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PLEASE NOTE: If you do not see a GRAPHIC IMAGE of a family tree here but are seeing this text instead then it is most probably because the web server is not correctly configured to serve svg pages correctly. see http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/SVG:Server_Configuration for information on how to correctly configure a web server for svg files. ? Living White Living White Living York 1908 - 1980 Albert O. White 71 71 His middle name may have been Onis or Oney instead of Eugene.

He told us his father was half Native American from around the Great Lakes area.  Menominee? or something like that.  He showed us a map when we were children and pointed out the area and the name of the tribe (but we were all young and cannot remember exactly what he told us).  Mom thinks it was his Mother who was part Indian.

He made awesome homemade Yeast Doughnuts!

He had brothers & sisters but their names are not known.

He was an Underwater Welder in the Seabees.

The Navy put him in a Tuberculosis Hospital in Texas.  He remarried Bessie after he was released from the hospital. 

He spent time in California while he and Bessie were divorced and may have married (or not) a woman there and had a daughter named Patty.

The following is 100% true and accurate:

Flem White and Maggie White (White was her maiden name) were the parents of
Albert White.  Albert married Bessie Kelley and fathered
James Walter White who married Betty Joe York and fathered me:
Catherine Neal White.  My daughter by Adell Ward Jr is
Jennfier Denise Ward


1918 - 1977 Bessie J Kelley on 1930 Census 58 58 Kelley is an Irish name meaning "troublesome", "contentious" and also "bright-headed".

She had Asthma
1907 - 1976 Charley or Clive York 69 69 York is an English habitation name from the city of York in Northern England, or perhaps in some cases a regional name Ron the county of Yorkshire. 
_______________________________________________________________________________________
His father named him Charles Clive after the author of a book he was reading at the time of Charley's birth.
_______________________________________________________________________________________

He left home when he was young and rode a motorcycle across the countr
He was a great storyteller with a terrific sense of humor.
He had dark curly hair and twinkly hazel eyes.
_______________________________________________________________________________________
I am 100% sure of the following lineage:

Joseph B. York and Mary James were the parents of
James Joseph York.   James married Ida Hasseltine Seay and fathered
Charles Clive York who married Fannie Irene Bates and fathered
Betty Joe York.  Betty married James Walter White and produced moi:
Catherine Neal White.  My daughter by Adell Ward Jr is
Jennifer Denise Ward

CNW
1910 - 1992 Fannie Irene Bates 82 82 After the death of her father when she was about 13, the family was split up.  Fannie was sent to school at Rabun Gap Nacoochee in Georgia and boarded with the Richie family until she graduated. 

She was a fantastic cook!

She suffered from Osteoarthritis for years.

_______________________________________________________________________________________
I am 100% positive that the following lineage is true and correct:

Harley Anderson Bates married as his second wife Ada Elizabeth Bell and fathered
Fannie Irene Bates who married Charles Clive York and had
Betty Joe York.  Betty married James Walter White and had me!
Catherine Neal White.  My daughter by Adell Ward Jr is
Jennifer Denise Ward

CNW
Living Ward Living Ward Living Anderson Living York 1872 - 1943 James Joseph York 71 71 I am 100% sure of the following lineage:

Joseph B. York and Mary James were the parents of
James Joseph York.   James married Ida Hasseltine Seay and fathered
Charles Clive York who married Fannie Irene Bates and fathered
Betty Joe York.  Betty married James Walter White and produced moi:
Catherine Neal White.  My daughter by Adell Ward Jr is
Jennifer Denise Ward

CNW
1878 - 1965 Ida Hasseltine Seay 87 87 Ida lived with her son, Earl York in Belle Glade, FL after she divorced James Joseph York.  Until she broke her hip.

She died in a nursing home in West Palm Beach where she had been for several years prior to her death.

Always dressed nicely.  A classy lady. 

"Don't Fence Me In" was a favorite song of hers.
1889 - 1925 Harley Anderson Bates 35 35 Tombstone inscription in Coweeta Baptist Church Cemetery says:
Harley A. Bates, Born Aug 28, 1889  Died 9 January 1925  At rest with Jesus


World War I Draft Registration Card shows his birth date as August 28, 1889.  He was of medium height and medium build with brown eyes and black hair.
1886 - 1967 Ada Elizabeth Bell 80 80 Bell is most probably an English occupational name for a bell ringer or bell founder, or a habitation name for someone living "at the bell".

Ada was living with her daughter, Bessie in her brother John L. Bell's house in 1930.  George W. Bell also lived there.
1920 - 1984 Adell Ward 63 63 Private Mildred Mercer 1913 - 1984 James Russell Anderson 70 70 James had a couple of half-brothers, one of whom went to California.  The brothers were the sons of Jame's father and his second wife, a Blackfoot woman.  Names are unknown.  They also had a daughter named Polly.

Jame's father is thought to be 1/2 Swede and 1/2 Sioux.

His mother's middle name is thought to be Lucinda and she was possibly of Irish descent.  Lucinda had 2 daughters by a prior marriage.  When she was younger she drove a logging wagon pulled by a team of mules.  Apparently she was a "rip-snorter"!  She had several husbands and boyfriends and is said to have shot one of them in the foot.  She sewed another one up in a sheet while he was sleeping off a drunk and then proceeded to beat him.  It's also said that she pistol-whipped Jame's 5th grade school-teacher for spanking him. (They say James never went further than the 5th grade.)

One of his friends was Delbert Drannon.  They were in the Army together.

He worked in a steel mill at some point and was injured when a bolt fell and hit him in the head..he had a permanent indentation in his skull from that accident.

Drove tanks in South Africa in WWII (near the end of the war).  He also told a story about the soldiers having to wear their dog tags outside their shirts in plain view so the headhunters would not kill them.

His paternal grandmother was kidnapped by the Sioux.  The US Calvary rescued her and when they brought her  back she had a son fathered by an Indian warrior.  A man named Anderson later married her and raised the son, who was James' grandfather. 

When Jame's died there was some confusion before they could bury him.  The Army already had him listed as dead.  
1922 - 1999 Josephine Louella Sidle 77 77 1882 - 1935 Sherman Sidle 52 52 1882 - 1957 Bertha May Gramling 74 74 1859 - 1914 Adam Gramling 55 55 1860 - 1943 Clara Alice Hoffman 82 82 The name HOFFMAN is of German origin and refers to a farmer who owned his own land as opposed to holding it by rent or feudal obligation.
1819 - 1889 John Gramling 70 70 1833 - 1896 Sylvenia Snell 63 63 The name SNELL is an English nickname for a brisk or active person.
Living Tranguia Living Anderson Living Anderson Living Anderson Living Anderson Living Anderson Living Anderson Living Anderson Living Anderson Living White Living White Living White 1953 - 1982 James Anthony Cordell 29 29 Living White Living Spaid Living Beavers Living Cordell Living Smith Living Smith Living Williams Living Williams Living Deetz Living Deetz Living Deetz Living Buchanan 1943 - 2002 David Lee White 59 59 Living White Living White 1908 - 1975 James Grady Fortune 67 67 He was allegedly related to an ex-Governor of Florida.

He has children by another marriage.

Grady was listed as a Helper in the home of someone named CHILDS on the 1930 Census.  His parents are on the same page.
Living Fortune BET 9 MAR 1916 AND 1917 - 1986 Winford Earl York On the 1930 Census as Winford. E York and on the Florida Death Index his name is spelled Earl Wenford York.

1910 - 1983 Ralph Grover York 73 73 Ran an Antiques store in West Palm Beach, FL.

3 children?
1902 - UNKNOWN Edward Glen York BET 4 AND 5 MAY 1905 - 1999 Fred L. York 1912 - 1990 Lula Pearl York 78 78 1901 - 1989 Harry Leibovit 88 88 He used to talk about being in a "concentration camp"  when he was younger.  He had numbers tattooed on his arm.  He was Jewish.

He always had a little portable radio with him listening to the Stock Market updates.

Rumored to be a Bootlegger (from Miami to the Palm Beaches).

Owned a bar in Belle Glade, FL (The Brass Rail)

Owned a chain of hotels in Florida.




BET 2 AUG 1899 AND 1900 - 2000 Berda Nell York Living Paulk Living Paulk Living Paulk 1970 - 1990 Jeffrey Scott Paulk 20 20 Scotty committed suicide by jumping off the I-95 overpass into the Lake Worth High School parking lot. 
Living Delgado Living Delgado Living Delgado ~1880 - UNKNOWN John White He had red hair.  (?)

Flem's father was supposed to be of Native American descent from somewhere around the Great Lakes area.  Menominee or something like that, according to Albert White.  (Mom says she thinks it was his mother who was Native American instead of the father but can't remember for sure).

The following is 100% true and accurate:

Flem White and Maggie White (White was her maiden name) were the parents of
Albert White.  Albert married Bessie Kelley and fathered
James Walter White who married Betty Joe York and fathered me:
Catherine Neal White.  My daughter by Adell Ward Jr is
Jennfier Denise Ward








~1880 - UNKNOWN Mary Magdaline ? May be part Indian from around the Great Lakes area.

According to SS5, White was her Maiden name.

The following is 100% true and accurate:

Flem White and Maggie White (White was her maiden name) were the parents of
Albert White.  Albert married Bessie Kelley and fathered
James Walter White who married Betty Joe York and fathered me:
Catherine Neal White.  My daughter by Adell Ward Jr is
Jennfier Denise Ward
BET 1860 AND 1863 - BET 1921 AND 1930 Charles Walter Kelley 1910 Census has a Lodger by the name of James Magruder living with Charles and Lillie as well as Lillie's 7 year old  niece, Ollie M. Standard.


1889 - 1968 Lillie Belle Standard 79 79 Moved to Carlsbad, New Mexico with her daughter, Mamie & family.

1910 Census has Ollie M. Standard, niece, 7 years old, living with Charles and Lillie.  There was also a lodger by the name of James Magruder living with them at that time. I suspect that this was actually James Magruder Standard, Lillie's brother.

