after the Conqueror's death, he supported William II and Henry I. Hugh acquired a foul reputation: vicious; violent; addicted to gambling and sex; and so greedy 'that, weighed down by a mountain of fat, he could hardly move.' He was also generous, which explains why his household was always crowded with many as debauched and sybaritic as he. But there was another side. Hugh was, according to Eadmer, an old and close friend of Anselm whom he persuaded to come to England in 1092 to supervise the installation of a community of monks at St Werburgh's Chester. Open-handed to 'good men, clerks as well as knights' as well as bad, he employed a Norman clerk, Gerold, who took upon himself the moral instruction of his fellow courtiers, using admonitory stories from the Bible and, no doubt more popular, stirring tales of Christian warriors and 'holy knights.' In such a raucous atmosphere of passion, carnality, militarism and piety, was nurtured the mentality which, in Hugh's lifetime, generated the Crusades. The knights who, in 1099, stormed Jerusalem and massacred its inhabitants, some of them Hugh's relatives and friends, shared this heady brew of self-righteous, self-pitying extremes of hedonism, brutality, guilt, obligation, spirituality and remorse. Hugh's only son Richard, who was childless, drowned in the White Ship in November 1120. [Who's Who in Early Medieval England, Christopher Tyerman, Shepheard-Walwyn, Ltd., London, 1996; and Encyclopaedia Britannica CD, 1997]

---

    Hugh, Earl of Chester. Also Earl of Avranches. Also called Hugh Lupus (wolf) and Hugh the Fat. Nephew of William I, sister married Count William d'Eu; daughter, Matilda, married Count Robert of Mortain. Virtual sovereign of Cheshire. Captured Anglesey from the Welsh, 1098; became so fat he could barely crawl; d. 1101. Holdings in 20 counties. [The Domesday Book, Crescent Books, New Jersey, 1995.]

---

Author: Cokayne, George E.
Periodical: The Complete Peerage
Publication: Sutton Publishing, Gloucestershire, 2000

Author: Hammond, Peter W.
Periodical: The Complete Peerage, Vol. XIV: Addenda and Corrigenda
Publication: Sutton Publishing, Gloucestershire, 1998

Title: Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans: Many of the English Ancestral Lines Prior to 1300 of those Colonial Americans with known Royal Ancestry but Fully Developed in all Possible Lines
Abbrev: Boyer, Med English Ancestors (2001)
Author: Compiled by Carl Boyer 3rd
Publication: Carl Boyer 3rd, PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322-0333,
2001
Page: p. 48, CHESTER 3
1055 Helisinde d'Avranches 1024 Agnes de Cornousille 1065 - 1136 Stephen of Brittany 71 71 Stephen, Count of Tréguier was son to Eudes, Count of Penthièvre and Agnes of Cornwall, sister of Hoel II, Duke of Brittany.

The title of Earl of Richmond appears to have been in existence in England a considerable time before it was held in accordance with any strict legal principle. Alan Le Roux (c. 1040-1089), was a Norman relative of Geoffrey of Brittany. He took part in William the Conqueror's invasion of England, and Le Roux obtained grants of land in various parts of England, including manors formerly held by Earl Edwin in Yorkshire. He built the castle of Richmond in one of these.

His brother Alan Le Noir, or Niger, (c. 1045-1093), succeeded to these estates on the former's death. Le Noir was in turn succeeded by Stephen (d. 1137), Count of Penthievre, who was either his son or another brother. These Breton counts were territorial lords of Richmond, and are often reckoned as 'earls of Richmond', though they were not so in the strict later sense.
(Wikipedia)

---

# Note: Founder (1110) Augustinian Abbey of St. Croix at Guincamp, Brittany, France.
# Note: Founder Cistercian Abbey of Begard, Brittany, France.
# Note: Held Honour of Richmond in England.

---

    STEPHEN, a count of Brittany, youngest son of Eudon,[a] succeeded his eldest brother, Geoffrey Boterel I, or Geoffrey's son Conan in the Breton lands, and his brother Alan the Black in the honor of Richmond in England, thus uniting all the possessions of the family, but he appears to have been out of possession of the honor of Richmond for a time during the reign of William II. In March 1101, he was a surety for Henry I for the observance of an alliance with Robert, Count of Flanders, and on 3 September 1101 at Windsor he witnessed charters of the King for Herbert, Bishop of Norwich, and for St. Peter's, Bath. On 30 October 1107 he executed at Lamballe a charter for the abbey of SS. Sergius and Bacchus at Angers, and in 1123 at Guingamp one for the abbey of St. Melaine at Rennes. He was a benefactor of the abbey of St. Mary, York, and in the period 1125-35 confirmed to that house gifts of churches, tithes and lands in Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire, and Norfolk, which formed part of the honor of Richmond. About the year 1110 he and his, wife founded the Augustinian abbey of Ste. Croix at Guingamp, and In 1130 he founded the Cistercian abbey of Bégard.
1055 - 1121 Ribald Fitzeudo 66 66 1040 - 1120 Bardolf FitzEudes 80 80 # Note:

    Although the surname of Fitz-Hugh was not appropriated to this family before the time of Edward III, it had enjoyed consideration from the period of the Conquest, when its ancestor, Bardolph, was Lord of Ravensworth, with divers other manors,
    in Richmondshire. This Bardolph assumed in his old age the habit of a monk in the Abbey of St. Mary, at York, to which he gave the churches of Patrick Brompton and Ravenswath, in pure alms. He was s. by his son and heir, Akaris Fitz-Bardolph.
    [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 207, FitzHugh, Barons FitzHugh]

# Note:
# Note: Title: Early Yorkshire Charters
# Note: Page: Vol VI, p 270
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 226-24
# Note: Text: Natural son of Eudes
1004 - 1055 Goda of England 51 51 # Note: Godgifu (married 2nd Eustace II, Count of Boulogne), sister of Edward the Confessor King of England and daughter of Ethelred II The Redeless by his 2nd wife Emma (daughter of Richard I, Duke of Normandy). [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 235-20
0880 - 0933 Richard de St. Sauveur 53 53 0880 Maud of Flanders 1150 - 1210 Maud St. Valery 60 60 D. 1215 Giles de Braose 1175 - 1211 William de Braose 36 36 1113 Hugh de Vernon 1030 - 1060 William de Vernon 30 30 1034 Emma Fitzosbern 1083 Alice de Vere 1154 Eleanor de Clare 1585 - 1643 James Wood 58 58 1608 - 1687 Ann Jager 79 79 Note:

    Horsley/Sankey
    http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:830664&id=I39340968

    http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1664046&id=I75644182
    http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2191914&id=I1073

1540 - 1608 William Cheney 68 68 Frances 1513 William Cheney 1510 Ann Holmes 1485 John Cheney 1423 - 1489 John Cheney 66 66 1425 Elizabeth Rempston 1455 - 1513 Thomas Cheney 58 58 1393 - 1461 Lawrence Cheney 68 68 1395 - 1422 Elizabeth Cokayne 27 27 # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 136-32
1365 - 1427 John Cokayne 62 62 # Note: Sir John Cokayne, of Hatley Cokayne, Beds; Chief Baron of the Exchequer. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 136-32
# Note: Text: 1427
1323 - 1388 Reynold De Grey 65 65 # Note: 2nd Lord Grey of Ruthin
# Note: had livery of the castle of Ruthin and the cantred
# Note: of Dyffryn Clwyd, and by gift of the King all the
# Note: issues of his father's lands since they were taken
# Note: into the King's hands, 20 Mar 1352/53[1]
# Note:
# Note: From: Therav3@aol.com (Therav3@aol.com)
# Note: Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
# Note: Date: 2002-09-16 21:19:33 PST
1331 - 1396 Alianore Le Strange 65 65 1290 - 1352 Roger De Grey 62 62 1355 Juliana Grey 1362 - 1441 Reginald de Grey 79 79 1420 - 1473 Elizabeth Cheney 53 53 1333 - 1373 John Cokayne 40 40 # Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
# Note: Text: no date, 1st husband
1344 Cecilia Vernon # Note: Cecilia; married 2nd Robert de Ireton, of Ireton Parva. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
# Note: Text: date implied by death of 1st husband ;no date, 1st husband ,Cecilia
1316 - 1332 John Cokayne 16 16 # Note: John Cokayne, of Ashbourne Hall; MP Derbys. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731 ,1332
1316 Lettice de Kniveton # Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
# Note: Text: no first name, daughter of Sir William Kniveton
1299 - 1323 William Cokayne 24 24 # Note:

    William Cokayne, of Ashbourne; born 1299; married Sarah, daughter of Adam/Alexander de Mercaston, of Mercaston, Derbys, and heiress of her brother Thomas de Mercaston of Ashbourne, and died 1323, leaving (John), with a younger son (Robert,
    married Elizabeth and had a son William and a daughter Elizabeth). [Burke's Peerage]

# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
1299 Sarah Mercaston 1274 Adam Mercaston # Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
1274 - 1298 Roger Cokayne 24 24 # Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
# Note: Text: living 1284, but had son born 1299
1275 Elizabeth 1244 William Cokayne # Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
1250 Alice de Dalbury 1219 - 1243 William Cokayne 24 24 # Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
1219 Sarah FitzAldecinder 1189 Adam FitzAldecinder 1169 Aldecinder 1194 - 1277 Andrew Cokayne 83 83 # Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
1169 John Cokayne # Note: John Cokayne, of Ashbourne; had (Andrew), with an elder son John of Ashbourne and Cokayne, Allesford, Essex (dspm after 1279), leaving a daughter and heiress who married Benedict de Cokefield. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
1150 John Cokayne # Note: John Cokayne, of Ashbourne, living 1150. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731
1225 - 1250 Hugh de Dalbury 25 25 1263 William de Kniveton # Note:

    This William, as he fits into the Kniveton pedigree seems to have been born a bit early to be the father of Lettice, who Burke's Peerage says married John Cokayne of Ashbourne (BP didn't state her first name, Lettice, just that she was a daughter of Sir William Kniveton of Bradley). It might be that William had a son William who held Bradley and was the father of Lettice (not likely because Bradley was next held by son Henry), or, as I stated in my notes on John Cokayne, BP has him born much later than he should be, which would make Lettice born much earlier as well. But, keeping BP's dates, I am forced to create a second wife for William's late-born daughter Lettice.

# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 731

1265 Isabel Wyther 1237 Henry Kniveton 1240 Joan 1219 - 1269 Matthew Kniveton 50 50 # Note: Between 1268-69 Haytrop de Osmaston and Richard f. Hervey de Stretton witnessed a deed under which Matthew de Kniveton held lands in Bradley.
# Note:
# Note: Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
# Note: Page: Gordon Kirkemo, 14 Apr 2003
1191 Matthew Kniveton 1163 Humfrid Kniveton 1135 Haslac Kniveton 1313 - 1346 William de Vernon 33 33 William (Sir); born 1312/3; married Margaret, daughter of Robert de Stopford. [Burke's Peerage]

------------------------

Sir William de Vernon, b. c 1313, d. by 1346, of Haddon, co. Derby, and Harlaston, Co. Stafford, said to have married Margaret, daughter of Robert de Stockport. [Ancestral Roots]

# Note:

    Note: This may not be a trivial matter of alternate spellings. Burke's states that William's ggggf Robert de Vernon had an elder brother, William married 1230 Margery, daughter of Sir Robert de Stockport. But maybe they both married daughters of Robert de Stockport--there was a Robert de Stockport, ancestor of this later Robert, who was of the appropriate time to be father of the Margery who married in 1230.

# Note:

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 63a-34

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 2884
1315 Margaret de Stockport # Note:

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 63a-34

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 2884
Text: Margaret de Stopford
1283 - 1322 Richard de Vernon 39 39 # Note: Richard (Sir); married Maud, daughter and coheir of William de Camville, 2nd Lord (Baron) Camville/Canville of the notional 24 June 1295 creation, and dvp by 3 Feb 1322/3. [Burke's Peerage]

---

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 63a-33

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 2884

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: III:4-5
1283 - 1342 Maud de Camville 59 59 1250 - 1330 Richard de Vernon 80 80 # Note:

    Richard (Sir), of Haddon; married 1st Alianore (dsp), daughter of Giles de Frenes; married 2nd Juliana, daughter of William de Vescy, of Alnwick, Northumberland, and Malton, Yorks, by Agnes, daughter of William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby of the 1138 creation, thus acquiring Arleston, Derbys. [Burke's Peerage]

---

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 63a-33

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 2884 Text: no date, 2nd wife

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: III:4-5
1253 Juliana de Vesci 1232 Richard de Vernon # Note: Richard (Sir); took name of Vernon by 1252; married Margaret de Vipont. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
1232 Margaret de Vipont 1203 - 1278 Gilbert le Franceys 75 75 # Note: Gilbert le Franceys, son of Adam le Franceys, son of John le Franceys, of Meaburn, Cumberland. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
1213 Hawise de Vernon # Note: Hawise; married 1231 Gilbert le Franceys, son of Adam le Franceys, son of John le Franceys, of Meaburn, Cumberland. [Burke's Peerage
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
1178 Adam le Franceys # Note: Adam le Franceys, son of John le Franceys, of Meaburn, Cumberland. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
1153 John le Franceys # Note: John le Franceys, of Meaburn, Cumberland. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2844
1213 Robert de Vernon # Note: Robert [3rd son, 2nd son was William, married 1230 Margery, daughter of Sir Robert de Stockport], of Nether Haddon, had a daughter and heiress. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
1155 - 1190 Richard de Vernon 35 35 # Note: Richard de Vernon; married 1171 Avice, daughter and coheir of William de Avenell, of Haddon, Derbys, and dvp. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
1155 Avice de Avenel # Note: Avice, daughter and coheir of William de Avenell, of Haddon, Derbys. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
1135 - 1190 Warin de Vernon 55 55 # Note: Grandson, Warine de Vernon succeeded his grandfather as Baron of Shipbrooke. Father of Richard de Vernon. [Does not name Warin other than calling him Baron of Shipbrooke.] [Burke's Peerage]
# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
# Note: Text: no first name, Baron of Shipbrooke
1137 Baliol 1165 Margaret de Vernon 1060 de Arbitot 1065 - 1130 Roger de Marmion 65 65 1105 Geoffrey Marmion Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: III:3 (d)Text: no parentage indicated,VIII:508
Text: places Geoffrey as brother of Robert and therefore son of Roger.
1120 Reginald de Baliol Matilda 1135 - 1188 Bernard de Baliol 53 53 1136 - 1225 Amabel de Baliol 89 89 1130 William de Avenel # Note: William de Avenell, of Haddon, Derbys. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
1205 - 1253 William de Vescy 48 48 # Note: William de Vescy, of Alnwick, Northumberland, and Malton, Yorks, by Agnes, daughter of William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby of the 1138 creation. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note:
# Note: ------------------------------------
# Note:
# Note:

    WILLIAM DE VESCY, son and heir, was a minor at his father's death. In January 1217/8 the custody of the whole de Vescy fee, with the heir and his marriage, was granted to William (Longespée), Earl of Salisbury, the King's uncle, to whom
    Margaret, Eustace's widow, was ordered to deliver her son, 13 November 1218. William had livery of his inheritance, 16 May 1226, when he was about to marry the Earl's daughter. He was knighted, circa May 1229, and accompanied Henry III's
    expedition to Brittany in 1230, being granted a protection while remaining in the King's service overseas, 15 September. In 1232 and 1234 he was forbidden to attend tournaments at Blyth, Northampton and Cambridge. He was deputed to escort King
    Alexander and Queen Joan of Scotland to the English court in 1235, and again in August 1237. In 1240 he was ordered not to retain in his service Siward, sometime professed in the order of Friars Preachers, nor to prevent his arrest. In 1242 he
    went with the King to Gascony. In December 1244. he was deputed, with the abbots of Alnwick and Byland, to receive the oath of Patrick and Walter Comyn, Earls in Scotland, to clear themselves towards the King. Next year he was in the Welsh
    campaign. On 30 May 1253 he had a protection, going with the King to Gascony. He was the founder of the Carmelite priory of Hulne, in Northumberland.

# Note:
# Note:

    He married, 1stly, shortly after 16 May 1226, Isabel, daughter of William (LONGESPEE), EARL OF SALISBURY, by Ela, only daughter and heir of William (OF SALISBURY, styled also FITZPATRICK), 2nd EARL OF WILTSHIRE, styled always EARL OF SALISBURY.
    She died s.p. and was buried in Alnwick Abbey. He married, 2ndly, before 1244, Agnes, 1st daughter of William (DE FERRERS), 5th EARL OF DERBY, by his 1st wife, Sibyl, sister and, in her issue, coheir of Anselm, 9th EARL OF PEMBROKE, 3rd
    daughter of William (MARSHAL), 4th EARL OF PEMBROKE. He died in Gascony, shortly before 7 October 1253, and was buried at Watton Priory, co. York. His widow died 11 May 1290, and was buried in the Greyfriars, at Scarborough. Complete Peerage
    XII/2:276-8

# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
# Note:
# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: XII/2:276-278
# Note: Text: had livery of his lands on 16 May 1226
1222 - 1290 Agnes de Ferrers 68 68 # Note: Agnes, daughter of William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby of the 1138 creation. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note:
# Note: ----------------------------------
# Note:
# Note:

    He [William de Vescy] married, 2ndly, before 1244, Agnes, 1st daughter of William (DE FERRERS), 5th EARL OF DERBY, by his 1st wife, Sibyl, sister and, in her issue, coheir of Anselm, 9th EARL OF PEMBROKE, 3rd daughter of William (MARSHAL), 4th
    EARL OF PEMBROKE. He died in Gascony, shortly before 7 October 1253, and was buried at Watton Priory, co. York. His widow died 11 May 1290, and was buried in the Greyfriars, at Scarborough. Complete Peerage XII/2:276-8

# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
# Note:
# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: XII/2:277-278
1268 - 1338 William de Camville 70 70 # Note: William de Camville, 2nd Lord (Baron) Camville/Canville of the notional 24 June 1295 creation, and dvp by 3 Feb 1322/3. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note:
# Note: ----------------------
# Note:
# Note:

    William de Camville, of Clifton Campville, Llanstephan, Fedamore, and Caher, son and heir, aged 40 and more at his father's death. He did homage and had livery of his inheritance, 3 Jan 1308/9. He was summoned for Military Service from 30 July
    1309 to 28 July 1317, and to Parliament 4 Mar 1308/9 and 16 June 1311, by writs directed Willelmo de Camvilla or Caumvilla. He d. shortly bef. 27 July 1338.

# Note:
# Note:

    He left 5 daughters and coheirs. (1) Maud, widow of Richard de Vernoun (son and heir apparent of Richard de Vernoun, of Haddon, co. Derby); he dvp before 3 Feb 1322/3. (2) Alianore, unmarried. (3) Isabel, wife of Gilbert de Bermingham. (4)
    Nicole, wife of John de Saint Clere. (5) Katherine, wife of Robert de Greseleye. Among their representatives any hereditary Barony, that may have supposed to have been created by the writ of 1295, is in abeyance. [Complete Peerage III:4-5]

# Note:
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 63a-32
# Note: Text: William de Canville
# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
# Note:
# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: III:4-5
1240 - 1308 Geoffrey Camville 68 68 # Note:

    Geoffrey de Canville or Camville, son and heir of William de Canville (d), of Clifton Campville, co. Stafford, Llanstephan, co. Carmarthen, Fedamore, co. Limerick, and Caher, co. Tipperary (who d. in 1260, before Michaelmas), by Lucy, his wife
    (living 14 Aug 1284). He was of age, but not yet a knight, before 20 June 1272. He was in the Army of West Wales in 1282, and was summoned for Military Service from 12 Dec 1276 to 21 June 1308, to attend the King wherever he might be, 8 June
    1294, to attend the King at Salisbury, 26 Jan 1296/7, and to Parliament from 24 June 1295 to 3 Nov 1306, by writs directed Galfrido de Caunvilla, Caumvilla, Canvilla, or Camvilla, whereby he is held to have become Lord Canville or Camville.

# Note:
# Note:

    He m. 1stly, Maud, widow of Nicholas Martin (son and heir apparent of Nicholas fitz Martin, of Cemais or Kemes, co Pembroke, and Blagdon, Somerset), daughter of Guy de Brian, of Laugharne, co. Carmarthen, by Eve (to whom she was heir), daughter
    and heir of Henry de Tracy, of Barnstaple, Devon. The King took his homage and they had livery of the lands of her grandfather, the said Henry de Tracy, 24 Sep 1274. She, who was b. 25 Dec 1242 (c), d. before Michaelmas 1279. He m. 2ndly, Joan.
    He d. shortly before 21 Sep 1308. His widow had livery of her inheritance in Ireland, 26 Oct 1308. [Complete Peerage III:3-4]

# Note:
# Note:

    (d) This William was 2nd son of Geoffrey de Canville, of Clifton (dead 1210), by his 2nd wife Leuca (d. 1236), granddaughter of William de Braiose. By his 1st wife, Felice (daughter of Philip de Worcester), from whom he was divorced on account
    of consanguinity, Geoffrey had also a son, Richard. The half-brothers had a long dispute about the manor of Clifton, which William claimed from Richard, and it was finally adjudged to him. Geoffrey was son and heir of William de Canville, by
    Auberee (living 1233), daughter and heir of Geoffrey Marmion, of Clifton, and of Arrow, co. Warwick. Auberee and her husband are stated by Dugdale and others to be the parents - instead of the great-grandparents - of the Geoffrey in the text.

# Note:
# Note: (c) But she was probably b. before this date, as her 1st son, William Martin is described as 25 and more in Mar 1281/2.
# Note:
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 63a-31
# Note: Text: Geoffrey de Canville or Camville ,1308
# Note:
# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: III:3-4Text: date implied by death of 1st wife , VIII:535
1210 - 1260 William de Camville 50 50 # Note:

    Geoffrey de Canville or Camville, son and heir of William de Canville (d), of Clifton Campville, co. Stafford, Llanstephan, co. Carmarthen, Fedamore, co. Limerick, and Caher, co. Tipperary (who d. in 1260, before Michaelmas), by Lucy, his wife (living 14 Aug 1284). [Complete Peerage III:3-4]

---

    (d) This William was 2nd son of Geoffrey de Canville, of Clifton (dead 1210), by his 2nd wife Leuca (d. 1236), granddaughter of William de Braiose. By his 1st wife, Felice (daughter of Philip de Worcester), from whom he was divorced on account of consanguinity, Geoffrey had also a son, Richard. The half-brothers had a long dispute about the manor of Clifton, which William claimed from Richard, and it was finally adjudged to him. Geoffrey was son and heir of William de Canville, by Auberee (living 1233), daughter and heir of Geoffrey Marmion, of Clifton, and of Arrow, co. Warwick. Auberee and her husband are stated by Dugdale and others to be the parents - instead of the great-grandparents - of the Geoffrey in the text.

---

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 63a-31
Text: 1260

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: III:3
Text: 1260, before Michaelmas.
1215 Lucy 1175 - 1219 Geoffrey de Camville 44 44 # Note:

    (d) . . . Geoffrey de Canville, of Clifton (dead 1210), by his 2nd wife Leuca (d. 1236), granddaughter of William de Braiose. By his 1st wife, Felice (daughter of Philip de Worcester), from whom he was divorced on account of consanguinity,
    Geoffrey had also a son, Richard. The half-brothers had a long dispute about the manor of Clifton, which William claimed from Richard, and it was finally adjudged to him. Geoffrey was son and heir of William de Canville, by Auberee (living
    1233), daughter and heir of Geoffrey Marmion, of Clifton, and of Arrow, co. Warwick. Auberee and her husband are stated by Dugdale and others to be the parents - instead of the great-grandparents - of the Geoffrey in the text. [Complete Peerage
    III:3 note (d)]

# Note:
# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: III:3 (d)
# Note: Text: no date, 2nd wife
1181 - 1236 Leuca de Braose 55 55 1145 William de Camville # Note:

    Geoffrey was son and heir of William de Canville, by Auberee (living 1233), daughter and heir of Geoffrey Marmion, of Clifton, and of Arrow, co. Warwick. Auberee and her husband are stated by Dugdale and others to be the parents - instead of
    the great-grandparents - of the Geoffrey in the text. [Complete Peerage III:3 note (d)]

1192 Thomas de Camville 1110 - 1190 Richard de Camville 80 80     Richard left issue, Richard, d. s. p.; Isabella, heiress of her brother, m. in the 4th of Richard I [1193], Richard Harcourt, of Bosworth, co. Leicester. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 100, Camville, Barons Camville, of Clifton]

---

    Third son of Richard de Camville, who founded Combe Abbey, in Warwickshire, and was son and heir of Gerard de Camville, Lord of Lilbourne, near Creek, in Northamptonshire. Isabel's mother was Milicent, cousin to King Henry I's second consort, Adeliza, daughter to Godfrey I, Duke of Brabant, who gave to the said Millicent, on her marriage with the said Richard Camville, the lordship of Stanton, in the county of Oxford, which was confirmed to her and her heirs by Kings Stephen and Henry II. [John Burke, History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. II, R. Bentley, London, 1834-1838, p. 221, Harcourt, of Ankerwycke]

---

    In the time of King Stephen, Richard de Camville was founder of Combe Abbey, co. Warwick, and was one of the witnesses in the 12th of the same reign [1147], to the convention between that monarch and Henry, Duke of Normandy, regarding the succession of the latter to the crown of England. This feudal lord appears to be a person of great power during the whole of King Henry's reign, and after the accession of Richard I, we find him one of the admirals in the expedition made by that monarch into the Holy Land. He was subsequently governor of Cyprus, whence he went without the king's permission to the siege of Acre and there died. His lordship left four sons and a dau., viz.,

---

# Note: I. Gerald, his heir,
# Note: II. Walter, left issue,
# Note: 1. Roger, who had an only dau. Matilda, m. to Nigel de Mowbray, and (dsp)
# Note: 1. Petronilla, m. to Richard Curzon.
# Note: 2. Matilda, m. to Thomas de Astley.
# Note: 3. Alicia, m. to Robert de Esseby.
# Note: III. Richard, left issue,
# Note: 1. Richard, (dsp)
# Note: 1. Isabella, heiress of her brother, m. Richard Harcourt, of Bosworth, co. Leicester.
# Note: IV. William, the youngest son, m. Albreda, dau. of Geoffrey Marmion, had issue,
# Note: 1. Geoffrey, his successor.
# Note: 2. William, of Sekerton, co. Warwick
# Note: 3. Thomas
# Note: V. Matilda, m. to William de Ros.
# Note:
# Note: [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 100, Camville, Barons Camville, of Clifton]

---

Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
Page: 127

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 246a-25, 84-26
1115 - 1155 Millicent de Stanton de Rethel 40 40 1144 - 1212 Gerald de Camville 68 68 1148 Walter de Camville 1085 Gerald de Camville # Note:

    In the 5th of King Stephen [1140], Gerald de Camville, of Lilburne Castle, co. Northampton, granted two parts of the tithes of Charleston-Camville in Somerset to the monks of Bermondsey, in Surrey. To this Gerald s. his son, Richard de Camville. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 100, Camville, Barons Camville, of Clifton]

Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
Page: 127
1117 Bernald de Saint Valery 1128 Eleanor de Domnart 1163 Laurette de Saint Valery 1167 Thomas de Saint Valery 1094 - 1166 Reginald de Saint Valery 72 72 Note: Title: Royalty for Commoners, by Stuart 1061 - 1099 Bernard de Saint Valery 38 38 1035 - 1097 Walter de Saint Valery 62 62 0977 - 1011 Gulbert de Saint Valery 34 34 # Note: Protector of Monastery of Fecamp
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 177-3
1005 - 1066 Bernarad de Saint Valery 61 61 1008 Richard de Hugleville 0947 Bernard de Saint Valery 0950 Emma de Saint Valery 0929 Renaud de Saint Valery 1225 - 1307 Guy de Briene 82 82 # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 63a-30
# Note: Text: Guy de Brian
# Note:
# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: III:4
# Note:
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 63a-30
1254 Guy de Briene 1202 - 1252 Guy de Briene 50 50 1202 Jane de la Pole 1170 Guy de Briene 1139 Guy de Brienne de Bar-Sur-Seine 1110 - 1159 Guy de Brienne de Bar-Sur-Seine 49 49 Guy, Count of Bar; married Peronelle, daughter of Anseri de Chacenay, Baron of Chacenay in Champagne. [Burke's Peerage]
1115 Petronille de Chacenay 1075 - 1125 Milon de Brienne de Bar-Sur-Seine 50 50 1095 - 1116 Maud de Noyers 21 21 1070 - 1104 Milo de Noyers 34 34 1074 Anna 1045 - 1078 Milo de Noyers 33 33 1087 - 1137 Anseric de Chacenay 50 50 # Note: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 226
1092 Humberline de Troyes 1062 Milon de Chacenay 1065 Adelaide 1039 Anseric de Chacenay 1040 Gersinde 1065 Tescelin Sorus de Fontaines 1069 Aleth de Montbard 1044 Bernard de Montbard 1048 Humberge 1168 William de Pola 1130 Nicholas de Pola 1105 Nicholas de Pola 1080 William de Pola 1200 - 1274 Henry de Tracy 74 74 # Note: Henry; living 1230. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2758
# Note:
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 63a-29
# Note:
# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: III:4
# Note:
# Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 133
# Note: Text: 1272
1196 Maude de Braose 1175 - 1210 Oliver de Tracy 35 35 # Note: Oliver; living 1201-04. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note:
# Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 133
# Note:
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 63a-29
# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2758
1137 Henry de Tracy # Note: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2758
1142 Hawise 1133 - 1224 William de Tracy 91 91 # Note: Note: He was one of the four knights who assassinated Thomas à Becket in 1170.
# Note: Event: Crime 1170 Canterbury
# Note:
# Note:

    Sir William de Tracy, 2nd son of Grace de Tracy and husband John de Sudeley, lived in the reign of Henry II, and held lands of his brother, Ralph de Sudeley, by one knight's fee. This holding was the Manor of Toddington, for it appears by  "Doomesday Book" that it was held by the Lord Sudeley, of the Manor of Sudeley, and, in the reign of Edward I, the Tracys are expressly said to be possessed of it; and this William, in a deed of Otwell, Lord of Sudeley, son and heir of the said Ralph is called his uncle. Sir William was one of the four knights who, in 1170, at the instigation of King Henry II, assassinated Thomas a'Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury. Fuller, in his 'Worthies of England', names the assassin as 'Sir  William Tracy, of Toddington", and describes him as "a man of high birth, state and stomach, a favorite of the king's, and his daily attendant". In the 19th year of the reign of Henry II (1171), he was created "Justiciary" of Normandy, and we know that for a time he performed the duties of that office, for he was present at Falaise in 1174, when William, King of Scotland, did homage to Henry II, and in 1176 he was succeeded in his office by the Bishop of Winchester. Subsequently, Sir William returned to England. During the reign of King John, he appeared in arms against his sovereign with the other rebellious barons, and in consequence his lands were confiscated by the crown. At the beginning of the reign of Henry III, however, these lands were restored to him, as is shown by a roll, dated at Westminster, 11-18, 2nd year of the reign of Hanry III (1218). During the latter psrt of his life he seems to have repented of the murder of the archbishop, for he founded and endowed a chapel to "Thomas a'Becket" in the Conventual Church at Tewkesbury.

# Note:

    "There exists a generally received tradition", writes the Dutchess of Cleveland, "that he retired to his estates in the West of England, where he lived a private life, when the wind and weather turned against him; and according to the local history of his native County of Gloucester, reached the good old age of ninety. His residence was at Morthoe, close to Woollacomb Bay, and the worthy folk of Devonshire aver that his tormented spirit may, even now, be heard moaning and lamenting on the Woollacomb sands, where it is doomed to wander restlessly to and fro, toiling to 'make bundles of sand and wisps of the same' for all time to come. He was, it is said, buried at Morthoe, where an effigy, by some believed to be his, remains in the church."

# Note: One of his daughter m. Sir Gervase Courtenay, and one of their sons, Oliver, living in 1184, assumed the family name of his mother - de Tracy.
1135 Hawise de Born 1175 Jane de Tracy 1087 - 1140 John de Sudeley 53 53 # Note: John de Sudeley; living 1130; married Grace, daughter of William de Tracy (died c1136), illegitimate son of Henry I, late in whose reign he died. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note:
# Note: Note: Ancestral Roots, in line 222, which used to have Grace as daughter of William, now states that she is of "parentage unknown" because William de Tracy had no daughter named Grace. I have her of Henry based on World Connect sources.
# Note: -----------------------------------------------
# Note:
# Note:

    John, the elder son, assumed his surname from Sudeley, the chief seat which he inherited, becoming John de Sudeley. He m. Grace, dau. and heir of Henry de Traci, feudal Lord of Barnstaple, and had issue, Ralph and William. He was s. by his elder son. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 520, Sudeley, Barons Sudeley]

# Note:
# Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 133
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 235-23
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2757
1090 Grace de Tracy # Note: Grace, daughter of William de Tracy (died c1136), illegitimate son of Henry I, late in whose reign he died. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note:
# Note: -------------------------
# Note:
# Note:

    GRACE DE TRACY, parentage unknown; m. by 1130, JOHN DE SUDELEY (235-23), of Sudeley Castle and Toddington, co. Gloucester, appears in the 1130 pipe roll. (Atikins, 'Gloucestershire 369'; 'VCH Warwick' V 70; 'Hist. Mon. St. Peter, Clouc.', ii
    180; Sanders, 85-86).

# Note:

    Note: Grace is given in all standard sources as the dau. & h. of William de Tracy of Devonshire. However, recent research reveals that William de Tracy, d. ca. 1135, was succeeded in his lands by 1165 by another William de Tracy who was
    apparently his son. This second William de Tracy was not Grace's son as commonly claimed even though she had a son with this name. Grace's son William de Tracy was an adult by the 1140s, and he seems to have held only the manor of Toddington,
    co. Gloucester, of the honour of Sudeley. Chronology suggests that Grace herself was likely of the same generation as King Henry's bastard son, William de Tracy. In any event, she was probably not William's daughter and certainly not his heir.
    [Ancestral Roots]

# Note:
# Note: Note: Some posts to soc.genealogy.medieval state that Grace's father was Henry, lord of Barnstaple, Devon, by 1130.
# Note:
# Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 133
# Note:
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 222-27, 235-23
# Note:
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2757
1114 Ralph de Sudeley 1057 - 1115 Harold de Sudeley 58 58 # Note: Harold de Sudeley; in the Domesday Survey 1086 is recorded as holding Burton Dasset, Warwicks, and land in Droitwich, Worcs, as well as patrimony; granted land in Sudleley to Winchcombe Abbey. [Burke's Peerage]
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 255-25, 235-22
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2757
1072 Maud d'Avranches 1026 - 1057 Ralph Hereford 31 31 1028 Gytha 1012 - 1035 Dreux Vexin 23 23 1076 Geva d'Avranches 1074 - 1094 Helga de Kevelioc 20 20 1072 - 1120 Robert FitzHugh 48 48 Robert, the natural son of Hugh Lupus, 1st Earl of Chester, died without male issue, and it is agreed by all parties and the best authorities that he had two daughters: Letitia, who was the wife of Richard Patric, whose descendant carried one moiety of Malpus on down to Hugh Sutton. Mabilia,the other co-heiress, was wife of William Belward. From this period to the commencement of the inquisitions, the descent of the Malpus share of the Barony, is preserved by deeds and by pleas relative to the contest between the rightful heirs.
1070 - 1130 Henry de Tracy 60 60 # Note: Henry's place of orgiin in Normandy is given by Loyd, as well as his possession of Barnstaple by 1130. Loyd does not state that Henry was father of Grace, but Grace was certainly connected with Barnstaple.
# Note:
# Note: Title: The Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families, by Lewis C Loyd, 1999
# Note: Page: 104-106
1155 Matthew de Torrington 1134 - 1170 William de Torrington 36 36 1109 William de Torrington 1086 Robert Torrington 1067 Roger Torrington 1285 Robert de Stockport # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 63a-34
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2884
# Note: Text: Robert de Stopford
1260 - 1292 Richard Stockport 32 32 Note: vol 3, pg 795, Ormerod's "History of Cheshire" 1278 - 1316 Cicely de Eaton 38 38 1290 Joan de Stockport 1239 - 1272 Robert Stockport 33 33 Note: vol 3, pg 795, Ormerod's "History of Cheshire" 1240 - 1293 Elen de Maubanc 53 53 1198 - 1249 Robert de Stockport 51 51 Note: vol 3, pg 795, Ormerod's "History of Cheshire" 1225 Roese de Venables 1243 Margaret Stockport 1160 - 1206 Robert de Stockport 46 46 # Note: vol 3, pg 795, Ormerod's "History of Cheshire"
# Note:
# Note:

    The second Sir Robert de Stockport played a part in the development of the town the direct consequences of which lasted over 600 years. Around the year 1220 he obtained a Charter (pictured above) from the Earl of Chester, Randle III, called Randle the Good, which granted the burgesses of Stockport the right to elect their own mayor, without interference from their Earl or Baron. Despite challenges and attempts to subvert it, that Charter, with only few changes served as the basis of local government in Stockport until the 1835 Municipal Corporation Act swept away such ancient traditions and privileges, and gave England and Wales a uniform pattern of local authorities.

# Note: http://www.stockport.gov.uk/Borough/Heritage/
1180 Matilda Banastre 1130 Robert FitzWaltherof # Note:

    His father may have been Geoffrey, Baron of Stockport in Cheshire at the time of Domesday, Geoffrey being a son of Ivon, a nobleman of Normandy and brother to Nigell of Cheshire; Odard, Lord of Dutton in Cheshire; Edward, Lord of Haselwall in Cheshire; Horswyn, Lord of Shrigley in Cheshire; and Wolfaith, Lord of Hatton in Cheshire.

# Note:
# Note: History and Antiquities of the County of Northampton. Baker, George, 2 vols., J.B. Nichols, London, 1822-1841. Vol. I, p. 196
1142 - 1192 Robert de Banastre 50 50 Note: 1164-7 Built Prestatyn Castle, Denbighshire, Wales 1172 Robert de Banastre 1108 - 1154 Thurstan de Banastre 46 46 1155 Margery de Banastre 1057 Thurstan de Banastre 1030 - 1128 Robert de Banastre 98 98 Sources:
Title: Public Member Trees
Author: Ancestry.com
Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.Original data - Family trees submitted by Ancestry members.Original data: Family trees submitted by Ancestry members.
Note:
This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.
Note: Information extracted from various family tree data submitted to Ancestry and The Generations Network
Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=3997&pid=-1937120543 
1211 - 1261 Roger de Venables 50 50 1212 Alice Peninton 1190 Alan de Peninton 1180 Agnes de Longerville 1235 William de Venables
Sir William Venables died 20 of Edward I (1292). His name appears on several deeds, the first of which bears the date of 1267. He married Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas Dutton. He restored to the monks of Chester the advowson of Astbury, of which his father had despoiled them, and died the year following. He was married in 1253 and had Hugh, Sir William and a daughter, Cecelia.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 307)

---

Sources:

   1. Title: Public Member Trees
      Author: Ancestry.com
      Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.Original data - Family trees submitted by Ancestry members.Original data: Family trees submitted by Ancestry members.
      Note:
      This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.
      Page: Ancestry Family Trees
      Note:
      Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=5257601&pid=-954001781 
1191 - 1249 Hugh de Venables 58 58 Note: Married (1) Wenthliam, divorced. She had numerous children, not certain which was mother of Roger. 1193 Alice de Oxton 1175 - 1228 William de Venables 53 53 # Note: Letitia, 2nd daughter and coheir of Sir William Venables, of Wymincham
# Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
# Note: Page: 2631
1150 Gilbert de Venables 1130 Gilbert de Venables 1105 Gilbert de Venables 1085 Gilbert de Venables 1112 Hamon de Legh 1147 Amabilia de Venables 1130 Waltheof FitzWolfric de Hatton # Note: Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
# Note: Page: Kay Allen, 8 Jun 1999
1089 Wolfric de Hatton # Note: Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
# Note: Page: Kay Allen, 8 Jun 1999
# Note: Text: no parents given for Wolfric
1054 Wolfaith de Hatton Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
Page: Adrian Channing, 25 May 1999
Text: Ivo's 6th son
1080 William Hatton 1170 Randulph de Oxton 1258 - 1323 John de Grey 65 65 # Note:

    NOTE: The two wives of John Grey indicated below in BP & CP have been disproved as mothers by Douglas Richardson. I leave the references & wives for historical purposes (Douglas Richardson leaves open the possibility that one or both were
    actually wives of John), but have changed the children to be of Eleanor de Bohun. Douglas Richardson specifically states that all three of these children's mother was Maud de Vernun. Originally Roger was son of Maud Basset, Henry & Joan
    children of Anne Ferrers.