1930 Census shows Lillie was widowed, head of the household and her 3 children living with her in Vicksburg.


D. UNKNOWN Ruby ? Private Greadle Sparks Private Mary Lou ? 1894 - UNKNOWN Chili or Chillie Viola York D. UNKNOWN Edward Hall HALL.  English, German, Danish/Norwegian and Swedish topographic name for someone who lived near a large house, or occupational name for someone employed at a hall or manor.  Some cases may be habitation names from towns with this word, in particular Halle in the south-west corner of East Germany. 1905 - 1996 Katherine M. York 90 90 D. UNKNOWN Herbert Rogers 1913 - 1989 Howard Albert O'Berg 76 76 1915 - 2002 Ida Belle York 86 86 D. UNKNOWN Richard Roscoe Ledford D. UNKNOWN Lee Burrell ~1890 - UNKNOWN Greene Calloway 1914 - 2004 Florence Magalene Bates 90 90 Member of Black Mountain Baptist Church. D. 1994 Bob Stamey Private Katherine Virginia Bates 1913 - 1983 David Joshua Stockton 70 70 1916 - 1996 Ray Delania Bates 79 79 1919 - 1993 James Wilson Bates 74 74 BET 1920 AND 1925 - UNKNOWN Bernadette Bates Died as an infant. 1921 - 1999 Bessie Pauline Bates 77 77 D. UNKNOWN Maggie Garland 1904 - 1986 Annie Mae Bates 82 82 Double Stone in Coweeta Baptist Church Cemetery:
Tallent,  Annie Mae Tallent 1904-1986   J. Harve Tallent 1891-1969
1890 - 1969 John Harvey Tallent 78 78 Ancestry - Katherine Carradine's tree 1830 - 1914 Joseph Bowens York 83 83 Tombstone in Persimmon Baptist Church Cemetery:
J. B. York;05 Nov 1830 - 29 May 1914;
"His toils are past, his work is done, he fought the fight,
the victory won."; Foot Stone, "J.B.Y."

York, J. B. -- Private - September 8, 1862. Pension records
show he was at home on sick furlough close of war.
from:
RABUN COUNTY, GA - MILITARY  - Civil War  Co.E 24TH Regiment
"Rabun Gap Riflemen"
Copyright.  All rights reserved.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm
This file was contributed for use in the USGenWeb
Archives by: Virginia Crilley varcsix@@hot.rr.com
Company E, 24th Regiment
Rabun County
"Rabun Gap Riflemen"

Grandpa (Charles Clive York) used to tell us that his grandfater Joseph was shot in the leg during the Civil War. 

A List of children of other woman
not widows as above disscribed
as of wives of Soldiers now in Survice
for Instance who are under twelve
years of age who have not the
means of Support.
Persimmon District
NameNumber of Children
Joseph York             "     5

YORK, J. B. (Joseph Bowens York), born 5 Nov 1830, s/o Jeremiah and Margaret Donaldson York; married/1: Mary S. Carnes; married/2: Mary A. James; CSA Service: Enlisted 8 Sept 1862, Co. E, 24th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Rabun Gap Riflemen, Pri. Pension records show he was at home on sick furlough close of war; died 29 Jul 1914, buried at Persimmon Baptist Church Cem., Rabun Co., GA. (Marian Miller)  http://www.usgennet.org/usa/region/southeast/garabun/civilwar/cwsursz.html  - The Civil War in Rabun County GA, Index of Soldiers

The records of the Georgia Department of Archives and History contains a list of some 300 men, "Names of Men Subject to Military Duty in Rabun County in 1862" which includes J. B. York.

_______________________________________________________________________________________
I am 100% sure of the following lineage:

Joseph B. York and Mary James were the parents of
James Joseph York.   James married Ida Hasseltine Seay and fathered
Charles Clive York who married Fannie Irene Bates and fathered
Betty Joe York.  Betty married James Walter White and produced moi:
Catherine Neal White.  My daughter by Adell Ward Jr is
Jennifer Denise Ward

CNW



 
1846 - 1940 Mary M. James 93 93 Mary's father was born in North Carolina according to the 1880 census.

Tombstone in Persimmon Baptist Church Cemetery:
Mary James York; 19 Sep 1846 - 03 Apr 1940

PAGE 53
A List of Woman Wheither they are the
Wives of Soldiers or whos sons or other
person upon Whom they have usually
depended for Support heretofore has died
been killed disabled or is then absent
in the millitary Survice and who are
Indigent and have not the means of
Support
Persimon Dist.
Mrs. Joseph York

A List of children of other woman
not widows as above disscribed
as of wives of Soldiers now in Survice
for Instance who are under twelve
years of age who have not the
means of Support.
Persimmon District
NameNumber of Children
Joseph York             "     5

RABUN CO., GA - SALT LISTS - Salt list, January 23, 1863
====================================================================
Submitted by Dawn Watson


Inferior Court Minutes (County Purposes), 1860 - 1869, Rabun Co., GA

PAGE 74
The names of women whos husband [is] in the Confederate Army
2.  Mary York                four children





1802 - 1888 Jeremiah York 86 86 From Deeds and Land Records, Rabun Co, GAGenWeb:

Deed Book A, p. 159 (transcribed to Book R, p. 109) Deed dated 29 Dec. 1827, recorded 10 Jul. 1828, from John W. Towns, Rabun Co., GA, to Jeremiah York, Rabun Co., GA, conveyed 490 acres, Lot 43, First District, for $300. Witnesses: Jonathan S. Hogue and John S. Stanley. Signed: John W. Towns. (MM1)

Deed Book A, p. 240 (transcribed to Book R, p. 181) Deed dated 9 May 1830, recorded 5 Apr. 1831, from Jeremiah York, to Jeffry York, Rabun Co., GA conveyed South half of Lot 43, First District, for $150. Witnesses: Elijah Brady and John Patterson. Signed: Jeremiah York. (MM1)
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Tombstone in Persimmon Baptist Church Cemetery:
Jeremiah York; 16 Dec 1802 - 20 Dec 1888; "In Memory of"
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Excerpted from "Sketches of Rabun County History" (reprinted in 1959) by Andrew Jackson Ritchie:

          "The only children of Seymour York were three sons - Jeremiah, John and Jeffry.  The oldest son, Jeremiah, was born in 1802 and died in 1888, at the age of 86 years. He was about 21 years of age when the family came to this county.  On December 29, 1827, he purchased from John W. Towns of Talliaferro County lot 43 in the Persimmon district, containing 490 acres, at the price of $300.  He married Margaret Dollison, who died in 1870 at the age of 65 years.  All of his children were from this marriage.  There were three daughters.  Caroline married Alfred Keener.  They moved to Texas.  Margaret married L. C. Hollifield, who was for several terms Clerk of the Superior Court.  Adeline married Lee Pinner of the Persimmon district.  Late in his life Jeremiah York married Polly Ann Moore.  He was a Justice of the Peace and a deacon in the Baptist Church.  He is buried in the old Persimmon cemetery. 
     The sons for Jeremiah York were John Marion, Martin V., Cicero, the Rev. W. S. York and Joseph B. York.  The two families of John Marion York and Martin V. York are more widely known than the others.  These two men were reared on the old plantation in the Persimmon district and spent all of their lives there."

List of Slave Owners in Rabun County in 1862 includes Jeremiah York with 1 slave and his mother Miriam owned 4.
 


1837 - 1867 Mary S. Arrendale 29 29 ~1857 - UNKNOWN Galveston York ~1861 - UNKNOWN Safrona York Her first name looks like it's spelled Sophrona in the 1880 census.
~1862 - UNKNOWN Cicero York ~1864 - UNKNOWN Adaline York 1805 - 1870 Margaret Donelson or Dollison? 65 65 Last name may have been Donaldson or Dollison.

Tombstone in Persimmon Baptist Church Cemetery:
Margaret York; 25 Jan 1805 - 10 Dec 1870; "In Memory Of"

YORK, W. S. (William Seymore York), born 15 Apr 1823, Rabun Co., GA, s/o Jeremiah and Margaret Donaldson York; married: Nancy A. Coffee; CSA Service: Enlisted Jan. 1863, Co. F. 52d Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Army of Tennessee, C.S.A., Rabun County, GA Beauregard Braves, Pvt.; died 12 Feb 1879, buried at Persimmon Baptist Church Cem., Rabun Co., GA. (Marian Miller)  http://www.usgennet.org/usa/region/southeast/garabun/civilwar/cwsursz.html




1823 - 1879 Reverend 55 55 1825 - 1908 Nancy Coffee 83 83 1829 - UNKNOWN John Marion York D. UNKNOWN Rachel D. Jones 1833 - UNKNOWN Adeline York D. UNKNOWN Lee Pinner 1835 - 1862 Elisha Newton York 27 27 1836 - 1908 Mary Margaret York 72 72 1830 - 1917 Lorenzo Crayton Hollifield 87 87 Last name may be Hallifield. 1839 - 1916 Martin Van Buren York 77 77 1839 - 1915 Sarah Ann Hopper 75 75 1842 - UNKNOWN Caroline York 1822 - UNKNOWN Alfred Keener Last name may be Kerner. 1845 - 1919 Cicero C. York 74 74 ~1849 - 1924 Pelonia E. Kerby 75 75 D. UNKNOWN William Donaldson ~1777 - BET 1857 AND 1859 Seymour (Semore) York 1850 Slave Schedule for Rabun Co, GA shows Seamore York owning:
1 black female age 45
1 black male age 37
1 black female age 14
1 black male age 10
1 black male age 7
1 black male age 5


From Deeds and Land Records Rabun Co, GaGenWeb:

Deed Book C, p. 30 (transcribed to Book Q, p. 540) Deed dated 8 Jun. 1841, recorded 15 Jun 1841, from Allen R. Gaines, Administrator, Estate of Benjamin O'Neill, of Rabun Co., GA, to Semore York, Rabun Co., GA, conveyed north part of Lots 8 and 9, Second District, and 25 acres, being the northeast corner of Lots 21, Fifth District, Rabun Co., GA for $355. Witnesses: James Bleckley and John York. Signed: A. R. Gaines (MM1)

Deed Book A, p. 125 (transcribed to Book R, p. 78) Deed dated 10 Jan. 1826, recorded 23 Aug. 1826, from Lazarus Tilley and Sarah Tilley, his wife, Rabun Co., GA, to Semore York, Rabun Co., GA, conveyed 304½ acres, Lots 18, 11, 17, Second District, for $600. Witnesses: George Crawford and Elisha Wellborn, J.P. Signed: Lazarus Tilley and Sarah Tilley. (MM1)
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Excerpted from "Sketches of Rabun County History" (reprinted in 1959) by Andrew Jackson Ritchie:

    "In the back of the old musty volume, Book A, in the record of deeds we find that as early as 1818, a year before Rabun County was created by the Legislature, the old Jeffry Bek on his plantation in the Pickensville district of South Carolina was writing a will which was afterwards recorded as a deed.  In this instrument he says that he has given his lands to his sons and is undertaking to give two of his six negroes to his daughter Miriam and her husband, Seymour York.  Thus Seymour York was a brother in law of the noted Colonel Sam Beck.  He was then married and was living in South Carolina.
     The next we see of this mans in the recrods of deeds which show that on June 10, 1826 he purchased from Lazarus Tilley of Rabun County parts of land lots 11, 17 and 18 on Scott's Creek west of Clayton, containing 300 acres, at the price of $600.  Here Seymour York made his home and reared his family.  He built a corn mill on the creek.  The heavy sills of locust timber are still there, and the mill has been in use until recently.  This man was thus the patriarch of all the Yorks in Rabun County, so far as we know."
     The only children of Seymour York were three sons - Jeremiah, John and Jeffry."