# Note:
# Note: -----------------------------------------
# Note:
# Note:

    John de Grey, 2nd Lord (Baron) Grey (of Wilton); born c1268; had granted 1311 Ruthin Castle to himself for life then to his younger son Roger; at Battle of Bannockburn 1314; Justiciar of North Wales Feb 1314/5; married 1st allegedly Anne,
    daughter of Sir William Ferrers, of Groby, Leics, and had issue; married 2nd Maud, allegedly daughter of Sir Ralph Basset, of Drayton, Staffs, and died 28 Oct 1323. [Burke's Peerage]

# Note:
# Note: -----------------------------------------
# Note:
# Note: BARONY OF GREY OF WILTON (II)
# Note:
# Note:

    JOHN (DE GREY), LORD GREY (of Wilton), son and heir, aged 40 and more at his father's death. On 5 May 1308 he had livery of his father's lands, his homage being respited, the escheator South of Trent being ordered to take his fealty. By his
    charter, dated 7 April 1310, he founded a collegiate church at Ruthin. On 18 Nov 1311 he had licence to convey the castle of Ruthin, the cantred of Dyffryn Clwyd, and the manor of Rushton, co. Chester, to himself for life, with remainder to
    Roger his son in tail general, remainder to his own right heirs. He was at the battle of Bannockburn, 24 June 1314. On 19 February 1314/5 he was appointed Justiciar of North Wales and Keeper of the King's castles and lands in those parts,
    during pleasure: his successor, Roger de Mortemer of Chirk, was appointed, 23 Nov 1316. He was summoned for Military Service from 21 June 1308 to 3 April 1323, to Councils from 8 Jan 1308/9 to 30 May 1324, and to Parliament from 4 March 1308/9
    to 18 September 1322, by writs directed Johanni de Grey. He accompanied the King to France in June 1320, and to Scotland in August 1322.

# Note:
# Note:

    He married, 1stly (it is said), Anne, daughter of Sir William DE FERRERS, of Groby, co. Leicester, by his 1st wife, Anne, daughter of Sir Hugh LE DESPENSER, of Ryhall, Rutland, Loughborough, co. Leicester, Parlington, co. York, &c. He married,
    2ndly, Maud, who is said to have been daughter of Sir Ralph BASSET, of Drayton, co. Stafford, by Margaret, daughter of Sir Roger DE SOMERY, of Dudley, co. Worcester. He died 28 October, and was buried circa 18 November 1323. [Complete Peerage
    VI:173-4, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

# Note:
# Note: --------------------------------------------
# Note: Following is an e-mail to the soc.genealogy.medieval
# Note: from Douglas Richardson (thanks to Dave Utzinger)
# Note: This changes all of John's wives & must be evaluated.
# Note: --------------------------------------------
# Note:
# Note: royalancestry@msn.com (Douglas Richardson) wrote in message news:<5cf47a19.0201151600.4392e754@posting.google.com>...
# Note: Dear Newsgroup ~
# Note:
# Note:

    In the wake of the new discovery of Theobald de Verdun's wife, Margery de Bohun, new attention has been turned to the baronial families of Verdun and Bohun. As indicated by Complete Peerage, Theobald de Verdun's step-mother, Eleanor, 2nd wife
    of John de Verdun, is thought to have been a Bohun, she having sealed with those arms as reported by Complete Peerage sub Verdun. Chris Philips reported his findings on this matter in a post today.

# Note:
# Note:

    As it turns out, Eleanor, 2nd wife of John de Verdun, does in fact appear to have been a Bohun. My research indicates that Eleanor evidently had as her maritagium the manor of Debden, Essex (a Bohun manor), which property she in turn conveyed
    as a widow in 1275/6 to John de Grey, of Wilton, co. Hereford, and his wife, Maud. The fine conveying this property is found in Essex Feet of Fines, vol. 2, pg. 13. At his death years later, John de Grey is stated to have held the manor of
    Debden of Eleanor de Verdun by the service of a rose, the standard service for property granted in marriage in this period (see Cal. IPM, vol. 6, pg. 311). As such, it seems rather clear that John de Grey's wife, Maud, was the daughter of John
    de Verdun, by his 2nd wife, Eleanor de Bohun.

# Note:
# Note:

    We can be reasonably certain that Maud de Grey was Eleanor de Verdun's daughter, as Eleanor being a Bohun surely had the manor of Debden in marriage, and in turn passed it along to her daughter, Maud. In this time period, a woman's maritagium
    almost always fell to her descendants, unless she happened to be childless, when she sometimes conveyed it away to strangers. In Eleanor's case, we know that she had several other male children, so the odds that she would convey her maritagium
    to the Grey family without there being a kinship is virtually slim to none. Also, it appears that John de Grey and his wife, Maud, were small children at the time of Eleanor de Verdun's fine. Complete Peerage indicates that John de Grey was
    born about 1268 (he being aged 40 at his father's death in 1308). Eleanor de Verdun's other known child, Humphrey, was born in 1267. It would be odd for Eleanor to convey her property to children, unless of course one of the parties was her own
    child.

# Note:
# Note:

    Following John de Grey's death, the manor of Debden, Essex was in turn held by John and Maud de Grey's son and heir, Henry de Grey, Lord Grey, of Wilton (see Cal. IPM, vol. 8, pg. 261), as well as by a later Henry Grey, Lord Grey, of Wilton
    (see Cal. IPM, vol. 17, pg. 253). At the later Henry de Grey's death, he is stated to hold the manor of "Weldebernys" in Debden of the Countess of Hereford (a Bohun descendant). The passage of this manor down to John de Grey's son, Henry, and
    thence to his heirs gives evidence that Henry was in fact the son of John de Grey's wife, Maud de Verdun.

# Note:
# Note:

    These new discoveries causes a ripple of corrections for Complete Peerage as well as for the Plantagenet Ancestry manuscript. For starters, it now appears that John de Grey had but one wife, Maud de Verdun, not two as claimed by Complete
    Peerage. Also, it appears Maud de Verdun was the mother of all of John de Grey's children, presumably including Iseult Saint Pierre, living 1343, whose existence and identity I mentioned in a post this past week.

# Note:
# Note:

    As soon as I have time, I will post copies of the specifics of the fines and inquisitions which show the links between the Bohun, Verdun, and Grey families. I will also post a list of the colonial immigrants who descend from this
    Bohun-Verdun-Grey combination. I haven't checked my lists yet, but I'm sure this set of discoveries will change many people's charts here on the newsgroup. Perhaps if John Ravilious has a moment, he can post a tabular pedigree chart showing the
    descent.

# Note:
# Note:

    As for the identity of parentage of Eleanor de Bohun, Complete Peerage indicates that she married before 1267 to John de Verdun, and that they had a son, Humphrey de Verdun, born in 1267. If we assume that Eleanor was around 20 at the time of
    marriage, say 1265, the chronology would place Eleanor, born say 1245, as a hitherto unknown daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford (died 1275), by his 2nd wife, Maud de Avenbury. The date of the marriage of Earl Humphrey and Maud de
    Avenbury is not known, but presumably it was soon after the death of his 1st wife, Maud of Eu, which took place in 1241. Earl Humphrey and Maud are known to have had children, but no modern descendants have been found for this couple.

# Note:
# Note:

    If anyone has any further particulars which would shed additional light on this matter, I would appreciate hearing from them at my e-mail address below. In closing, I wish to thank John Ravilious, Chris Phillips and Cristopher Nash for their
    continued helpful posts on the Mortimer, Verdun, Bohun and Grey families. Yes, answers can be found to ancient questions. Collegiality is the one of the keys to finding those answers.

# Note:
# Note: Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah
# Note:
# Note: E-mail: royalancestry@msn.com
# Note:
# Note: -----------------------------------------------------
# Note:
# Note: From: Douglas Richardson (royalancestry@msn.com)
# Note: Subject: Re: Eleanor de Verdun, and her daughter, Maud, wife of John de Grey, of Wilton
# Note: View: Complete Thread (6 articles)
# Note: Original Format
# Note: Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
# Note: Date: 2002-01-17 07:27:30 PST
# Note:
# Note:
# Note: Dear Newsgroup ~
# Note:
# Note:

    Yesterday I spent further time researching the published literature regarding the topic of the marriages of John de Grey, 2nd Lord Grey of Wilton (died 1323). My research indicates that the original source for John de Grey's two marriages to
    Anne de Ferrers and Maud Basset is the 1619 Visitation of Leicester, published in 1870, as Harleian Society Publications, vol. 2, pg. 74. As best I can determine, this particular visitation is wildly inaccurate. Out of five marriages reported
    for various Lord Greys of Wilton in this pedigree, I can only document one of them. Of the other four, evidence exists to prove that one is incorrect, one is unlikely, and two probably never took place. Moreover, the pedigree overlooked John de
    Grey's marriage to Maud de Verdun, for which marriage I found solid evidence this past week. Needless to say, as a general rule, visitations are usually more accurate than this.

# Note:
# Note:

    I found all published sources I consulted to have followed the 1619 Visitation of Leicester in lockstep, with one exception. The exception was Thomas Blore's History and Antiquities of the County of Rutland, published 1811, pp. 164-165.
    Following the 1619 Visitation of Leicester, Blore stated John de Grey married (1st) Anne de Ferrers, by whom he had his eldest son, Henry (ancestor of the later Lords Grey of Wilton). He varied from the visitation when he stated that John de
    Grey married (2nd) "Matilda, daughter of John de Verdun, Constable of Ireland," by whom he had his younger son, Roger (ancestor of the later Lords Grey of Ruthin). Unfortunately, Blore gave no sources for his Grey pedigree, so it is unknown
    where he found a record of John de Grey's marriage to Maud de Verdun.

# Note:
# Note:

    Blore withstanding, it appears that Maud de Verdun was the mother of at least three of John de Grey's children, they being both sons, Henry and Roger (who reportedly shared their mother's maritagium at Debden, Essex), and at least one daughter,
    Joan, wife of Ralph Basset. I find no evidence whatsoever that John de Grey was ever married to an Anne de Ferrers.

# Note:
# Note:

    Beyond this, William Harvey's History and Antiquities of the Hundred of Willey, pg. 318, states that there is a pedigree of the Grey family found in Harl. MS. 110, fo. 31, with a shield of 16 quarters, as follows: 1 Grey, 2 Glanvile, 3
    Fitzhugh, 4 Longchamp, 5 De la vach, 6 Grey, 7 Hastings, 8 Cantilupe, 9 Scote, 10 Bruse, 11 Brewer, 12 Valence, 13 Manchany, 14 Marshall, 15 Fitzosbert, 16 Hastings. I have not seen this particular pedigree but it may well worth someone's time
    to examine. It should be available at the British Library in the London area. This pedigree appears to be different from the 1619 Visitation of Leicester, as the 1619 pedigree provided only eight arms in the Grey quarterings, not sixteen.

# Note:
# Note: Lastly, regarding the terminology, "it is said," the late Dr. David Faris told me that those words are used in Complete Peerage when the sole source for a marriage is a visitation pedigree, for whom no independant verification has been found.
# Note:
# Note: Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah
# Note:
# Note: E-mail: royalancestry@msn.com
1260 Maud de Verdun # Note: Following excerpted from a posting to soc.genealogy.medieval newsgroup:

From: Douglas Richardson (royalancestry@msn.com)
Subject: Maud de Verdun, wife of John de Grey, 2nd Lord Grey of Wilton
Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
Date: 2002-02-13 22:42:27 PST

    I should add that when I first posted my discovery of the 1276/7 fine, I was of the impression that John and Maud de Grey were small children when the fine was recorded. I held this view because Complete Peerage stated that John was said to be aged 40 at the time of his father's death in 1308, or born about 1268. However, it now appears that that John was actually closer to age 50 in 1308, which is indicated by John's first appearance as an adult in the records in the late 1270's, as shown by Moor's Knights of Edward I. I have also since located the Grey pedigree in Blore's History of Rutland which states that John de Grey married Maud, daughter of John de Verdun. Since Blore never saw the fine below, it would appear he relied on another source for the marriage of John and Maud de Grey.

best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

E-mail: royalancestry@msn.com
1282 - 1342 Henry de Grey 60 60 HENRY (DE GREY), LORD GREY (of Wilton), son and heir, born 28 October 1281 or 1282. On 23 July 1324 the King took his homage and fealty, and he had livery of his father's lands. He was in Scotland with the King in 1322. In August he was staying in Gascony on the King's service: he accompanied the King to the North in June 1327, and was about to go beyond seas In April 1331. He was summoned for Military Service from 24 July 1322 to 27 March 1335, to Councils from 30 December 1324 to 20 November 1342, and to Parliament from 10 October 1325 to 3 March 1340/1, by writs directed Henrico de Grey. On 10 July 1337 he had licence to convey the castle and manor of Wilton, the manors of Purleigh, Easton Grey, Eaton, and Waterhall, co. Bucks, &c., to himself for life, with remainder to Reynold his son, in fee. On the same day, on account of his infirmity, he had exemption from serving the King in war, and from attendance at Parliaments or Councils.

He married (it is said) Anne, daughter and heir of Ralph DEROCKLEY, by Isabel, daughter of William DE CLARE. He died 10 or 16 December 1342, aged 60 or 61. [Complete Peerage VI:175, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

---

Sources:
Title: AFN:
Abbrev: AFN:
Title: Tudor Place
Abbrev: Tudor Place
Author: Jorge H. Castelli
Title: Horrocks, Philips, Winget, Keeler, Clark, Watson, Lockwood, Strong, Gates and ancestors
Abbrev: Horrocks, Philips, Winget, Keeler, Clark, Watson,
Author: Lloyd A. Horocks
Title: The Phillips, Weber, Kirk and Staggs Family
Abbrev: The Phillips, Weber, Kirk and Staggs Family
Author: Jim Weber
1240 - 1302 Maud de Longchamp 62 62 1221 Joane Peyvre 1246 Hawise de Grey 1176 - 1219 Henry de Grey 43 43 # Note:

    ISOLDA, who married Henry de Grey, of Codnovre, unto whom King Richard I. in the sixth year of his reign (1194), gave the manor of Turrock, in Essex, which King John Confirmed; and by his Publick Charter vouchsafed to him a Special privilege, viz.: to hunt the Hare and Fox in any Lands belonging to the Crown, excepting the King's own Demesn-Parks. Which Henry, in 1 Henry III. (1216), had also a Grant of the Mannor of Grimston, in Nottinghamshire (part of the possessions of Robert Bardolf), for his Support in the King's Service. And having afterwards married Isolda, Niece and Co-heir to the Same Robert, in 9 Henry III. (1224), shared in the Inheritance in all his Lands.