Grand Juror, April term 1829.
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BET 1777 AND 1780 - BET 1859 AND 1860 Meriam Beck Family Data Collection - Births Record, Ancestry.com
Miriam Beck born 1780 in VA daughter of Jeffrey Beck and Mary Molly McDaniel

Family Data Collection - Deaths Record, Ancestry.com
Miriam Beck died 1859 in Rabun county, GA

"Sketches of Rabun County History" by Andrew Jackson Ritchie (see note in Miriam's Father's file regarding her inheritance).  "On January 1, 1860, the mother, Miriam York, widow of Seymour York, agreed with her three sons, Jeremiah, Jeffry and John, on a division of the Seymour York estate.  Jeffry was allotted some of the land on Scott's Creek.  The balance went mostly to John York."

List of Slave Owners in Rabun County in 1862 includes Jeremiah York with 1 slave and his mother Miriam owned 4.

Beck is an English topographic name for someone who lived beside a stream.  Also an English (Norman) habitation name form any of the various places in Northern France, for example Bec Hellouin in Eure.






~1753 - 1835 Jeremiah York 82 82 1790 Federal Census for Randolph County, NC shows Jeremiah York as head of household with 4 free white males under the age of 16 and 5 free white females.

At the period of the insurrection of the Regulators and it's tragic aftermath John Aldred or Alred must have been in full sympathy with those who opposed official tyranny. There is preserved one Petition from a group of his neighbors, and he on behalf of Thomas Welborn, who appears to have come under investigation for his part in the struggle. Among those signing this testimonial were these: SEMORE YORK, JEREMIAH YORK, Tidence Lane, John Lance, JOHN ALREAD, Shubal Stearnes. (Colonial records of North Carolina (25-26)
~1780 - BET 1810 AND 1824 Sarah Allred I'm a bit uncomfortable with Sarah's ancestry and the dates I have for her.  I haven't found reliable documentation for anything I've found on her online.  This needs work.





1723 - 1792 John Allred 69 69 In 1755 entered a land warrant in Orange County, NC for 640 acres of land on the east side of Deep River, on the mouth of Mount Pleasant Run on Sandy Creek, and included both his and Thomas Alldrid's improvements.  The land had previously been entered by John McDaniel.  This warrant was entered the 15th of March 1755. (fr www.allredroster.com)

Orange County Tax Records, 1755 and 1772. (John Alred)

Will dated 1792 names children John, Joseph, Jonathan, Elizabeth Horner, Catherine Julian, Susannah Guren, Barbara York and unmarried daughters Lidy, Rebecca, Margaret, Mary and Sarah.  It is possible that Joseph, Jonathan and Sarah were children of another marriage. (Jerry McCoy's tree at Ancestry.com)

Recognized as a DAR patriot, for patriotic service in North Carolina.


BET 1723 AND 1739 - 1801 Margaret Cheney Margaret's name may be Lillian Margaret Cheney.  Also called Peggy.

There may be some doubt about the validity of a marriage between John Allred and Margaret Cheney (fr www.allredroster.com)
1720 - 1804 Francis Cheney 84 84 He first appears in 1759 in the record of Lord Granville granting James Chaney some land in Orange [now, Randolph] Co., NC. He, in 1762, was also granted land. (The Randolph County, North Carolina, Deed Book 8, p368, records that the Earl of Granville, K.G., granted 400 acres of Orange County to Francis Chaney on 39 June 1762. The land was on the Richland Creek of the waters of Deep River.) Tax lists record him and Francis, Jr., a son who would move to Kentucky then Tennessee. Also, there is John Chaney, another son. His daughter, Margaret, married into the Allred family. In 1804, Francis was deeding land to her, her son (Jonathan Allred) and to John Chaney. This appears to indicate that he might have been reaching the end of his active life and was passing his property to his heirs before he died. However, this is only speculation.
The number of children he and Sarah had is uncertain although the twenty year difference between John and Margaret suggests that several more children were probably born. ---Jesse Gerald Chaney, Sr.


Several records have been located which seem to locate this Francis Chaney in North Carolina although earlier records indicate that he was possibly born about 1700 in New Kent Co., Virginia. However, this preparer feels that that Francis Chaney is too old. (Most ot the content of the following is quoted from the correspondence of Jesse Gerald Chaney.) Note that although the records are of Randolph County, when the transactions were recorded, the area was then part of Orange County.

Francis appears on the 1755 Tax REcords for Orange Co, NC (as Francis Chancy).

Randolph County, NC, Deed Book 8, page 368: A grant of 400 acres from the Earl of Granville, K.G., to Francis Chaney of Orange County, in the Province of North Carolina, on Richland Creek of the Waters of Deep River, 30 June, 1762.

Francis signed the Regulator petition of Governor William Tryon in 1768 and fought in the Battle of Alamance in 1771.  Colonial Records from NC, Orange Co, NC- Misc-Regulators

In the same Deed Book 8, page 232: Francis Chaney, for love and affection to his daughter, Margaret Allred, one hundred Acres, 26 April, 1801. (John Chaney, in his application for a Revolutionary War pension, named his sister, Margaret Allred.)

On the same page 232: Francis Chaney, for love and goodwill, to his grandson Jonathan Allred, one hundred acres on the Weste End of his land on one fork of Richland Creek 26 April 1801.

On page 431: Francis Chaney, for love and goodwill, to Margaret Alred, his daughter, one hundred acres lying on the waters of Richland Creek as well more fully appear by applying the old original deed given to said Francis Chaney by the Earl of Granville, 2 October, 1804.

On pages 500 and 501: Francis Chaney Sr., Francis Chaney Jr., Michael Harvey Sr., Margaret Alred, and Margarett Stillwell to John Chaney, for one hundred pounds, one hundred acres on the waters of Richland Creek, 27 September 1804. (This John Chaney is certainly the son of Francis Chaney, Sr., who, in an application for a Revolutionary War pension in 1833 in Greene Co., IN, reported that his father was Francis Chaney and his sister was Margaret Allred.)

These documents seem to indicate that Francis Chaney (Sr.) was dispensing his property. This suggests that he was considering his death. Whether he was ill or aged is not clear. No record of his death, nor any other transactions nor legal records, have been found after this year, 1804. ---Jesse Gerald Chaney, Sr. & Charles C. Chaney;

1790 Federal Census for 1790 show Francis Chaney Sr. as head of household.

BET 1719 AND 1730 - >1757 Sarah Aurick 1706 - 1792 John Arledge 86 86 John Allred and wife, Anne Hamilton, came to Orange County, NC about 1750.  Randolph County was later formed from portions of Orange and Rowan Counties.  On March 15, 1755 he received a land grant from the Crown for a tract of land on Sandy Creek.

John was married twice.  His first wife is Unknown.  Thomas and William were possibly children of the previous marriage.

Moved to Frederick Co, VA by 1745; Camden Dist, SC by 1749.  ???
............................................................................................................................................................................

John’s Will

(transcribed as written)
from http://www.allredfamily.org/johnstranscribedwill.html


In the name of God, Amen. I John Allred of Randolph County and State of North Carolina being sick and weak in body though of perfect mind and memory thanks be to God for it calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die do make ordain constitute and appoint this my last will and testament in manner following declaring this only to be my last will and testament utterly revoking and disavowing all other wills and testaments by me made and in the first place recommending my Soul to God who gave it nothing doubting but I shall receive the same again at the last day by the mighty power of God and my body to be buried in a decent Christian manner at the discretion of my Executor and my just debts and funeral charges to be paid.

Item I give and bequeath to my son John Allred the sum of forty shillings to be paid out of my estate

Item I give and bequeath to my son Joseph Allred one half of my land to wit the upper part containing one hundred and twenty five acres. I give to my son Joseph one cow

Item I give and bequeath to my son Jonathan Allred the other half of my land including the dwelling home.

Item I give to my said son Jonathan one cow

Item I give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Horner the sum of ten shillings to be raised out of my estate.

Item I give and bequeath to my daughter Catherine Julian the sum of ten shillings to be raised out of my estate.

Item I give and bequeath to my daughter Susannah Guren the sum of ten shillings to be raised out of my estate.

Item I give and bequeath to my daughter Lidy one cow

Item I give and bequeath to my daughter Rebecca one cow

Item I give and bequeath to my daughter Margaret one mare coult and likewise my bed and bedstead and one cow and likewise ten pounds to be raised out of my estate and my will further is that my negroe man and my horses and the remainder of my cattle exclusive of what is mentioned in the will shall be sold and the money summing there from to be equally divided amongst the following children to wit Joseph Allred, Jonothan Allred, Barbara York, Sarah Allred, Mary Allred, Liddy Allred, Rebecca Allred and Margaret Allred and further I do constitute and appoint Renny Julien and Isaac Julien Executors to this my last will and testament in witness whereof I have set my hand and seal the fifteenth day of September 1792.

Signed and Sealed and pronounced his

in the presence of John Allred (Seal)

Isaac Odell mark

John Duncan

Enoch Davis

---------------

State of North Carolina

Randolph County

December Term 1792

It having been certified to the Court that John Allred is dead and hath made his last will and testament in writing a copy of which is hereunto annexed - Renny Julian and Isaac Julian - Executors in said will named qualified accordingly. These are therefore authorized and impower the said Executors to act as such observing the directions of the act of assembly in that case made and provided. Given at the Clerks offices in Randolph the second Monday of December Anno Domi 1792 in the 7 year of our Independence.

I Harper CC
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Land Records:

John received his first land grant March 15, 1755.  Unfortunately, the original paper work for this land grant is in such horrible shape that it is only available for viewing via microfilm now.  As you can see, it's very hard to read.  However, we do have the following description of this original land grant taken from the book Orange County Records, Volume I, Granville Proprietary Land Office, Abstracts of Loose Papers edited by William D. Bennett.  This book is on file in the Genealogy Room of the NC State Archives.  On page 12, you'll find: 

Allrid, John        Warrent        15 March 1755

640 acres on east side Deep River, on mouth of Mount Pleasant Run of Sandy Run; includes his and Thomas Alldrid's improvements; heretofore entered by John McDaniel.