# Note:
# Note:

    In the 6th year of King Richard I [1195], that monarch conferred the manor of Thurrock, co. Essex (afterwards called Thurrock Grey), upon Henry de Grey, which grant was confirmed by King John, who vouchsafed, by special charter, to permit the said Henry de Grey to hunt the hare and fox in any land belonging to the crown, save the king's own demesne-parks. In the 1st Henry III [1216], he had also a grant of the manor of Grimston, co. Nottingham, and having afterwards m. Isolda, niece and heiress of Robert Bardolf, shared in the inheritance of his lands. By this lady Henry de Grey had issue, Richard, John, William, Robert, Walter, and Henry. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 247-248, Grey, Baron Grey, of Codnor, co. Derby]

# Note:
# Note:

    Sir Henry de Grey was in great favour with Richard, Coeur de Lion, as is manifested by the grant which that prince made to him of the manor of Turrock, in Essex, afterwards called Thurrock Grey, whereof also he had a confirmation by King John, with whom he continued in great estimation. In 8th of Richard I, William de Brewere, Sheriff, gave account of 100 s. of Henry de Grey scutage for 5 knights' fees, because he was in the King's service beyond the sea. In 1st of Henry III, 1216, he had a grant of the manor of Grimston, County Nottingham, from Robert Bardolph, for his support of the King's service. This Robert Bardolph died 9th of Henry III, 1225, when the said Henry Grey, having married Isolda Bardolph, daughter of Hugh and niece of the said Robert, shared with Maud Bardolph and others all the lands of the said Robert. They had six sons; Richard, whose principal seat was at Codnor, County Derby, John, Justice of Chester, ancestor of the Greys of Ruthven and Wilton, William, of Nottingham and Derby, Robert, of Rotherfield, Walter, Archbishop of York, and Henry

1182 - 1246 Isolda de Bardolf 64 64 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 1226
Text: date implied by death of 1st husband.
1200 - 1271 Richard de Grey 71 71 Richard de Grey, of Codnor; Warde Guernsey and Jersey 1226 and 1254, Sheriff of Essex and Herts 1239, Steward of Gascony c1248 and 1253; sided with Simon de Montfort in the Baron's War 1258 on; Keeper of Dover Castle on behalf of the baronial party, Keeper of Rochester after Battle of Lewes 1264; later taken prisoner by Henry III and his lands were confiscated but these were shortly afterwards restored to him. [Burke's Peerage] 1206 Robert de Grey 1202 Hugh de Grey 1150 - 1198 John de Grey 48 48 1175 Agnes Grey 1152 Basset 1172 Eve de Grey 1135 Anchitel de Grey 1139 Eva Redvers 1164 - 1242 Eva de Grey 78 78 1110 Richard de Grey 1114 Mabilia 1170 Henry de Grey 1085 Anschetil de Grey 1060 Anschetil de Grai # Note: Anschetil, whose origin is to be sought in Greye-sur-mer, had in Oxfordshire at the time of the Domesday Survey a considerable holding, which included Rotherfield. [Complete Peerage VI:150 note]
# Note:
# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: VI:150
1033 John de Grai John, Lord Grey of Groy, married Adela, daughter and co-heir of William FitzOsbert, son of Robert Crispin, Earl of Hereford, whose arms were: Gules a bend argent, over all a fesse or. Robert Crispin's wife was Aldreda, daughter of Ralph de Yvery, whose arms were: Or, three chevronels gules. In Howard's lately published "Life of L. J. Grey," the descent of this family is from Rollo to Sir Henry Grey of Turroc.

1050 - 1156 Adeliza FitzOsbern 106 106 1030 - 1071 William FitzOsbern 41 41 Alice [de Toeni] married William fitz Osbern, 1st Earl of Hereford, of the creation made shortly after the Conquest. [Burke's Peerage]

-----------------------------

William Fitz Osbern, a Companion of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings, 1066, Earl of Hereford. [Ancestral Roots]

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 1378, 2680

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 53-25, 163-23

Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
Page: 100
Text: 1071
1059 - 1095 Emma FitzOsbern 36 36 1000 - 1040 Osbern de Crepon 40 40 # Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 100
0997 Emma Albreda de Ivry 0950 Cyrid 0960 Albreda 0970 - 1015 Ralph de Toeni 45 45 # Note: Ralph/Rodulf de Toeni; feudal Lord also of Conches; custodian with his son of Castle of Tillieres from 1013 to 1014; took part in Norman expedition to Southern Italy c1015. [Burke's Peerage]

# Note:

    RALPH (or RODULF) DE TOENI II, son and heir, was born probably before 970, for in 1013 or 1014 the Duke of Normandy, having founded the castle of Tilliéres, gave the custody of it to Ralph de Toeni and his son Roger, together with Neel, Vicomte of the Cotentin. Ralph was seigneur of Tosni and Conches. ) About 1015 he went to Apulia; and in the winter of 1015-16 he was at the siege of Salerno (a). The name and parentage of his wife are unknown, but it is possible that she belonged to a collateral branch of the ducal house; for according to Orderic, Ralph's son Roger descended from an alleged uncle of Rolf, the founder of Normandy (b). The date of Ralph's death is not known. [Complete Peerage XII/1:754-5, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

# Note:

    (a) "Chron. Mon. Casinensis" (in one MS, only) in Mon. Germ. Hist., vol ix (vol vii Scriptorum), p. 652, note (a); F. Chalondon, La Domination normande en Italie, vol i, pp. 49, 52; cf. Douglas, op. cit. p. 30, note 127. He may be the "quidam Normannorum audacissimus, nomine Rodulfuls," who (according to Rodulf Glaber), having displeased Duke Richard, went to Rome to lay his cause before the Pope and was induced by him to got to Benevento to fight the Greeks; and after victorious campaigns returned to Normandy (Rec. des Hist. de France, vol x, pp. 25-26). According to the Sens Chron., Count Rodulf, whose son Roger fought in Spain (see p. 756, note "b" below), set out from Normandy for Jerusalem, but when he reached Apulia was asked by the local princeps to abandon his pilgrimage and stop to fight the Greeks, which he did ("Chron. S. Petri Vivi Senonensis," in Idem, p. 223). These writers may refer to Ralph de Toeni, but the identity cannot be proved.

# Note:

    (b) . . . de Stirpe Malahulcii, qui Rollonis patruus fuerat (Will. de Jumieges, p. 157--interpoations by Orderic). An alternative reading is "de stirpe mala Hulcii" (Rec. des Hist. de France, vol xi, p. 38); whence he is called "Hulce" by the Vicomte du Motey, Origines de la Normandie, p. 55, note 4 and p. 173. Nothing is known of Rolf's alleged uncle under either name. If he really existed, the alleged descent might be through the unknown wife of the elder Ralph.

# Note:

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 2679

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/1:754-5
0930 - 1018 Ralph de Toeni 88 88 # Note: As indicated by Burke's Peerage in notes for Hugh de Calvacamp, Ralph received Toeni from his elder brother Hugh, Archbishop of Rouen.

# Note:

    RALPH (or RODULF) DE TOENI I, son of HUGH DE CALVACAMP, was given Tosni by his brother Hugh, and is described as a most powerful man, perhaps in consequence of that gift. He is usually confused with his son Ralph, but there is no authority for such identification, and the dates involved show that there must have been two Ralphs, belonging to successive generations. [Complete Peerage XII/1:754

# Note:

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 2679

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/1:754
1102 - 1155 Baldwin Redviers 53 53 # Note: EARLDOM OF DEVON (I)
# Note:
# Note: BALDWIN DE REVIERS, son and heir of Richard DE REVIERs.


# Note: -------------------------------------------------------

    Baldwin de Redvers, 2nd Earl of Devon. This nobleman, upon the demise of King Henry I, espousing the cause of the Empress Maud, took up arms and immediately fortified his castle of Exeter and the Isle of Wight; but, being besieged by King Stephen, he was obliged to surrender the castle and all his other possessions and to withdraw with his family from the kingdom. We find him, however, soon again returning and in the enjoyment of the Earldom of Devon; but, like his father, generally styled Earl of Exeter, from residing in the city, His lordship m. Lucia, dau. of Dru de Balun, and had issue, Richard, his successor; William, surnamed de Verdon; and Maud. He d. in June, 1155, and was s. by his son, Richard de Redvers, 3rd Earl of Devon. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 140, Courtenay, Barons Courtenay, Earls of Devon]

---

2nd Earl of Devon
Baldwin de Redvers, 2nd Earl of Devon. This Earl upon the demise of King Henry I, espousing the cause of Henry's daughter Maud or Matilda (who had married Henry, Emperor of Germany and thus called Empress Maud, who married later Geoffrey Plantagenet and they were parents of Henry II), took up arms immediately and fortified his castle at Exeter and the Isle of Wight; but being besieged by King Stephen (son of Henry I's sister Adela and Stephen of Blois, Crusader), he was obliged to surrender the castle and all his other possessions and to withdraw and go into exile. (This fight between Empress Maud to put her young son Henry, a baby, on the throne of England, ended in an agreement between her and Stephen whereby she agreed to let him become King if in return her son Henry succeed him, which was done. Stephen was King 1135-1154 and Henry II was King 1154-1189.) Baldwin de Redvers took refuge at the court of the Count of Anjou, and soon after conducted a successful raid into Normandy. About Lent in 1138 he was taken prisoner in Normandy by Enguerrard de Say, a partisan of Stephen, but escaped and returned to England in the autumn of 1139, and, landing at Wareham, seized the Castle of Corfu. This he defended successfully against the King, forcing him to eventually withdraw the siege. By the Empress Maud he was created Earl of Devon, probably about 1141. He married Lucia, daughter of Dru of Balun. He died June, 1155.
(Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith, page 276-277)

He was the son of Richard de Redvers, 1st Earl of Devon. Baldwin de Redvers is also called 1st Earl of Devon.
He founded several monasteries, notably those of Quarr Abbey (1131), in the Isle of Wight, and the Priory of St. James, at Exeter.
(Wikipedia)
1117 - 1155 Lucia of Balun 38 38 1140 Hugh Bardolf # Note:

    Hugh Bardolf the elder, d. c 1176, lord of Waddington, Riseholm, and Scothern, co. Lincoln, brother and heir of Hamelin Bardolf, living 1162, lord of Bungay, Suffolk. The parentage of Hugh and Hamelin Bardolf is unkown, but they were closely
    related to Thomas Bardolf, ancestor of the Lords Bardolf of Wormegay. [Ancestral Roots, Line 132d-28]

# Note:
# Note: ------------------
# Note:
# Note: Hugh Bardolf, d. c 1176, of Waddington, co. Lincoln, & Isabel de Condet. [Ancestral Roots, Line 184a-10]
1140 Isabel de Condet # Note:

    Isabel de Condet (or Cundy), living 1166, had land in South Carlton, co. Lincoln and apparently also in Grimston, co. Nottingham as maritagium; m. Hugh Bardolf the elder, d. c 1176, lord of Waddington, Riseholm, and Scothern, co. Lincoln,
    brother and heir of Hamelin Bardolf, living 1162, lord of Bungay, Suffolk. The parentage of Hugh and Hamelin Bardolf is unkown, but they were closely related to Thomas Bardolf, ancestor of the Lords Bardolf of Wormegay. Note: Isabel's identity
    is proved by her maritagium in South Carlton, co. Lincoln, which land was part of her mother's known holding in that locality, temp. King Stephen. [Magna Charta Sureties]

# Note:
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 132d-28
1165 Beatrice Bardolf 1122 - 1174 Hugo Bardolf 52 52 1152 Maybell Bardolf 1080 - 1161 Akaris FitzBardolf 81 81 # Note:

    Akaris Fitz-Bardolph, in the 5th of Stephen [1140], founded the Abbey of Fors, co. York, then called the Abbey of Charity and dying in 1161, was s. by his elder son, Hervey Fitz-Akaris. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 207, FitzHugh, Barons FitzHugh]

1140 - 1182 Hervey FitzAkaris 42 42 1102 William Bardolf 1108 - 1141 Robert de Condet 33 33 # Note:

    Robert de Condet (or Cundy), d. c 1141, lord of Thorngate Castle in the city of Lincoln, and of Wickhambreux, Kent, Grimston, co. Notthingham, and South Carlton, Thurlby, Eagle and Skellingthorpe, co. Lincoln, son of Osbert de Condet (or
    Cundy), d. by 1130, lord of Wickhambreux, Kent, Grimston, co. Nottingham, and South Carlton, Eagle and Skellingthorpe, co. Lincoln, by Adelaide, daughter and heir of William de Chesney, lord of Caenby and Glentham, co. Lincoln. [Magna Charta
    Sureties]

# Note:
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 132d-27
# Note:
# Note: Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
# Note: Page: 132d-27
# Note: Text: date implied by death of 1st husband
1138 Roger de Condet 1082 - 1130 Osbert de Condet 48 48     Osbert de Condet (or Cundy), d. by 1130, lord of Wickhambreux, Kent, Grimston, co. Nottingham, and South Carlton, Eagle and Skellingthorpe, co. Lincoln, by Adelaide, daughter and heir of William de Chesney, lord of Caenby and Glentham, co. Lincoln. [Magna Charta Sureties]

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 132d-27

1088 Adelaide de Chesney # Note: Adelaide, daughter and heir of William de Chesney, lord of Caenby and Glentham, co. Lincoln. [Magna Charta Sureties]
# Note:
# Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 132d-27
# Note:
# Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 141
# Note: Text: Alice de Cheney
1057 Osbert de Conde 1030 Pierre de Conde 1030 Emma Crispin 1070 William de Chesney William de Chesney, lord of Caenby and Glentham, co. Lincoln. [Magna Charta Sureties]

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 132d-27
1044 - 1086 Ralph de Chesney 42 42 BIOGRAPHY: Fought in the battle of Hastings - 1066.

Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: V:72 chart

---

This family probably originated in Quesnai, Normandy. In England the name was originally spelt de Chesney or de Chasney, being 'latinised' as de Caisneto, and later Cheyney or Cheney. In Scotland the name was commonly spelt Chen from the early 14th century and Cheyne from about 1600. Its progenitor, who came to England at the time of or shortly after the Conquest, was ... Ralf de Caisneto (a 1086) m. Maud (dau of William de Watville)
1048 Maude de Waterville 1073 - 1109 Roger de Chesney 36 36 1085 Sibyl de Chesney 1075 Philip de Caisneto 1178 Roger de Cauz 1185 Nichole de Leigh 1144 Roger de Cauz Sources:
Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Title: "FamilySearch® Ancestral File™ v4.19"
Publication: 3 Feb 2001
Repository:
Name: SLC - Family History Library
Salt Lake City, UT 84150 U.S.A.
SLC - Family History Library
25 N. West Temple Street
Salt Lake City
UT
84150
U.S.A.
Author: Larson, Kirk
Title: "Genealogical Research of Kirk Larson"
Publication: Personal Research Works including Bethune & Hohenlohe Descendants, 1981-2001, Kirk Larson, Private Library
Repository:
Name: Kirk Larson
Laguna Niguel, CA 92677 U.S.A.
Kirk Larson
23512 Belmar Dr.
Laguna Niguel
CA
92677
U.S.A.

1156 - 1217 Bartholomew de Leigh 61 61 1161 - 1241 Emma Rufus 80 80 1126 Hugh de Leigh 1130 Beatrice de Glanville 1090 - 1135 William de Glanville 45 45 Founded Priory of Bromholme in 1113.

    Note: According to Kay Allen in a post to SGM, Moriarty has William Glanville d. about 1113; however, using several other sources, Ray Phair in another posting to SGM states that William founded the Priory of Bromholme in 1113. Therefore I believe that William possibly lived much longer than 1113 and that his death date is not known (ie. William was "fl. 1113", not "d. abt. 1113"). According to Kay Allen (& Moriarty) another of William's sons, Gilbert, Bishop of Rochester died 29 Jun 1214, while Bartholomew died in 1175. I believe that the fact that his sons had death dates so much later than 1113 adds to the case that William also had a much later death date.

Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
Page: Kay Allen, 2 Sep 1998
Text: from G. Andrews Moriarty, New England Historic Genealogical Register 102:292-300, esp. cht. 296f, "The Parentage of Ranulf de Glanville."

Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
Page: Ray Phair, 16 May 2000
1095 Beatrix de Sauqueville 1110 - 1175 Bartholomew de Glanville 65 65 1070 - 1113 Robert William de Sauqueville 43 43 Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
Page: Kay Allen, 2 Sep 1998
Text: from G. Andrews Moriarty, New England Historic Genealogical Register 102:292-300, esp. cht. 296f, "The Parentage of Ranulf de Glanville."
1075 Albreda 1040 - 1079 Herbrand de Salchevilla 39 39 1068 - 1147 Hervey de Glanville 79 79 1046 Roger de Salt-Les- Dames Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
Page: Kay Allen, 2 Sep 1998
Text: from G. Andrews Moriarty, New England Historic Genealogical Register 102:292-300, esp. cht. 296f, "The Parentage of Ranulf de Glanville."
1045 Ranulph de Glanville 1045 Flandrina 1065 - 1150 Robert de Glanville 85 85 Robert's proven ancestry is non-existence. There are indications that the lines were related in some fashion. But there are various opinions about how they are related. The line set out for Robert's brother Hervey, based on Moriarty, has Robert in it as an elder brother, but states that he dsp. The line with Robert as grandfather of Ranulph is based on R. Mortimer, "The Family of Rannulf de Glanville", 'Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research' LIV (1981) 1-16. .

---

Robert de Glanville, Feudal Lord of Bromholm, etc. (vi. A in Pedigree), was at the survey enfeoffed of several Lordships of the Honour of Eye in Suffolk. The following are the Extracts from "Domesday Book" relating to him:

---

"SUFFOLK: HUNDRED OF STOW.- Robert de Glanville holds Crating of Robert Malet, which Leuin, a freeman of Edric, the predecessor of Robert Malet, held in commendation. There is one carucate of land in the soke of the King and the Earl. There were always 6 bordars, and there was then one plough and a half, afterwards 1/2 a plough, and now two ploughs in demesne. There was then half a plough belonging to the men, 3 acres of meadow, and the 4th part of a mill. There were then 2 horses, now there are none. Now there are 4 steers, 14 hogs, and 43 sheep, and 6 freemen of the same. Leuin holds in commendation 12 1/2 acres. There was always 1/2 a plough among all, and there is a soke man of the same Edric of [i.e., holding] 28 acres. There was always 1/2 a plough. Then and afterwards the whole was worth 20 shillings; it is now worth 30 shillings." (D. B., pp. 304, 304b.)

---

"BOSEMERE HUNDRED.- In Crating is one freeman who, in the time of King Edward, was under the protection of Edric. There are 20 acres and 2 bordars; and there was then 1/2 a plough; now 1 ox, and 1 acre of meadow, and it is worth 3 shillings and 4 pence. Walter of Caen holds it. In the same is 1 freeman, and 1 1/2 acres, who was the man of a certain client of Edric's, and it is worth 2 shillings, and Robert de Glanville holds it." (D. B., p. 304b.)

---

"PLUMESGAT HUNDRED.- . . . . . In Gliemham is a freeman of Almicin(?). There are 15 acres, and they are worth 2 shillings. Robert de Glanville holds it. The soke is the Abbot's." (D. B., p. 308b)

---

"PLUMESGAT HUNDRED.- . . . . . In Benhal 4 freemen hold 8 acres in commendation, and they are worth 16 pence. They are in demesne. The soke is the Abbot's. In the same I freeman holds in commendation 1 acre and 1/2, and it is worth 6d. Robert de Glanville holds it. The soke is the Abbot's." (D. B., p. 309.)

---

"HUNDRED OF CARLEFORD.- . . . . . In Burch, Robert de Glanville holds one freeman, Wlunin, the Priest, who was under the protection of Edric, in the time of King Edward. There are 6 acres, and they are worth 12 pence; and 11 acres of freeland, and they are worth 11 pence." (D. B p. 315b.)

---

"HUNDRED OF PLUMESGAT.- Baldeseie (?) a berauite (barton) of Holeslea, which Robert de Glanville holds of R. Malet, 1 carucate of land. There were always 3 bordars. Then there was 1 plough and 1/2, now there are two. Then, it was worth 25 shillings, now it is worth 40 shillings, and it is one mile in length and 5 furlongs in breadth; and it returns 27 pence for gelt. In the same ville 17 freemen, under the protection of E[dric], held 60 acres of land in the time of King Edward. There were then 3 ploughs, now l 1/2, and 4 acres of meadow. It was then worth 10 shillings, it is now worth 12. In How, 1 freeman for the 4th part of 1 acre worth 2 pence." (D. B., p. 317b.)

---

"HUNDRED OF WILEFORD.- . . . . . In Alretun there were 31 freemen in the time of King Edward, now 34, under the protection of Edric, of these Godric, the predecessor of Swain, had the protection of 2 1/2, but W. Malet has been seised thereof, There is 1 carucate of land and 80 acres, and one bordar and 1/2. There were then 6 ploughs, now 5; and 20 acres of meadow. It was then worth 40 shillings, it is now worth 100s. There is a church, 24 acres, and 1 acre of meadow, and they are worth 4 shillings, and in Holeslea is a mill worth 12 shillings. All this Robert de Glanville holds." (D.B., p. 317b.)

---

"HUNDRED OF WILEFORD.- . . . . . In Carlesford, Robert de Glanville holds of Robert Malet, 24 freemen, [who were] under the protection of Edric in the time of King Edward. There are two carucates of land and 5 bordars. There were then 7 ploughs, now 4, and 4 acres of meadow. It was then worth 30 shillings, it is now worth 40, and it is one mile in length and 5 furlongs in breadth, and it returns 12 pence 1/2 for geld. Belonging to the church are 36 acres worth 3 shillings." (D. B., p. 319.)

---

"HUNDRED OF LOXA.- . . . . . In Dalingehow, Robert de Glanville holds of Robert Malet 4 freemen, under the protection of Edric. There are 80 acres and 17, and 1 bordar. There was always 2 ploughs and 2 acres of meadow. There is wood for 4 hogs. It was always 21 shillings." (D. B., pp. 327, 327b.)

---

"BISSOPES HUNDRED.- . .. .. Godwin held Berdefeld in the time of Edward for a manor. There are 4 carucates of land. There were then 18 bordars, now 23. There were always 2 ploughs in demesne. There were then 8 ploughs belonging to the men, now 9. There is wood for 200 hogs and 9 acres of meadow. There were then 2 nag-horses, now 1. There were then 9 steers, now 20. There were then 40 hogs, now 60, and 83 sheep. It was then worth £6, now £7. It is 6 furlongs in length and 8 in breadth, and returns 3 1/2d for geld. Edric held Stetebroc in the time of K. Edward. There are 5 1/2 carucates of land. Then and afterwards 16 villians, now 11. Then 11 bordars, now 30. Then 11 ploughs in demesne, afterwards 6, now 5. Then and
afterwards there were 12 ploughs. And Wingberg(?) to wit a barton in the same account and valuation. Now 5 ploughs, and 12 ploughs can be restored in all. There are 20 acres of meadow and wood for 400 hogs. There were then 5 nag-horses. There were then 16 hogs, now 30, and 30 sheep. There are two churches having 40 acres, and 1/2 a plough, and 17 sokemen having one carucate of land and 3 ploughs, wood for 40 hogs and 5 acres of meadow. The soke of these sokemen is in Hoxa, the Bishop's Manor, and Edric (The Dane) held half of the Bishop. It was then worth £14, it is now worth £16. And of this manor Walter holds 2 sokemen of 40 acres, and they are worth 8 shillings. Robert de Glanville 4 of 20 acres, worth 5 shillings in the same valuation; and Walter, the son of Grip, one of 15 acres, worth 30 pence in the same valuation; Leornic, one of 20 acres, worth 26 pence in the same valuation. Edric has the soke and sac. It is two miles in length and one broad, and
it returns 14 pence 1/2 for geld. Others hold there." (D. B pp. 328b, 329.)

---

"In Torstanestun are 6 acres, and they are worth 12 pence. Robert de Glanville holds this of William de Warena (?)." (D. B p. 400b.)

---

Robert de Glanville also held half a Knight's Fee of Norwich. [The measurements at this period are not the same as in the present day. A "lenca," or mile, far exceeded our standard English mile of 1760 yards. And an "acre" is a difficult thing
to explain.] [Ref: Records of the Anglo-Norman House of Glanville from A.D. 1050 to 1880, by Wm. Urmston S. Glanville-Richard, Esq. (London: Mitchell and Hughes 1882)
1010 Rainald de Glanville 0980 Richard de Belfoi 0955 Hammon de Saint Sauveur Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
Page: 123
Godchilde 0872 - 0931 Rollo Rognvaldsson 59 59 # Note: Rollo, also called ROLF, or ROU, French ROLLON (b. c. 860--d. c. 932), Scandinavian rover who founded the duchy of Normandy.

    Making himself independent of King Harald I of Norway, Rollo sailed off to raid Scotland, England, Flanders, and France on pirating expeditions and, about 911, established himself in an area along the Seine River. Charles III the Simple of France held off his siege of Paris, battled him near Chartres, and negotiated the treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte, giving him the part of Neustria that came to be called Normandy; Rollo in return agreed to end his brigandage. He gave his son,  William I Longsword, governance of the dukedom (927) before his death. Rollo was baptized in 912 but is said to have died a pagan. [Encyclopaedia Britannica CD, 1997, ROLLO]

# Note: Banished from Norway to the Hebrides ca. 876.

---

Rollo of Normandy
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Rollo (c.860 - c.932) was the Frankish-Latin name taken by (probably) Hrolf Ganger (Hrolf the Walker, Old Norse: Hrólfr Rögnvaldsson and Göngu-Hrólfr, Norwegian: Gange-Rolf). He has also been called "Rollo the Gangler" in some works, or occasionally "Robert".

Rollo was a Viking leader, probably (based on Icelandic sources) from Norway, the son of Ragnvald, Earl of Moer; sagas mention a Hrolf, son of Ragnvald jarl of Moer. However, the latinization Rollo has in no known instance been applied to a Hrolf, and in the texts which speak of him, numerous latinized Hrolfs are included. Dudo of St. Quentin (by most accounts a more reliable source, and at least more recent and living nearer the regions concerned), in his Gesta Normannorum, tells of a powerful Danish (here called Dacian which often happened in medieval sources) nobleman at loggerheads with the king of Denmark (Dacia), who then died and left his two sons, Gurim and Rollo, leaving Rollo to be expelled and Gurim killed.(1) With his followers (known as Normans, or northmen), Rollo invaded the area of northern France now known as Normandy. Wace, writing some 300 years after the event, gives a Scandinavian origin, as does the Orkneyinga Saga, Danish or Norwegian most likely.