Entered 15 March 1755

Surveyed 2 May 1755

Deed 15 March 1756

Another description of the same land comes from the book (page 50) Orange County Records, Vol. V, Granville Proprietary Land Office, Deeds and Surveys, 1752-1760 edited by William D. Bennett, C. G. also on file in the Genealogy Room, NC State Archives, Raleigh, NC:

148.  15 March 1756, John Alred, planter, ten shillings, on both sides Mount Pleasant Creek, begin at a black oak, N crossing the creek 65 ch. to a black oak, E crossing the creek 80 ch. to a white oak, S 65 ch. to a white oak, W 80 ch. to first station, 520 acres, twenty shillings ten pence rent per year, surveyed 2 May 1755, Thos. Allred and Herman Husbands, SCC (SSLG 83-C) (Ed. note: see also N. C. Patent Book 14:332)

We also have this plat map which was attached to the original land grant.

Using this information we have been able to pin-point exactly where John's land was located.  Using today's map of North Carolina, locate Asheboro (Randolph County) in the center of the state.  Follow HWY 64 East from Asheboro to Ramseur.  Go north on HWY 22 about 1 1/2 miles, turn right on Patterson Grove Church Road.  Go 3 miles, turn left on Academy Road (at the church).  Go 1/2 mile and you'll find a bridge which crosses Sandy Creek.  Get out and walk 1/2 way across the bridge looking to your north.  About 50 yards north of the bridge you'll see the "mouth" of Mt. Pleasant Creek as it branches away from Sandy Creek.  Per the descriptions in the land grants, this is where John was living in 1755.  John's younger brother, Thomas, was living with him at that time.  To our knowledge, John remained on this land and is most likely buried on it somewhere.  His grave has not been found. 

From http://www.allredfamily.org/johnslandrecords.htm

In May 1740, CLEMENT ARLEDGE obtained an attachment against the Estate of JOHN ARLEDGE for nine hundred pounds of tobacco.

On 15 March 1755 is recorded a "Grant from Earl Granville to JOHN ALDRED of Orange Co., N.C., of 640 acres. Entry 154. No. 01128.

On 15 March 1756 there was a "Grant to JOHN ALDRED or ALRED of 520 acres on both sides of Mt. Pleasant Creek.  Grant No31 File No 325 Orange Co Grant Book ? (14:332)

At the period of the insurrection of the Regulators and it's tragic aftermath John Aldred or Alred must have been in full sympathy with those who opposed official tyranny. There is preserved one Petition from a group of his neighbors, and he on behalf of Thomas Welborn, who appears to have come under investigation for his part in the struggle. Among those signing this testimonial were these: SEMORE YORK, JEREMIAH YORK, Tidence Lane, John Lance, JOHN ALREAD, Shubal Stearnes. (Colonial records of North Carolina (25-26)

Randolph County was formed from Orange County and Rowan County, (Guilford Co. from Orange and Rowan, 1771; Randolph Co. From Guilford, 1779), and this included the Sandy Creek Settlement. It is probable that JOHN died before 1779, but the date of his death is uncertain.

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The Rape of Lydia Allred

A Research Report

By: Linda Allred Cooper

Whenever we think of the "good ole days" we tend to forget that some of the horrors we associate with today’s world sometimes happened back then too. The story of Lydia Allred is one such case.

Lydia was born in Orange County, North Carolina in 1770. She was one of the younger children of John Allred who settled in North Carolina in the 1750’s. Lydia was raised on the family farm located near today’s Patterson Grove community just north of Franklinville, NC. In 1779 this same land became part of the newly formed Randolph County.

Most of the time Lydia’s neighbors were law abiding. Court documents from that time period show that there were occasional visits to court to complain about a missing cow or hog and a few accusations of theft of farm equipment, but, for the most part, life was peaceful. One important exception to that rule was the Lewis family.

John and Priscilla Lewis raised a large family on their land located just north of today’s Franklinville. This family, especially the boys and men, were well known as mean, tough, belligerent bullies. They made their own rules, followed no laws but their own and beat or killed anyone who made them mad. One account taken from the book "The Randolph Story" on file in the Randolph Room, Asheboro Public Library states:

The Lewises were tall, broad, muscular and very powerful men. The family were the lions of the country. Their character was eminently pugnacious. Nearly all of them drank to intoxication; aware of power, they insulted whom they listed; they sought occasions of quarrel as a Yankee does gold in California. They rode through plantations; killed their neighbor’s cattle; took fish from other men’s traps; said what they pleased; all more for contention than gain. Though the opposed had power, they were afraid to prosecute them, they knew these human hydras had no mercy; they dreaded their retaliating vengeance. Anything, man or beast, that crossed their path periled it’s life. The neither sheltered themselves under the strong arm of the law nor permitted others to do so, they neither gave nor asked mercy. Their pledge was sure as anything human could be. If they threatened death or torture, those threatened always thought it prudent to retire to the very uttermost part of the earth.

Stephen Lewis, the fifth child of John and Priscilla, was born June 4, 1757. (1) Per Lewis family documents, he fought and bullied his way into adulthood. In the 1770’s he began appearing in court, charged with a variety of theft, assaults and battery. More times, than not, the court found him not-guilty, no doubt fearing retaliation from him or his family. On the few occasions he was found guilty, he was usually fined some small amount which was never collected.

This pattern continued on into the mid 1780’s. Between March and October 1786, Stephen and his brother, John, had been in court 11 different times (2) answering a variety of charges. One of those charges was brought by Lydia’s father, John, who accused John Lewis of assault in June 1786. (3) John Lewis was found innocent and John Allred became the target of some vicious retaliation.

The Allred family found themselves confronted by the Lewis family over the next few months. Farm equipment disappeared. Farm animals were slaughtered. When the family members went to visit neighbors, they were followed and taunted. Finally, on a sunny afternoon in October, it all came "to a head".

October 30th no doubt began as a normal day on the farm. Chores were performed, meals were cooked and served by the women while the men worked in the fields. The colorful fall leaves were falling and the weather had a slight "nip in the air". When her chores were finished, Lydia decided to walk the well worn wagon path to her sister and brother-in-law’s home, Barbara and William York. Barbara was 17, only one year older than Lydia and a newly wed. The sisters were close and no doubt missing each other’s daily company. A visit would be welcome.

The court document filed November 6, 1786 tells the story in chilling detail. Lydia was walking along the path when Stephen Lewis rode up on his horse. He, no doubt, recognized her as one of John Allred’s daughters. Lewis got off of his horse and grabbed Lydia, pulling her to him roughly and forcing her onto his lap as he sat down on a log. Holding her tightly, he asked her to have "carnal knowledge" with him. She refused, telling him she would rather die and tried to fight her way free of his clutches. Angered, he forced his hand under her skirt and "placed his hand on her privates and forced his fingers into her body". She fought valiantly, but he was bigger and stronger than the frightened 16 year old girl. He pushed her to the ground and violently beat and raped her.

When finished, Lewis left Lydia lying on the path and rode off. She pulled herself together and somehow managed to get to her sister’s home. As you can imagine, the family reacted in horror and demanded justice. On November 6, Lydia’s father, brothers and brother-in-laws came to court to file charges (4) against Stephen Lewis.

Unfortunately, as in the past, the court continued to be reluctant to indict or convict anyone in the Lewis family of anything - even something as horrible as rape. Court records show that although the Allred family presented overwhelming evidence and Lydia herself was forced to testify in detail about the rape, little was done to Stephen Lewis. Finally, in December, the court agrees to indict Lewis (5 & 6) and hold a trial. However, the intimidated jurors and court officials, fearing reprisals from the Lewis family, vote to post-pone the trial until Spring 1787. They were probably hoping that, with the new court session, they would not be chosen as jurors and would escape the Lewis family wrath.

On February 1, 1787, Stephen Lewis was back in court (7) accused of threatening the life of Lydia’s father, John. He had already beat John, breaking his nose, and continued to harass the family every chance he got. John asked the court for protection. It wasn’t awarded until another week passed. In response, Stephen and his family increased their campaign of harassment and terror.

Finally, in March 1787, the court imposes a 100 pound bond on Lewis (8) to guarantee his appearance in court for trial.  But, the trial is post-poned once again as the Lewis family’s threats scare the jurors. By June, Lydia’s father had reached his limit and begins fighting back. However, he accomplishes nothing except getting himself arrested (9) for "profane swearing in public". The humiliation must have been unbearable as John is arrested for "swearing" while his daughter’s rapist still roamed free. While in court facing the original "swearing" charge, John loses his temper again and swears at the court officials. Again he is charged and fined.

The rape trial is post-poned again and again as the jurors and court officials were harassed by the Lewis family. Court documents also show that the Lewis brothers were in court many times (10) over the next 4 years as they continued to wreak havoc in Randolph County. But, as we’ve all heard, "you reap what you sow" and eventually everyone pays for the evil they do.

When Stephen raped Lydia, he was married. Lewis family records show that he beat his wife on a regular basis, treating her no better than he did his neighbors. Finally, in 1791, Stephen’s brother, Richard, helped Stephen’s wife escape and hid her outside of the county at the home of a friend. Richard was no better than Stephen, so this unusual act of kindness was rare. Stephen and Richard argued violently about the beatings, and finally Richard agreed to return Stephen’s wife if he would promise to quit beating her. Stephen refused. Eventually he found his wife and dragged her back home, beating her severally. Stephen then went to his brother’s home intending to kill him. Richard, seeing Stephen approach, grabbed his shot gun and ran upstairs. As Stephen climbed the stairs looking for Richard, Richard shot and wounded him. The family gathered around and soon Stephen was sent back home patched up, but very angry.

As Stephen laid at home recovering from the gun-shot wound, he swore to everyone in hearing distance that he would kill his brother as soon as he was healed. Richard, knowing Stephen fully intended to carry out this threat, finally decided to end the feud once and for all. He rode to Stephen’s house, crept quietly to the back of the house where he knew Stephen was recovering. As he looked through a crack in the wall, he could see Stephen sitting up in bed having his wound dressed. Richard stuck the barrel of the gun through the crack in the wall and shot his brother through the heart, killing him instantly.

Lydia, in the meantime, never recovered emotionally from the rape. She became a recluse, painfully shy, never wanting to go out in public or leave the confines of home. Her father, John, died in 1792 knowing that his daughter’s rapist had finally paid for his crimes. After John died, Lydia moved in with her sister, Barbara, and her family where she lived until her death.
from http://www.allredfamily.org/lydiareport.htm 
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Other Sources:
Historical Southern Families, Vol X, Allred (Aldridge) of North Carolina, Page 82.
1755 Tax List for Orange Co, NC




~1709 - UNKNOWN Virginia Annie Hamilton Hamilton is a Scots and N. Irish habitation name, ultimately not from the town of Hamilton near Glasgow, but from what is now a deserted village in the parish of Barkby, Leics.  However, some bearers may derive their name from the town founded by the Hamiltons, rather than from being members of the Norman family.

~1727 - 1783 Semore York 56 56 Semore York was a loyal British subject.  He is recorded in the Colonial North Carolina records as Seymoure, Seymour, and Cemore York. 

Rev. Shubal Stearns established the Sandy Creek Baptist Church in 1756 on land donated by Semore York. 

This information on Semore York was provided by Dennis R. York, Jr. with sources from him given as "Ten Sons of Oliver pp 113-127 by Solon P. Crain and Marguerite Starr Crain; A History of North Carolina Baptists 1727-1932 by M.A. Huggins; History of North Carolina Baptists by George Washington Paschal; York Families of Randolph County North Carolina by Dennis York; Genealogical files of Dennis York; Randolph County will books and tax lists, and U.S. Census record; North Carolina Colonial Records.

Semore York pp 529 Randolph County History Book item 643.

Semore York (ca 1727-1783) was a loyal British subject, born in England about 1727 along with his brothers Henry, John, and perhaps Thomas York. Semore is also recorded in the Colonial North Carolina records as Seymore, Seymoure, and Cemore York. Their father Jeremiah York had emigrated from England with his family into the Pipe Creek settlement of Maryland between Baltimore and Philadelphia in the early 1700's. By 1750 Jeremiah York and his three sons Henry, John, and Semore had migrated into Granville County, NC, in what is now Randolph County, NC. Thomas York had also migrated into Granville County, NC.


The great awaking or Great Revival began about 1726 in New England. Mr. Shubal Stearns, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, was bred a Presbyterian, but embraced the Baptist principles in Tolland, Connecticut. He was ordained March 20, 1751, by elders of Stonington and New London, Conn., as a Separatists Baptist minister. The Philadelphia Association appointed in 1755 two ministers to visit North Carolina "in the interest of evangelism." Rev. Shubal Stearns and Rev. Daniel Marshall with a few families came to Orange County, North Carolina, from Cacapon near Winchester in Hampshire County, Virginia, in the fall following General Braddock's defeat in November 1755. The Stearns and the York's all settled in the Sandy Creek and Mount Pleasant Creek region of what is now northeast Randolph County. Rev. Shubal Stearns established the Sandy Creek Baptist Church in 1756 on land donated by Semore York.

As soon as they arrived, a little meetinghouse was built in 1756 with sixteen members. This was followed by the organization of the Sandy Creek Association in 1758. Then a house of 30 feet by 26 feet was built in 1762 with about 40 families. One of their exhorters was Tidence Lane.

"It was the mother church, nay the grandmother church, and a great grand mother to 42 churches from which sprang 125 ministers. All the separate Baptists sprang hence; not only eastward toward the sea, but westward to Tennessee, not only towards the great river Mississippi, but northward to Virginia and southward to South Carolina and Georgia" according to Morgan Edwards' 1772 notebook.

Some of the Baptists were involved in the Regulator movement that later resulted in the Battle of Alamance on May 16, 1776. Rev. Shubal Stearns and the Sandy Creek Association threatened to excommunicate members who disturbed the peace as Regulators. But feelings for freedom from oppression ran very deep. The Sandy Creek Church reduced from 616 to fourteen souls following the defeat at the Battle of Alamance and persecution of the Regulators by Governor Tryon.

Morgan Edwards wrote, "It is said that 1500 families departed since the Battle of Alamance and a great many more are waiting to follow.  "It is from this historical event and origin that the Southern Baptist and Primitive Baptist formed their beginnings and had their greatest missionary growth throughout the South.

Soon after the Battle of Alamance, Rev. Shubal Sterns died 20 November 1771 and was buried in the Sandy Creek Baptist Church Cemetery. There is a rough, stone grave marker nearby in the same cemetery for Semore York. It reads "S Y, 8 Feb 1783" and is only a few feet northeast from the original church building site. The will of Semore York was probated in Randolph County in March 1783.

The North Carolina Colonial Records indicate Semore York was very active in the Revolutionary War activities and events leading up to our Independence. On January 10, 1776, Governor Josiah Martin, last royal governor of North Carolina, issued the order:  To William Fields, James Hunter, Robert Fields, Jeremiah Fields, and Seymoure York, Esquires of the County of Guilford; Greetings:  I hereby grant to you power and authority to form the forces you shall so raise, into companies of fifty men each, and to appoint one Captain, …and I do hereby give you full power and authority to seize and take whatsoever may be necessary of arms, ammunition, provisions, horses, and carriage for the subsistence and accommodation of His Majesty's faithful subjects"

Semore York was a loyalist Tory, and served a British Captain.  He led a company of 34 men into the battle of Moore's Creek Bridge near Wilmington, North Carolina, on February 27, 1776. The battle lasted three minutes.  Thirty of the Tories were killed or mortally wounded and between 20 and 30 taken prisoners, among whom was his Excellency General Donald Macdonald, the aged Highlander and sick leader of the Tories.

The Engagement at the Bridge

When Lillington arrived at the bridge on the 25th, he quickly saw the position's defensive advantages. The creek, a dark, sluggish, stream about 35 feet wide, wound through swampy terrain and could be crossed in the vicinity of only over this bridge. To dominate the crossing, Lillington built a low earthwork on a slight rise overlooking the bridge and its approach from the east. Joining Lillington the next day, Caswell sent his men across the bridge to throw up earthworks there. Thus by the evening on February 26, the patriots straddled the bridge. Lillington with 150 men waited on the east side of the creek, and Caswell with 850 men were camped on the west. MacDonald's loyalists, 1,600 strong but with arms for less than half that many, camped 6 miles away. MacDonald had lost the race to the bridge and now had to decide whether to avoid fighting once more or to cut through their opponents. At a council of war the younger leader carried the debate, and eventually all agreed that the enemy should be attacked. An element in the decision was the report by a scout that Caswell's position lay on their side of the river and was thus vulnerable.

At 1 a.m. on the 27th the loyalists set out on their march to the attack, with a party of 75 picked broad swordsmen under Capt. John Campbell in the lead. By now MacDonald had fallen ill, and Donald McLeod was in command. The going was slow, for the route lay through thickets and swampy ground. During the night Caswell abandoned the camp and withdrew across the creek. Once on the other side, Caswell's men removed the planks and greased the girders. Posting artillery to cover the bridge, they waited in darkness for the advancing Scots.

An hour before dawn the loyalists came upon Caswell's deserted camp and found the fires burning low. Moving on to nearly woods, McLeod regrouped his men and passed the rallying cry - "King George and Broad Swords" - along the line. There they waited for daybreak. Suddenly gunfire sounded near the bridge. Though it was not yet light, McLeod couldn't wait any longer. Three cheers rang out - the signal for the attack - and the loyalists rushed the partly demolished bridge with broadswords out and bagpipes skirling. Picking their way over the bridge and onto the opposite bank, they got within 30 paces of the patriot earthworks before they were met by a withering fire of musketry and artillery. Nearly all the advance party were cut down, and the whole force soon retreated. It was all over in a few minutes. Pursuit turned the repulse into a rout. The loyalists lost some 30 killed and 40 wounded. Only one patriot died.

Within weeks the patriots had captured "all suspected person" and disarmed "all Highlanders and ex-Regulators that were ... in the late battle." The spoils included 1,500 rifles, 350 "guns and shot-bags," 150 swords and dirks, and £15,000 sterling. Some 850 "common Soldiers" and most of the loyalists were captured. The leaders were imprisoned or banished from the colony. The soldiers were paroled to their homes.

Though the battle was a small one, the implications were large. The victory demonstrated the surprising patriot strength in the countryside, discouraged the growth of loyalist sentiment in the Carolinas, and spurred revolutionary feeling throughout the colonies. The British seaborne force , which finally arrived in May, moved on to Sullivan's Island off Charleston, S.C. In late June patriot militia repulsed Sir Peter Parker's land and naval attack, ending the British hopes of squashing rebellion in the South for two years. "Had the South been conquered in the first half of 1776," the historian Edward Channing concluded, "it is entirely conceivable that rebellion would never have turned into revolution ... At Moore's Creek and Sullivan's Island the Carolinas turned aside the one combination of circumstances that might have made British conquest possible."
 

The British Royal government in North Carolina came to an end on the dark, twisting, swampy waters of Moore's Creek.  During this battle Capt. Semore York was taken prisoner and removed to Halifax, North Carolina, for several months. On April 1776 a list of prisoners in the Halifax Jail include Semore York's name. On October 12, 1776, his wife, Sylvania Aldridge York, petitioned the Council of Safety, sitting at Halifax, North Carolina, seeking his release in order to provide for his family. Semore committed the worst possible act when he lead the king's troops against the patriots at Moore's Creek in 1776, yet he was eventually released from prison, retained his property and received his citizenship. This indicates he was able to atone for his loyalty to the crown during the early months of the war. It also indicates he possessed that rare ability of being able to stand firm in his convictions without losing the respect of his opponents and his children, who were patriots.

THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF SEMORE YORK

In the name of God amen, I Semore York of Randolph county in the state of North Carolina being sick and in a low state of health but of perfect mind and memory thanks be to God for it.  Calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men due to die do make constitute ordain and confirm this my last will and testamente by me made Declaring this only to be my laste will and Testament revoking and canceling all other wills and testaments by me made Declaring the Only to be my laste will and testament and in the firste place I recommend my Soul to God who gave it and my body to be buried in a decent Christian manner at the discretion of my Executors never doubting but I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God--and as touching such worldly goods as it hath pleased God to bless me with in this life I Despose thereof in the following manner after all my just debts and funeral charge be paid.
   
I bequeath to my well beloved wife her feather bed and furniture and all the reste of my household furniture Excepte such as I appoint too my children in this will.

Item -- I bequeath to my well beloved wife one negroe girl named Nan with free privalidge to live on my plantation until my youngest child comes of age.

Item -- I bequeath to my Eldeste son Jeremiah all the land and improvements now in his possession.

Item -- I bequeath to my daughter Sarah her bed and table all the rest of her household goods she received after she was married.  I also bequeath to my Daughter Sarah the sum of five shillings starting to be paid oute of my Estate.

Item -- I bequeath to my Daughter Dorcas her bed and mattress and all the reste of the household goods and other things which she received before and after she was married.  I also bequeath to my said Daughter Dorcas the sum of five shillings to be paid out of my Estate.

Item -- I bequeath to my son Shubal the land whereon he now lives with all the improvements thereon containing about one hundred and seventy acres more or less to be divided from John Wilburns land.  Likewise I bequeath to him my said son Shubal his horse and saddle and bridle and all the rest of the things he received from me before he was married Also I bequeath to him my said son Shubal the sum of five shillings starting to be paid out of my Estate.

Item -- I bequeath to my son Semore one half of the land whereon I now live that is to say that part which lies adjoining to the plantation whereon William Allred Sr. now lives.  I likewise bequeath to him my said son Semore one mare to be worth twenty five pounds and a saddle and bridle and likewise a good suit of clothes when he comes of age.