Concluding the Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte (911) with the French king Charles the Simple, Rollo pledged feudal allegiance to the king, changed his name to the Frankish version, and converted to Christianity, probably with the baptismal name Robert. In return he was granted the lower Seine area (today's upper Normandy) and the titular rulership of Normandy, centred around the city of Rouen. There exists some argument among historians as to whether Rollo was a "duke" (dux) or whether his position was equivalent to that of a "count" under Charlemagne. According to legend, when required, in conformity with general usage, to kiss the foot of King Charles, he refused to stoop to what he considered so great a degradation; yet as the homage could not be dispensed with, he ordered one of his warriors to perform it for him. The latter, as proud as his chief, instead of stooping to the royal foot, raised it so high, that the King fell to the ground.

Sometime around 927 he passed the Duchy of Normandy to his son, William Longsword. He may have lived for a few years after that, but certainly died before 933.

He was a direct ancestor of William the Conqueror. By William, he was a direct ancestor of the present-day British royal family, including Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

The "clameur de haro" on the Channel Islands is, supposedly, an appeal to Rollo.

See also: Ålesund, Viking Age, Dukes of Normandy

1682 - 1758 Elizabeth Wood 76 76 Note:

    http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=stevensp&id=I02007&ti=5519
    http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=snorewicz&id=I119&ti=5519
    Snorewicz, Meadow, Harby Families
    http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2836859&id=I009262&ti=5519

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2974850&id=I579717112
1146 - 1208 Ada Huntington 62 62 1104 - 1178 Ada De Warenne 74 74 Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on
Page: United Kingdom-Ancestry of the British Royal House

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/1:496 (g)

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 89-25
1072 - 1130 Matilda of Huntingdon 58 58 1152 - 1207 Isabel de Camville 55 55 1077 William de Baliol 1040 - 1086 Reginald de Baliol 46 46 English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086 - 1327
Author: I. J. Sanders
Publication: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1960,p. 25


Hugh - Son of Guy Baliol; father of Hugh II Baliol. [Charlemagne & Others, Chart 2908b]

WAITE, NEWLIN LINE

Rainald - father of Hugh Balliol. [GRS 3.03, Automated Archives, CD#100]

Rainald the Sheriff of Shropshire, otherwise known as Rainald de Balgiole or Baliol, another of Earl Roger Montgomery's domains in NOrmandy, was also a tenant in chief in Staffordshire. He also assisted in the administration of Earl Roger's Shropshire. He was married to Amiera, Earl Roger's niece. Rainald/Renaud was at the Battle of Hastings. He may be one and the same as Pierre, Knight of Balliol and Fecamp who contributed one ship and 20 men-at-arms to the battle, or perhaps a brother of Pierre. Undoubtedly, subsequent Kings of Scotland were descended from this source which also produced Bishops of Lincoln. [Rainauld the Sheriff's Shropshire Land Holdings in Domesday 1086


Sources:

   1. Repository:
            Name: Denver Public Library
      Title: Charlemagne, Alfred the Great and Other Ancestors
      Author: Mitchell, James T.
      Publication: 1991
      Page: Chart 2908b
   2. Repository:
            Name: Cheryl Varner Library
      Title: Automated Archives, Automated Family Pedigrees #1, CD#100
      Author: Automated Archives, Inc.
      Publication: Genealogical Research System, 1994 
1022 Guy de Baliol 1154 - 1201 Margaret of Huntington Dunkeld 47 47 1144 - 1219 David de Huntingdon 75 75 # Note: David, EARL OF HUNTINGDON &C., by Maud, 1st sister and coheir of Ranulph (DE BLUNDEVILLE), EARL OF CHESTER. [Complete Peerage]

------------------------------

# Note: on the history of the Earldom of Huntingdon:

    After Earl Simon's [Matilda's 1st husband] death, his Widow married David I of Scotland, who consequently became Earl of Huntingdon too, keeping the Earldom even after he succeeded his brother as King of Scots. He sided with the Empress Maud against Stephen I but came to terms with the latter and made the Earldom over to his son Henry. Henry swore fealty to Stephen but subsequently fought against him under the Scottish banner, which may account for Simon de St Liz's son, another Simon, being recognized as Earl of Huntingdon before Henry's death in 1152. Thereafter the Earldom was more or less bounced back and forth between the de St Liz family and the Kings of Scotland, first being held 1157-65 by Malcolm the Maiden and (1165-74) by his brother William The Lion, King of Scots, then by a Simon de St Liz (grandson of the first Simon and son of the second) from 1174 to 1184.

# Note:

    When the third Simon de St Liz died in 1184 he left no surviving issue and David, younger brother of the Kings of Scots just mentioned, assumed the Earldom from 1185 (on the handing over of it to him by William the Lion) till it was taken away from him in 1215 or 1216 by King John. He got it back again in 1218, however. [Burke's Peerage]

-------------------------------------

    David, Earl of Huntingdon, accompanied King Richard I to the Holy Land with 500 men in his train; but upon his return, his fleet being shattered, his lordship was made prisoner by the Egyptians and eventually redeemed by the Venetians. He m. Maud, dau. of Hugh Kyvelioc, and sister and co-heir of Ralph, Earl of Chester, and had surviving issue, John surnamed Le Scot, Margaret, Isabel, Ada, Maud. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883]

# Note:

Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
Page: 7-3, 41-3, 139-1

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: III:169

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 131-29

---

Earl of Huntington, Garioch, and Lennox

David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon (born c. 1144, died 17 June 1219) was a Scottish prince. He was the youngest surviving son of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, a daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, and Elizabeth de Vermandois. His paternal grandfather was David I of Scotland. Huntingdon was granted to him after his elder brother William I of Scotland ascended the throne. David's son John succeeded him to the earldom.

In the litigation for succession to the crown of Scotland in 1290-1292, David's sister's (Ada's) great-great-grandson Floris V, Count of Holland (who also then pursued the throne for himself) claimed that Earl David had renounced his hereditary rights to the throne of Scotland. The veracity of renunciation cannot have otherwise been ascertained, nor its reasons.

He married Maude of Chester, daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester, by whom he had three sons (John, Robert, and Henry) and four daughters (Matilda, Ada, Isobel, and Margaret). After the extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house in 1290 when the legitimate line of William I of Scotland ended, David's descendants were the prime candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (grandfather of King Robert I of Scotland) and John of Scotland were his descendants through David's daughters Isobel of Huntingdon and Margaret of Huntingdon respectively.
1368 - 1426 Edith De Grey 58 58 # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
# Note: Page: 93a-31
1177 Margaret de Braose 0990 - 1055 Hugh De Montgomery 65 65 1074 de Salt-Les- Dames 1105 Gilbert de Venables 1212 Emma de Cauz 1235 - 1308 Reynold de Grey 73 73 # Note:

    Reynold de Grey, 1st Lord (Baron) Grey (of Wilton), so created by writ of summons to Parliament 24 June 1295 (although the assembly in question is not now recognised as a bona fide Parliament; he had, however, attended the assembly called a full Parliament of 29 May 1290); held the Manors of Brogborough, Thurleigh and Wrest, Beds; Great Brickhill, Snellson and Water Eaton or Waterhall, Bucks; Hemingford, Toseland and Yelling, Hunts; Kempleigh, Glos; Purleigh, Essex; Rushton, Cheshire; Ruthin, Denbighs; Shirland and Wilton, Herefs; Sheriff of Notts and Derbys and Constable of Nottingham Castle March 1265/6; Constable of Northampton Castle June 1267-Jan 1267/8; Justice of Chester, Constable of Chester Castle and Sheriff of Cheshire 1270-74; Justice of Chester 1281; granted 1282 Ruthin Castle; present at English victory over Scots at Falkirk 1298. [Burke's Peerage]

----------------------------------

BARONY OF GREY OF WILTON (I)

    SIR REYNOLD DE GREY, of Ruthin, co. Denbigh, Wilton, co. Hereford, Shirland, co. Derby, Rushton, co. Chester, Purleigh, Essex, Toseland, Hemingford, and YeIling, Hunts, Water Eaton or Waterhall, Snellson, and Great Brickhill, Bucks, Thurleigh, Wrest, and Brogborough, Beds, and Kempley, co. Gloucester, son and heir of Sir John DE GREY, of Shirland (who died shortly before 18 March 1265/6) by his 2nd wife, Emma, apparently widow of John De SEGRAVE, who died s.p. 1230, and daughter of Roger DE CAUZ, by Nichole, daughter and heir of Bartholomew DE LEIGH. In 1257 he had a grant to him and his heirs of a weekly market at his manor of Wilton. He was appointed Sheriff of cos. Notts and Derby, and Constable of Nottingham Castle, 18 Mar. 1265/6, in succession to his father, then recently dead. On 28 March 1266 he had livery of his father's lands, by special grace, his homage being respited. On 28 December 1266 he was ordered to deliver Nottingham Castle to Roger de Leyburne . He was Constable of Northampton Castle from 25 June 1267 to 30 January 1267/8, and justice of Chester, Constable of Chester Castle, and Sheriff of co. Chester, from 1270 to 16 October 1274. He was summoned for Military Service from 12 December 1274 to 8 July 1306, to attend the King at Shrewsbury, 28 June 1283, to attend the King at Salisbury, 26 January 1296/7, and to Parliament from 24 June 1295 to 26 August 1307, by writs directed Reginaldo de Grey, and, moreover, is recorded to have been present in pleno parliamento domini Regis on the morrow of Trinity 29 May 1290, with other magnates et proceres tunc in parliamento existentes, whereby he is held to have become LORD GREY. As Reginaldus de Grey dominus de Ruthyn he took pirt in the Barons' Letter to the Pope, 12 February 1300/1. In Jan. 1276/7 be was about to go to Wales on the King's service, and he was with the King in Wales in 1277 and 1282. On 14 November 1281 he was appointed justice of Chester and Keeper of co. Chester, of all the demesne lands of the King in that county, of the castles of Chester and Flint, and the cantreds of Englefield and Ros, &c., for 8 years from Michaelmas 1281, at a rent of 1,000 marks a year: he was reappointed 30 June 1290, for 9 years from Michaelmas following, at a rent of 727 marks 8s. On 15 June 1282 the King granted him seizin of the lands of Bromfield and Yale [co. Denbigh], during pleasure, and on 23 October following the castle of Ruthin, the cantred of Dyffryn Clwyd, and the lands that had belonged to Gwenllian de Lascy in the cantreds of Dyffryn Clwyd and Englefield, to hold in fee, by the service of three knights' fees. On 16 October 1294 he was about. to go to Wales. He was at the battle of Falkirk, 22 July 1298. On 26 May 1301 he did homage and fealty for the castle of Ruthin to Edward, Prince of Wales, at Kenilworth.

He married Maud, daughter and heir of Sir Henry DE LONGCIIAMP, of Wilton, co. Hereford. She died before 21 November 1302. He died 5 April 1308. [Complete Peerage VI:171-3

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 1226

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: VI:171-3
1294 Elizabeth de Hastings # Note:

Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 93a-30
1134 Maud Banastre 1155 Margery FitzWolfric de Hatton 0975 - 1068 Josceline de Ponteaudemer 93 93 1032 Maud de Ingelrica 1182 - 1228 Reginald de Braose 46 46 Reginald de Braose supported his brother Giles in his rebellions against King John. They were both active against the King in the barons' war. Neither was present at the signing of Magna Carta because they were still rebels who refused to compromise. John acquiesced to Reginald's claims to the de Braose estates in Wales in May 1216. He became Lord of Brecon, Abergavenny, Builth and other Marcher Lordships but was very much a vassal of Llewelyn Fawr, Prince of Gwynedd and now his father-in-law. Henry III restored Reginald to favour and the Bramber estates (confiscated from William by K. John) in 1217. At this seeming betrayal, Rhys and Owain, Reginald's nephews who were princes of Deheubarth, were incensed and they took Builth (except the castle). Llywelyn Fawr also became angry and besieged Brecon. Reginald eventually surrendered to Llewelyn and gave up Seinhenydd (Swansea). By 1221 they were at war again with Llewelyn laying siege to Builth. The siege was relieved by Henry III's forces. From this time on Llewelyn tended to support the claims of Reginald's nephew John concerning the de Braose lands.

Reginald was a witness to the re-issue of Magna Carta by Henry III in 1225.
1180 - 1249 Matilda de Clare 69 69 1181 - 1236 Leuca de Braose 55 55 1038 - 1088 Robert de Toeni 50 50 1027 Raoul de Toeni 1053 - 1084 Maud d'Avranches 31 31 1075 Bernard Baliol 1146 - 1211 William de Braose 65 65 William de Braose, Fourth Lord of Bramber (1140/1150 - August 9, 1211) at his peak was also lord of Gower, Abergavenny, Brecknock, Builth, Radnor, Kington, Limerick, Skenfrith, Grosmont, and Whitecastle. His rise and fall at the hands of king John is often taken as an example of that king's arbitrary and capricious behavior towards his barons.

William was the son of William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber and Bertha of Hereford, daughter of Miles Fitz Walter, Earl of Hereford and his wife, formerly Sibyl de Neufmarche. From his father he inherited the Rape of Bramber, in Sussex, and through his mother he inherited a large estate in the Welsh Marches.

In 1175, William carried out the Massacre of Abergavenny, killing several Welsh princes to avenge the death of his uncle Henry, Earl of Hereford, after having invited them to a feast at Abergavenny Castle. This resulted in great hostility against him among the Welsh, who named him the "Ogre of Abergavenny".

In 1199, William fought beside King Richard the Lion-heart at Chalus, where Richard was killed.

He was greatly favored by King John early in his reign. John granted him all that he might conquer from the Welsh in Radnor, gave him lordship over Limerick in Ireland (save for the city itself), possession of Glamorgan castle, and then lordship over Gower.

In 1203, William was put in charge of Arthur of Brittany, whom he had personally captured the previous year. William was suspected of involvement in Arthur's disappearance, although no concrete evidence ever came to light. There is somewhat better evidence that he at least knew the truth of the matter.