Item -- I bequeath to my sons Isaac and John the sum of two hundred pounds in hard monty rates to be raised oute of my Estate and to be paid out in hand at the Discretion of my Executors and likewise a horse and saddle and bridle and a suite of clothes for both when they come of age at the Discretion of my executors.

Item -- I bequeath to my son Jabez one half of the land whereon I now live that is to say that parte whereon the house and other improvements is likewise one horse and saddle and bridle and a suit of clothes when he comes of age at the Discretion of my executors.

Item - I bequeath to my Daughters Martha and Tabitha each a feather bed and furniture and each a bedstead and likewise a cow and calf and a saddle for Each of the aforesaid girls Martha and Tabitha when they come of age at the Discretion of my Executors.

Likewise I bequeath thate the remainder of my lands and negroes note particularly mentioned in this will shall be sold at the discretion of my Executors and the money arising there from to be equally divided between my six youngest children excepting two hundred pounds in hard money rates which is bequeathed to Isaac and John as aforesaid land.  It is my will that my Executors make a deed for one hundred and twenty acres of land to my son-in-law John Wilburn the land that my father formerly lived on and likewise a claim of land containing about eighty acres adjoining aforesaid land.

It is further my will that the stock and all the impliments belonging to the plantation be left thereon towards raising and maintaining the children and schooling them  Except any parte thereof that shall appear superfluous to the Executors and then to be sold and the money to be converted to any necessary expense that may occure and I do appoint my wife and my son Semore Executors to this my last will and testament and in case my wife should remarry or die before my son Semore comes of age it is my will that my son Jeremiah shall be executor in her place.   Duly executed according to the true Intent and Meaning thereof.

Semore York    (Seal)
Salvania York    (Seal)
Signed Sealed and Pronounced       Randolph County March Court 1783
in the presents of those names       The last will and testament of
underwritten this twenty-                  Semore York was proved in open court
eighth day of January 1782.            by the oath of Nathan Allridge one of
Enoch Davis                                     the subscribing witnesses thereto and
Nathan  X  Allridge                            ordered to be recorded.
William  X  Swaford                             William Bell CC

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1. April 1768 Deed from William Aldridge to Absalom McDaniel for 100 acres proved by Simore York.
2.  Deed of Sale from Absalom McDaniel to James Aldridge for 50 acres proved by Simore York.
(NC State Dept of Archives & History, Orange County Registration of Deeds 1752-1793)
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Semore is on the 1755 tax list for Orange County NC. (Simore York)

At the period of the insurrection of the Regulators and it's tragic aftermath John Aldred or Alred must have been in full sympathy with those who opposed official tyranny. There is preserved one Petition from a group of his neighbors, and he on behalf of Thomas Welborn, who appears to have come under investigation for his part in the struggle. Among those signing this testimonial were these: SEMORE YORK, JEREMIAH YORK, Tidence Lane, John Lance, JOHN ALREAD, Shubal Stearnes. (Colonial records of North Carolina (25-26)
~1731 - 1791 Sylvania L Aldredge 60 60 Semore and his wife, Silvana, are mentioned in a deed dated 2 Jan 1776 (Randolph Co, NC Deed Book, p48); abstracted by Barbara Newsom Grigg for the Randolph Co GGY Journal.  (Ancestry.com - Wright & Kivett Connections)

1790 Federal Census, Randolph Co, NC Silvana York as Head of Household along with 2 free white males 16 and older, 1 free white male, under 16, 1 free white female and 1 slave.




13 MAR 1702/03 - 1770 William Ezekial Aldridge William's name appears on the first tax list of Orange County, NC in 1755.

William signed the Regulator petition of Governor William Tryon (Colonial Records from NC Archives, Orange Co NC - Misc - Regulators)

"Grant to William Aldridge-Aldred from Earl Granville for 256 acres on a branch of Sandy Creek, waters of Deep River, called Mr. Pleasant...beginning at a hickory on Herman Husband's line."(Orange County, NC, Deed Book 14, page 328, November 13, 1756)

"Grant from Earl Granville to William Aldred-Alred for 296 acres, on Bush Creel of Deep River..." (Orange County NC Deed Book 14, page 330 December 11, 1762)

1 December 1759 Deed from Earl Granville to William Aldridge for 256 acres proved by William Churton.
2 August 1761 Deed of sale from William Aldridge to Nathaniel Howard for 51 acres proved by William Reed.
3 November 1763 Deed from Earl Granville to William Aldred for 296 acres proved by William Churton.
4 Deed of sale from Daniel McDaniel to William Aldridge for 100 acres proved by William Pryor.
5 April 1768 Deed from William Aldridge to Absalom McDaniel for 100 acres proved by Simore York.
(NC State Dept of Archives & History, Orange County Registration of Deeds 1752-1793)





1704 - 1793 Elizabeth Symons 89 89 1694 - 1784 Jeremiah York 90 90 Another source says Jeremiah was born in Yorkshire, England.

The following excerpts were found on the internet, titled "Ratliff - Smith Genealogy" by (I believe) Lydia York.

"Jeremiah appears on the tax records of West Nottingham Township, Chester Co, PA between the years 1718-1729. 

In 1722 Jeremiah was devised personal property in the will of John Wilson of Cecil Co, MD which borders West Nottingham Township, Chester Co, PA.

It appears that Jeremiah and his family moved from Chester Co, PA to the Pipe Creek area of Prince George Co, MD (later Frederick County, MD) in about 1729-1730.  It is believed that he moved on to Jefferson Co, West Virginia ( "old" Frederick County, VA) before 1733.

Jeremiah was certainly living in "old" Frederick County, on part of a 1200 acre tract of land called "Terrapin Neck", by 25 October 1736.  The "Terrapin Neck tract had been purchased by John Browning from Jost Hite who had James Wood make a survey on 10 November 1735.  Hite, one of the Palatine Germans, had moved into this area of "old" Frederick county, VA sometime between 21 October 1731 and 28 November 1732 and acquired large tracts on condition that he induces settlers to come and take up land there.  It is not unlikely that Yorke was one such settler.  Most probably, Jeremiah Yorke moved into this area in late 1732 or early 1733.  After the death of Browning, this 1200 acre tract was cut into three parts and conveyed to the following men - Jeremiah Yorke Sr, Vachel Medcalfe and Van Swearingen. 

Later Jeremiah received a Fairfax grant for 323 acres of the NE most part of the Browning tract.  This was on 7 June 1751.  Called "Jeremiah Yorke Sr", he sold this 323 acres to William Chapline on 4 July 1753.  The chain carriers on the survey were Thomas Yorke and Davis Yorke who were almost certainly Jeremiah's sons.  The name John Yorke also appears in the records of "old" Frederick County, VA when he and Thomas Yorke were chain carriers in a survey of a tract on Opeckon Creek made in 1763.  His son, Jeremiah York Jr was living on an adjacent tract on 13 July 1773 when Joseph Mitchell received a Fairfax grant "on Great Cacepehon" which is a river in what is now Hampshire County, West Virginia.  It is possible that Jeremiah Sr moved to NC about the time he sold his land to William Chapline.  It is possible Jeremiah Sr was in his 60's, possibly older, when he sold his land."

The York's Settle in Randolph County, North Carolina



The York pioneers were among the first settlers to the North Carolina colony.  They came to the Piedmont area with other families:  Adridges, Allreds, Julians, Lindermans, Pughs, Trogdons, Whites and others.  They walked south in the wilderness on the Wagon Road for weeks or months, following their possessions loaded on the wagon and horse.  They brought with them animals to stock their new farms.  The North Carolina Piedmont area offered safety from Indian attacks, a mild climate, and cheap farm land or land grants to those arriving and seeking a better living for their families.  those who came as farmers, blacksmiths, carpenters, and tradesmen were self-reliant, independent, and hardworking.

Their route will be traced south on the Great Wagon Road as they migrated from Pennsylvania, some stopping in Virginia for a while, then forced to flee the Indian massacres and wars to North Carolina.  The numerous families of Englishmen, Irishmen, Scotsmen andGermans intermarried.  The language barrier was overcome, but they were divided mainly into two groups that had clashing beliefs which led to the Revolutionary war:  The Patriots, many of whom were Scotch Irish and favored independence from Great Britain and the Crown; the Loyalists, many of whom were Scotch Highlanders and were loyal to England.

Jeremiah York's sons had settled as early as 1750 on land at Sandy Creek, North Carolina in an area of Orange County that was later split into Randolph County.  Jeremiah arrived later, perhaps as early as 1753.  Many families of Yorks' descended from this man.  Some sons and grandchildren of Jeremiah lived and died in North Carolina while others crossed the Blue Ridge Mountains into Tennessee and Kentucky and others migrated to Illinois and Indiana.  Jeremiah, the progenitor of the York line in Randolph County, North Carolina died there after having lived in Pennsylvania, Maryland and west Virginia.  Newly uncovered information that he was in West Virginia was found in the well documented book, PIONEERS O OLD FREDERICK County, VIRGINIA (1995).  That confirmed the theory that Jeremiah, after living in Pennsylvania and Maryland, was in Great Cacapon, Virginia (now West Virginia) before moving to North Carolina where he lived and died on his son Semore's plantation."


BET 1700 AND 1710 - 1770 Sarah Seymour SEYMOUR is English.   It's a Norman habitation name from Saint Maur des Fossees in Seine, N. France, so called from the dedication of the church there to St. Maur.
~1657 - 5 MAR 1694/95 Jeremiah York BET 1635 AND 1639 - UNKNOWN Richard York 1629 - UNKNOWN Rebecca Mumford BET 1617 AND 1620 - UNKNOWN Richard York The surname YORK was recorded in Wiltshire where they were seated from ancient times.  British Eburac (yew tree), Latinized, mistranslated by Anglo-Saxons as Eoforwic (wild boar), then Scandinavized by vikings to "Vorvik", finally becoming "York".
1619 - UNKNOWN Susan Starling 1653 - 1708 Nicholas Aldridge 54 54 Nicholas had a land grant from Lord Calvert in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, dated 20 August 1680 "...300 acres surveyed for Nicholas Aldridge...on south side of Maggoty River...called Aldridge's Beginning..." (Maryland Historical Magazine, volume 26, page 273)

"Payment to Nicholas Aldridge for 50lbs of tobacco..." (Maryland Archives volume 7, page 97)
BET 1655 AND 1659 - 1719 Martha Beeson Besson is a Provencal nickname for one of a pair of twins. 1629 - 2 MAR 1668/69 Nicholas Aldridge "Nicholas and Margaret Aldridge lost 3 children at an early age.  Ann died before the age of 1 in 1660.  Jane at age 6 in 1661 and Joan at a young age in 1663.  He also lost his father in 1661 one day before his daughter Jane died.  I call this Nicholas, Nicholas Aldridge the younger because that is the way his name appears in the East Wellow, Hampshire, England church records."  - Hubicki (phubicki@@worldnet.att.net) on Ancestry.com
1632 - UNKNOWN Margaret ? 1598 - 1661 Nicholaus Aldridge 63 63 1598 - BET 8 JUN 1658 AND 1659 Cicily ? ~1617 - 1679 Thomas Beeson 62 62 Immigrated to America in 1649 with his wife, Ann, his children Thomas and Ann and his servant, Edward Cox.

Thomas Besson and his family lived at Jamestown, VA prior to moving to Maryland in 1649.

Thomas Besson received a commission for his service in the Indian Wars in Virginia.  He was a member of "Ye Trained Band", a militia group from Jamestown, Virginia.

Arrived from London in Virginia about 1635 on the "Assurance".


Maryland Calendar of Wills
Besson, Thomas, Sr., South River, A. A. Co., 15 Oct 1677; 29 Apr 1679.
To son John and hrs, land adjoinging son Nicholas Gassaway's.
To son William and hrs, land at Little Necke
To son Thomas, the younger, and hrs, land on branch of Little Necke.
To dau. Martha and hers, personalty.
Wife Hester, execx. and residuary legatee together with child afsd.
Overseer: Son Thomas, the elder.
Test: Edward Burgess, Robt. Ward, Jno. Greene. 10. 42.
Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 1
Source Information:
Cotton, Jane Baldwin, Maryland Calendar of Wills, Vol 1-VIII (8).  Baltimore, MD: 1904
1618 - UNKNOWN Caplin may not be her maiden name Hester is believed to be the widow of Henry Caplin.   D. UNKNOWN Thomas Besson ~1572 - UNKNOWN Nicholas Aldridge 1576 - UNKNOWN Mary Alice Wise ~1545 - 1624 Robert Aldridge 79 79 Notes: One Robert Aldridge appears to be the first Aldridge that set his foot on the soil of the new country called America. What day or year he arrived is not known, or if he had a family. The record only says, "Muster of inhabitants across the water at Virginia, 1624/25. Those that lie in
ye Treasurors Plantation at James City ", on the dead list "at these Plantations" is the name of Robert Aldridge. 
1550 - 1597 Anne ? 47 47 ~1519 - 1577 Nicholas Aldridge 58 58 1523 - 1602 Joan ? 79 79 ~1495 - UNKNOWN John Aldriche ~1470 - UNKNOWN William Aldryche ~1470 - UNKNOWN Ellena de Baldyt ~1445 - UNKNOWN Sir Sir Knight FEB 1677/78 - 20 JAN 1723/24 William Aldridge WILLIAM ALLRIDGE or ARLEDGE, son of Clement Aldridge and Elizabeth Tills, was born in February, about the year 1678, in Northumberland Co., Va.. The day and year of his birth record are obliterated from the old St. Stephen's Parish Register, now preserved In the Virginia State Library, Richmond, Va.. The birth of one son is recorded in this same register to William: "...n sone to Wm Aldredge was born May 16, 170...." (P.3)-

This was evidently the son John who was under 21 in 1724, as mentioned in his father's will/
William's name appears frequently in the court records, his surname being spelled ALDRIDGE and ALDREDGE, BUT MOST FREQUENTLY ARLEDGE.

"19 May 1703. Wm. Arledge & ALICE his wife having this day in court acknowledged a Deed for Sixty acres of land more or less to Mrs. Hannah Nealy ye sd deed is Recorded." (Northumberland Co. Order Book, 5:246).

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE or ARLEDGE married 2nd , SARAH .
"The Inventory of the Estate of WM. ALDRIDGE Decd. Was presented in Northumberland County Court, 20 Jan. 1724, by SARAH ALDRIDGE widdow and relict of Wm. Aldridge." On 17 Feb.. 1724-5 "This Inventory of the Estate of WM. ARLEDGE Execx of the ad Decd and is admitted to Record." (Northumberland Co. Record Book, 19:375)
William Arledge's Will:

"In the name of God Amen I WILLIAM ARLEDGE of the County of Northumberland being sick and weake in body but in perfect Sence & memory do make this my last will and Testament in manner and form following and first of all I Bequeath my Soul to allmighty God who Gave it me and my body to the Earth to be Buried at the Discretion of my Executrix hereafter mentioned. As Touching what worldly Goods it hath pleased God to Lend me I do Give and bestow as followeth:


William Allred married 2nd, Sarah.  "The Inventory of the Estate of Wm Allred, Deed. was presented in Northumberland County Court, 20 Jan 1724, by Sarah Allred, widow and relict of Wm Allred."  (Northumberland County Record Book 19:375)
"I give and bequeath unto my sons Wm and John Allred my tract of land lying in Wicompico Parish to be equally divided between the,  My sons Wm, Jno and Clement Allred each of them to have there equal part in her the Test of moveable Estate I leave theuse of it to my wife Sarah during her widowhood but if she married my will is that it shall be equally divided between her and my Daughter Jane my sons Wm, Jno, Clement and Isaac Allred.  Everyone of them to have equal part my will is that Wm Fallin Shall have the Tuition of my son Wm until he comes to the age of twenty that Charles Fallin shall have the Tuition of my son Jno until he comes to the age of twenty years.  I do like wise appoint my wife Sarah to be Exectx of this my last will and testament in witness where of I hereunto put my hand and seal this Twenty fifth day of August Anno Domini 1724.  Signed, Sealed and published in the presence of W. Allred (Seale) his Thomas X Norman mark Charled Fallin (Northumberland County Wills, Ibid, p 389)


(from allredroster.com)
BET 1678 AND 1679 - 1727 Alice or Agnes Fallin BET 1645 AND 1646 - 1701 Charles Fallin His father may have been Andrew Fallin from Ireland.

Ancestry.com/Message boards/not verified
BET 1649 AND 1650 - UNKNOWN Jean Fairfax Fairfax is an English nickname for someone with beautiful long hair.
1636 - 16 JAN 1697/98 Clement Jr. Aldridge CLEMENT ALDRIDGE or ALDRICH, son of Clement Aldrich or Aldridge and Susan Boswell :, was christened at Worstead, Norfolk, England, 8/25/1636. Entries In the parish register relating to him are as follows:

1. Norfolk Record Society Publications, Vol. XVIII, p. 76.
2. Boyd's Marriage Index for Norfolk, 1538 -1600, Vol. 1:139; Vol. 2:138.
BAPTISMS:
1636 25 Sept. Clement s, Clement and Susan Aldrich.
1669 22 Aug. Elizabeth d. Clement and Elizabeth Aldridge.
1670 9 Oct. Mary d. Clement and Elizabeth Aldridge.

In the year 1668, the name of Clement Aldridge first appears on the records of Northumberland Co., Va.
" 7 Apr. 1668 Whereas it appears to this Co(t) y(t)
Mr. Rich: Haskins CLEMENT ALDRIDGE stands indebted to Rich: Haskins In ye sums of six hundred eighty one pounds of Tobacco and Cask it is ordered that ye ad CLEMT ALDRIDGE forthwith pay ye ad sume unto ye ad Mr. Haskins." (Northumberland Co. Order Book, 3:35.)

Clement Aldridge and his wife Elizabeth became settlers in what was then known as Bowtracy and Fairfield parishes, embracing the section of Northumberland Co. North of the Great Wicocomico River (later shortened to Wicomico). In 1698, these two parishes were united to form the parish of St. Stephen's parish has been preserved and is now at the State Library at Richmond, Va.. It is in a mutilated condition, the edges of some of the first pages In the volume being worn and wasted away at the edges. Yet the facts contained therein are priceless, imperfect though they be.
On page 3 are recorded these entries of the children of Clement Aldredge:
"....ent Aldridge Son to Clement was Borne Sep.................
..........d Aldredge Daughter to do as borne Mar....................
.........ce Aldridge Daughter to Do was borne Oct...................
..........m Aldredge Son to Do was Borne Feb...................
........aac Aldredge Son to Do was borne S.....................
.........ohn Aldredge Son to Do was borne Feb...............

Since Clement Aldridge, Jr., was a witness in Court in 1691, it is presumable that these children were born between the years 1672 and 1682. William Aldridge was an adult in 1700. The other sons were evidently Isaac and John; one of the daughters was either Alice or Grace; the other may possibly have been Winifred. The next entry in the register in point of date and alphabetical sequence is in the year 1696 on page 4. Intervening year dates are missing. (Northumberland Co. Births and Deaths, 1650-1810, p.3)

On 2 Apr. 1677, CLEMT ARLIDGE witnessed a will. ON 17 Apr. 1678, CLEMENT ALDRIDGE was party to a suit for debt. He was a carpenter or joiner by trade and had an apprentice bound to him 21 Aug. 1678. CLEMENT ALDRIGE was a tithable of Bowtracy parish 7 June 1679. On 19 Nov. 1679, CLEMENT ALDRIDGE was paid for mending Bowtracy Church. He appears in various court entries in 1684 and 1688. On 22 June 1693, "William Beane was arrested at the suit of CLEMENT ALDRIDGE & ELIZABETH his wife." The final entry regarding him is recorded thus:
"Aldridge's "Upon the mocon of ELIZABETH ALDRIDGE execrx a Probate is granted
Will proved Her of the Last Will and Testament of CLEMENT ALDRIDGE deced.
19 Jan. 1698- the said Will being proved by the oaths of David Straughan & MARY TULLES
1699." Witnesses to the said Will and the same is admitted to Record. (Northumberland
Co. Order Book 5:3)"

Unfortunately this will is missing, being destroyed in a fire at the Courthouse a short time later.
It would have been, undoubtedly, of great aid.