In 1206 John gave William the three great castles of Gwent (Skenfrith, Grosmont, and Whitecastle). At this point only an earldom separated him from the greatest in England.

But soon after William fell out of favor with the king. The precise reasons remain obscure. John's stated reasons regard money de Braose owed the crown. But the king's actions went far beyond what would be necessary to recover the debt. Instead, he evidently wanted to break de Burgh, and to that end invaded Wales to seize the de Braose domains there. Beyond that, he sought de Braose's wife, who, the story goes, had made no secret of her belief that John had murdered Arthur of Brittany.

De Braose fled to Ireland, then returned to Wales as John hunted him in Ireland. In Wales, William allied himself to the Welsh prince Llewelyn and helped him in rebellion against King John.

In 1210, William fled in disguise to France and died the following year at Corbeil. William's wife, Maud de St. Valery, and eldest son, William, were captured and murdered by King John, possibly starved to death.

While William had aroused the jealousy of the other barons during his rise, the arbitrary and violent manner of his fall very likely discomfited them and played a role in the baronial uprisings of the next decade. The historian Sidney Painter, in his biography of King John, called it "the greatest mistake John made during his reign, as the king revealed to his barons once and for all his capacity for cruelty".

Eventually, William's third son, Reginald de Braose reacquired some of his father's titles and lands. The middle son, Giles, was Bishop of Hereford from 1200 until his death in 1215.

William also had a daughter, Margaret, who married Walter de Lacy, Lord of Meath.



Sources:

   1. Abbrev: Gedcom FileThorns among the roses, 14 March 2003,
      Title: Gedcom FileThorns among the roses, 14 March 2003, Holly Forrest Tamer bhtt141@netins.nethtt141@netins.nethtt141@netins.net.
0890 Hugh de Calvacamp # Note:

    Hugh de Calvacamp; b most likely c890; of French rather than Norman extraction; had, with another elder son (Hugh, b probably by 915, monk at Abbey of St Denis, France, Archbishop Rouen, Normandy, 942, had issue (probably illegitimate), made over that part of the archiepiscopal lands consisting of the feudal territory of Toeni (modern Tosny, on the Seine southeast of Rouen) to his brother Ralph and died 10 Nov 989 or 990). [Burke's Peerage]

---

Hugh de Calvacamp, a Frenchman, was b. probably about 890. Nothing is know of him except that he was the father of two sons, whose names follow. [Complete Peerage XII/1:753]

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999
Page: 2679

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/1:753
1085 - 1147 Robert FitzHarold de Ewyas 62 62 0982 - 1052 Emma Normandy 70 70 Emma (c. 982-March 6, 1052), daughter of Richard I, Duke of Normandy, by his second wife Gunnora, was twice queen of England, by marriage first (1002-1016) to king Ethelred the Unready and then (1017-1035) to Canute, king also of Denmark and Norway.

Upon the Danish invasion of England in 1013, Emma took her sons by Ethelred - Alfred and Edward - to Normandy, where they remained upon her return to England to marry Canute, now king of England following the death of Ethelred and his son (her step-son) Edmund Ironside.

Following Canute's death, Alfred and Edward returned in 1036, possibly in an attempt to overthrow Canute's illegitimate son Harold Harefoot, who had established himself as ruler in the absence of Harthacanute, son of Canute and Emma. Alfred was captured and died after being blinded, while Edward escaped to Normandy, followed by his mother.

The death of Harold in 1040 and the accession of the more conciliatory Harthacanute paved the way for Edward's return to England the next year as co-ruler and (1042) king on Harthacanute's death. Emma returned to end her days at Winchester, Hampshire, where she was buried alongside Canute.

Emma's marriages and subsequent role forged the link between England and Normandy which was to culminate in her grandnephew William of Normandy's invasion of England in 1066.
0946 Herfast de Crepon # Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 100
0911 Sprote Adela de Senlis # Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
Page: 121e-19

Text: Sprota (Danish wife of William I of Normandy), a Breton (no last name)

# Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
Page: 6, 100
Text: Sporta de Senlis

# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: VI:447 (g)
Text: not named but implied as mother of Richard I & Ralph d'Ivry
0943 Ralph d'Ivry # Note: provided by Curt Hofemann, curt_hofemann@yahoo.com
# Note:
# Note:
# Note: Count d'Ivry [Ref: Tompsett, Wm Conqueror]
# Note: half-brother: Richard I Duke of Normandy [Ref: ES III:694A]
# Note:
# Note:

    ...Richard the Fearless' mother, Espriota, married, in the troublous times of his boyhood, a rich countryman called Sperling. They had a son called Raoul of Ivry, who seems to have been high in power and favor with the second Richard, his half-brother... [Ref: The Normans by Sarah Orne Jewett, Chapter V, DUKE RICHARD THE GOOD http://www.public.coe.edu/~theller/soj/nor/nor05.html]

# Note:
# Note:

    Douglas mentions a 'half' brother of Richard, who assumed the title of count between 1006 and 1011. p.89 A clearer example of the acquisition by a feudal family of lands which had earlier been part of the ducal demesne, can be seen in the descent of the possessions of Count Rudolf, half-brother to Duke Richard I. Among the lands held by this man were estates situated on the Risle near Saint Philibert; estates on the Eure, including Concherel, Jouy, and, it would seem, Pacy; lands dependent on Breteuil; and lands centred on Ivry. Many of these lands, particularly those on the Eure, were inextricably intermingled with the earliest demesne of the Norman duke and must have come to Rudulf through his stepfather or his half-brother. Their subsequent devolution is thus of particular interest. Part of Ivry lands went to the count's eldest son Hugh, bishop of Bayeux, while the barony of Saint Philibert passed through the count's second son, John bishop of Avranches, to that cathedral church. But the larger part of Rudolf's possessions, including the honour of Pacy and the district honour of Breteuil, descended through the count's daughter, Emma, to her husband Osbern, the steward of Duke Robert I, and one of the guardians of the infant William. [Ref note: the previous URL of the online source of this is no longer valid & a google.com search did not show a new URL ... Curt 01/01/03]

# Note:
# Note:

    The ducal family of Normandy early determined to have an historiographer whom they sought in France, one Dudon, dean of the chapter of St. Quentin, who between 1015-30 wrote in Latin half verse, half prose, a history of the family according to the traditions and accounts transmitted to him by Raoul, Count of Ivry grandson of Rollo and brother of Richard I Alinea. [Ref: Catholic Encyclopedia http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11104a.htm]

# Note:
# Note: Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968
# Note: Page: 88,100
# Note: Text: Raoul I Comte de \Bayeux\
# Note:
# Note: Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
# Note: Page: VI:447 (g)Text: Ralph d'Ivry ,VIII:208
0990 - 1077 Godehut de Barcelona 87 87 1170 - 1216 Eustace de Vescy 46 46 # Note:

    EUSTACE DE VESCY, 1st son and heir, was born 1169-71. He attended Richard's 2nd Coronation at Winchester, 17 April 1194, and was with him at Chinon, in France, 12 December following. In 1199 he was one of the guarantors of the treaty between John and Reinald, Count of Boulogne, sealed at La Roche d'Andely, 18 August, and in the same year, probably later, he was sent to William the Lion of Scotland to promise him satisfaction of his rights in England and to secure his fidelity to John. On 22 November 1200 he was one of the witnesses of William's homage at Lincoln. In April 1209 he was deputed, with others, to meet William the Lion on his visit to King John, and in the following year he was with the King in Ireland. In 1212, being one of the first of the barons to incur John's suspicions of his fidelity, he fled to Scotland and was outlawed, his property being seized. After John's submission to the Pope he had to invite Eustace back, 27 May 1213, although on the same day orders were sent to Philip de Ulecot to destroy his castle at Alnwick. On 18 July following he and others received John's pledge to abide by the Pope's decision concerning his excommunication. Eustace's lands were restored on the next day and the warrant for slighting Alnwick Castle was revoked. In November 1214 he was warned by the Pope not to trouble the King by reason of John's previous disputes with the barons; and in the following spring he was pleading the barons' cause at the papal court. He was among the leaders of the barons who wrung the charter from John, 15 June 1215, and was one of those appointed to see its provisions carried out. On 16 December 1215 he and other magnates were excommunicated by the Pope.

# Note:

    He married, in 1193, at Roxburgh, Margaret, illegitimate daughter of WILLIAM THE LION, KING OF SCOTLAND, by (----), daughter of Adam DE HYTHUS. While marching from the north to do homage to Louis of France at Dover, he was killed at Barnard Castle, August 1216 (h). His widow was living, 13 November 1218, and probably in 1226. [Complete Peerage XII/2:275-6, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

# Note:

    (h) Louis of France landed at Thanet, 21 May 1216, at the invitation of the baronial party. In marching to meet him, Alexander II of Scotland and his brother-in-law, Eustace de Vescy, "virum nobilem et potentum", laid siege to Barnard Castle, which was held by Hugh de Balliol for the King. During an assault on the castle Eustace was shot through the head by an arrow and killed.

---------------------------------------------

    Eustace de Vesci, who attaining majority in the 2nd Richard I [1191], gave 2,300 marks for the livery of his lands, with liberty to marry whom he pleased. In the 14th King John [1213], when the first commotion arose amongst the barons, the king, hastening to London, summoned all the suspected lords thither and forced each to give hostages for his peaceable demeanor. But this Eustace, one of the most suspected, refused to attend the summons and fled into Scotland, whereupon all his possessions in England were seized upon by the crown and a special command issued to demolish his castle at Alnwick. But a reconciliation between the kind and his turbulent nobles soon afterwards taking place through the influence of the legate Pandulph, Eustace had restitution of his estates. But this was a deceitful calm -- the winds were only stilled to rage with greater violence -- the baronial conflict ere long burst forth more furiously and was only allayed by those concessions on the part of the crown, which have immortalized the plains of Runnymede. The cause of this celebrated quarrel, in which, by the way the people had little or no immediate interest, was doubtless of long standing and was based on  the encroachment of the Sovereign on the privileges of the nobility, but the spark that ignited the flame was personal injury; an affront inflicted by King John on this Eustace de Vesci. "Hearing," writes Sir William Dugdale, "that Eustace de Vesci had a very beautiful wife, but far distant from the court, and studying how to accomplish his licentious desires toward her, sitting at table with her husband and seeing a ring on his finger, he laid hold on it and told him that he had another such stone, which he resolved to set in gold in that very form. And having thus got the ring, presently sent it to her in her husband's name, by that token conjuring her, if ever she expected to see him alive, to come speedily to him.  She, therefore, upon sight of the ring, gave credit to the messenger and came with all expedition. But it so happened that her husband casually riding out met her on the road, and marvelling much to see her there, asked what the matter was, and when he understood how they were both deluded, resolved to find a common woman and put her in apparel to personate his lady." The king afterwards boasting to the injured husband of the favours he had received, Eustace had the pleasure of undeceiving him, "whereat the king grew so enraged that he threatened to kill him; Eustace, therefore, apprehending danger, hastened into the north, divers of the nobles whose wives they king had vitiated accompanying him. And being grown strong by the confluence of their friends and others, seized his castles, the Londoners adhering to them." When John was subsequently brought to submission, Eustace de Vesci was one of the twenty-five Barons appointed to enforce the observance  of Magna Carta, but he was slain soon after, about 1216, by an arrow from the ramparts of Barnard Castle (belonging to Hugh de Baliol), which he had commenced besieging, or was about to attack. He had m. Margaret, natural dau. of William, King of Scotland, and was s. by his son, William de Vesci. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 555, Vesci, Barons Vesci]

------------------------------------------------

    Eustace de Vesci, one of the twenty-five barons appointed to enforce the observance of Magna Carta, elder brother of Warine de Vesci (father of Margerie who m. Gilbert de Aton), succeeded his father, William de Vesci; m. Margaret, dau. of  William and sister of Alexander, kings of Scotland; and, dying about 1216, was s. by his son, William de Vesci. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 15, Aton, Barons de Aton]

Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/2:275-276
1025 - 1066 Richard le Goz 41 41 # Note: HUGH D'AVRANCHES, EARL OF CHESTER
# Note: The Conqueror and His Companions
# Note: by J.R. Planché, Somerset Herald. London: Tinsley Brothers, 1874.
# Note:
# Note:

    Richard Goz, Vicomte d'Avranches, or more properly of the Avranchin, was one of the sons of the aforesaid Turstain, by his wife Judith de Montanolier, and appears not only to have avoided being implicated in the rebellion of his father, but obtained his pardon and restoration to the Vicomté of the Hiemois, to which at his death he succeeded, and to have strengthened his position at court by securing the hand of Emma de Conteville, one of the daughters of Herluin and Herleve, and half-sister of his sovereign. By this fortunate marriage he naturally recovered the lands forfeited by his father and bestowed on his mother-in-law, and acquired also much property in the Avranchin, of which he obtained the Vicomté, in addition to that of the Hiemois.

# Note:

    There was every reason, therefore, that he should follow his three brothers-in-law in the expedition to England, if not prevented by illness or imperative circumstances. He must have been their senior by some twenty years, but still scarcely past the prime of life, and his son Hugh a stripling under age, as his mother, if even older than her brothers Odo and Robert, could not have been born before 1030, and if married at sixteen, her son in 1066 would not be more than nineteen at the utmost. Mr. Freeman, who places the marriage of Herleve with Herluin after the death of Duke Robert in 1035, would reduce this calculation by at least six years, rendering the presence of her grandson Hugh at Senlac more than problematical.

---------------------------------------------------

    Crispin, M 1969 (pp. 79-80) is no doubt incorrect in showing Emma de Conteville as Richard's wife. Moriarty, 1985 (p. 11) says the marriage is probably unfounded. However Todd A. Farmerie cited the marriage, 7 July 2000, based upon an article by Keats-Rohan. But Todd says the mother was "Turuvai".
0994 Eldred of England 0999 - 1079 Eudes of Brittany