(from allredroster.com)
1646 - 1699 Elizabeth Tills 53 53 Last name may be Till, Tilles or Tulles. 1601 - 1668 Clement Aldridge 67 67 1605 - >1641 Susan Boswell 36 36 Boswell is an English and Scots (Norman) habitation name from Beuzevill in Seine Maritime. 1558 - 11 JAN 1609/10 John Aldred 1 MAR 1561/62 - 11 JAN 1609/10 Agnes Anne Rosse or Roffe "John Aldrich and his wife, Agnes, were involved in a domestic dilemna which surely caused acute embarrassment to his clerical family.  It seems that he was absent from home for some time, and, thinking him dead, his wife remarried one Edmund or Edward Boutman on Feb 2, 1596.  John's reappearance and the resulting dilemna were addressed by Bishop Redman during his visit to the diocese of Norwich in 1597; he noted, "Ann Aldrige.  For having two husbands living."  The problem was resolved, and she returned to her husband, John Aldrich."  From Blackman-Farmer Roots at Ancestry.com
1545 - 1636 Nicholas Rolfe 91 91 1549 - 1643 Cecillia Carr 94 94 The name Carr originated probably in Northern England, Scotland and Ireland.
1528 - 1593 Henry Aldrich 65 65 Blomefield, in his monumental History of Norfolk, Vol. 5, pp. 1455-14565, says the town of Worstead is situated in a flat country. Worstead stuffs have said to have taken their name from this town, from being first manufactured there. The church is dedicated to St. Mary. He speaks of the priory of Bromholm, and of its dissolution on May 26, 6th year of Edward VI (1553), adding:

"On the dissolution of the priory, the manor belonging to it, with the rectory, and the patronage of the vicarage, were granted to the dean and chapter of Norwich; and the vicarage is valued at 10 lb. Per anom. --Mr. HENRY ALDRED vicar." (P.1456)  from Allredroster.com
BET 1534 AND 1540 - 1610 Margaret Elizabeth Browne BET 1509 AND 1518 - 1583 John Aldred John was the Sheriff in 1551, Burgess in Parliament in 1555, 1558 and 1572.  He was the Mayor of Norwich in 1558 and 1570. MAR 1505/06 - UNKNOWN Elizabeth Sotherton 1489 - >1528 Thomas Aldrich 39 39 THOMAS ALDRICH

Cozene, Hardy and Kent's "The Mayors of Norwich, 1403-1835" say that Thomas Aldrich was a draper (i.e., a cloth merchant) and was Sheriff of Norwich in 1497 and Mayor in 1507 and 1516. [This would place his birth date at 1473 rather than the 1489 as indicated below.] See below for an account of the city politics in which Thomas Aldrich was involved.

Other Norwich, Norfolk records collected by Connie Service say he was born c. 1489 and was Mayor of Norwich in 1516, and married Elizabeth Wood [Cozene, Hardy and Kent say he married Elizabeth Clark, the daughter of sheriff Gregory Clark]. LDS Ancestral File supplied earlier birth date, marriage date, wife's birth date, and husband's death date. The LDS IGI says he was born around 1472 in Greater Yarmouth, Norfolk.

Quotes from Cozene, Hardy and Kent: The Mayors of Norwich, 1403-1835:

"Thomas Aldrich, a draper, was sheriff in 1497 and mayor in 1507 and 1516. During both years of his mayoralty he went to London on city business. His merchant's mark (dated 1510) is recorded by Ewing. His father and grandfather, each named William, had been bailiffs of Yarmouth. There is some confusion in the pedigree in the Herald's Visitations, but it seems that he married once only, namely Elizabeth daughter of Gregory Clark (sheriff 1477).

Among his issue were Thomas, mayor in 1558 and Margaret "whiche died in hir floryiching youthe" in 1535 and was buried in Yelverton. His eldest son was Gregory and his daughter Anne married Ralf Wilkins, mayor in 1527. He resided in the parish of St. Michael-at-Plea, and owned property in Ber Street and in Swardeston (Mangreen Hall), Dunston and Hemlyngton. He died between January 1528-9 and the following July and was buried in the Lady Chapel in St. Michael-at-Plea. His will was proved in the P.C.C."

"Thomas Codde was one of the most worthy men that ever served the office of mayor. He was sheriff in 1540 and mayor in 1549. He was again chosen on Michaelmas Day 1555 on the death of Felix Puttock, the then mayor. He took his charge on the Sunday before Midsummer Day 1549. He, with Thomas Aldrich, signed the petition of grievances, organized by Kett, and he was therefore in favour with the rebels, when they encamped round about the city. But the city was his first care and he denied them passage and urged them to moderation.

Kett, however, imprisoned Codde and Aldrich in Mount Surrey on Saint Leonard's hill, but afterwards released Codde. The citizens feared that the rebels would destroy him, for they cried: "Let us come together tomorrow, for we shall see a cod's head sold in the camp for a penny." However, he spent most of his time in the camp, and appointed Augustine Steward his deputy. It is said that when Kett demanded the keys of the city, Codde answered: "I will give the blood and and life out of my body before I will by villany treacherously forsake the city, or through fear or cowardice wickedly cast off my allegiance to my king." This great rebellion having at length been ended, he retired to live in his house in King Street, which stood opposite the church of the Greyfriars and was, about 1860, occupied by Thomas Lound. In 1936 it was the residence of Walter Riley, Lord Mayor."
Source: Ancestry.com, Linda Harmon, Lancaster Sowell & Related Families.
~1477 - >1530 Elizabeth Clark 53 53 Clark is an English occupational name for a scribe or secretary, or for a member of a minor religious order.   ~1460 - >1528 William Jr. Aldrich 68 68 1450 - ~1510 Alice ? 60 60 ~1421 - >1468 William Aldrich 47 47 WILLIAM ALDRICH

William , Bailiff of Yarmouth ALDRICH was born about 1421 in Yarmouth, Norfolk, England. He died after 1468 in Yarmouth, Norfolk, England. He was Bailiff of Yarmouth, Norfolk County, England, in 1468.
Dates from LDS Ancestral File.
Info from Allen D. Aldridge of Durham, NC:

Notes from Norwich, England, Summer 1980, Connie Aldridge Service:

The Norwich Library has a historical section in which documents referring to the Aldridges can be found. Some ancient wills are on file there, and the "Mayors of Norwich" by Cozens, Hardy and Kent, which contains information I have excerpted. The coat of arms is authenticated in The Visitations of Norfolk. A trip to St. Clements Church, close to the Tourist Office, is very worthwhile. The Aldridge's apparently attended church and were buried there. The Aldrich home, now the Labor Exchange, is next door to the church. Over the doorway are the dates of John's terms as Mayor of Norwich in the 1500's. On the other side of the church is a tavern, which was formerly the home of another mayor, Alexander Thurston, who married John Aldrich's daughter. The mantelpiece in the tavern is the original one from the home and bears on one side the merchant's seal of the owner, on the other the Aldrich (later Aldridge) coat of arms, which is a "fess vert, bull passant". The coat of arms is very simple. I am told that the older the coat of arms, the simpler it is. As more and more people were declared eligible, the coatsof arms became more complicated so they would be distinctive.

The change from Aldrich to Aldridge in the 1500's is easily explained since Norwich is pronounced Norridge. Aldrich obviously went the same way. The spelling change appeared in 1553.

Quotes from Cozene, Hardy and Kent: The Mayors of Norwich, 1403-1835:

Thomas Aldrich, a draper, was sheriff in 1497 and mayor in 1507 and 1516. During both years of his mayoralty he went to London on city business. His merchant's mark (dated 1510) is recorded by Ewing. His father and grandfather, each named William, had been bailiffs of Yarmouth. [Notes continued in individual records of subsequent generations]

Source: Frederick Ford, Ancestry.com
August 2001
***
Source: Sharon Roach, Ancestry.com
January 2004

***
http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=2702560&st=1
***
Notes: Origin of the Name

Notes: One writer says the name derives from a Saxon word - "Aldred" meaning old or ancient - also "Ald" and "Eld" means old. The first syllable of the name Aldridge, viz, "Ald" is a corruption of the English word "Auld." The last syllable is from a word meaning "point of land or ridge." The
Welsh pronunciation is "redge," sometimes sounding nearly like "retch." When our ancient people decided to have a surname, they were living in a primitive manner in the hills of Wales as freemen. To designate themselves, they were known as the people from the "Auld Ridge,"
this being the designation of their chain of hills, which was known far and wide as "The Auld Ridge."

Notes: History of the Name

Notes: One of the first references to this name in England is Aldred, or Ealdred, or Alred who became Abbot of Tavistock in 1027, Bishop of Worcester in 1044, and Archbishop of York in 1060. This man died at York in 1069. He undertook several diplomatic missions to the Continent, and was the first English bishop to visit Jerusalem in 1058. It has been alleged that he crowned Harold in 1066; he certainly crowned William the Conqueror, and proved a faithful servant to the Norman king. He was active and courageous, but ambitious, greedy and self-seeking.

Notes: Families bearing this name were to be found at early dates in the English counties of Suffolk, Norfolk, Oxford, Derby, Surrey, Hants, Stafford and London. Records indicate that they were, for the most part, of the landed gentry and yeomanry of Great Britain. In early American records the name of Aldrich and Aldridge are used interchangeably and, in some cases, are even confused with the name Eldridge or Eldredge.

Notes: One of the earliest known lines of the family in England was that of William Aldrich, who was Bailiff of Yarmouth, County Norfolk, as early as the year 1468 and possibly before. Another early branch of the family in England was that of Robert Aldriche or Aldrich, who resided in
Staffordshire before the beginning of the 17th century, having been born about 1575. While it is not definitely known from which of the several lines of the family in England the first emigrant of the name to America was descended, it is generally believed that most, if not all, of the Aldrichs and the Aldridges derive from a common ancestor of a remote period.

Notes: One Robert Aldridge appears to be the first Aldridge that set his foot on the soil of the new country called America. What day or year he arrived is not known, or if he had a family. The record only says, "Muster of inhabitants across the water at Virginia, 1624/25. Those that lie in
ye Treasurors Plantation at James City ", on the dead list "at these Plantations" is the name of Robert Aldridge.

Notes: Robert Aldred left England in June 1635 for Virginia. Robert Aldred was brought into the county of Nansemond, Virginia 1650 by John Perrott and may be the ancestor of the Aldred family that later appears in North Carolina.

Source: Lauri Smith, Ancestry.com
November 2004
http://awtc.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2893476&id=I562052307
1752 - 1839 Jeffery Beck 86 86 Family Data Collections - Individual Records Record, Ancestry.com
Name: Jeffrey Beck
Spouse: Mary Molly McDaniel
Parents: Jeffrey Beck, Lydia Phillips
Birth Place: Augusta Co, VA
Birth Date: 25 November 1752
Marriage Place: Guilford, NC
Marriage Date: 12 November 1771
Death Place: Pickens Co, SC
Death Date: 12 April 1838

Family Data Collections - Births Record, Ancestry.com
Jeffrey Beck born 25 November 1752 in Augusta, VA to Jeffrey Beck and Lydia Phillips.

COURT ORDER: Note: Randolph Co NC 11 September 1782.  It is ordered that Jeffery Beck have letters of Administration on the Estate of Jeffery Beck, deceased.  John McDaniel and William Aldredy signed as surety.

Samuel McDaniel deeded land to Jeffery Beck out of natural love and affection-Randolph County, NC, on November 10, 1783. Samuel McDaniel deeded land to Jeffrey Beck, 166 acres on Brush Creek for 40 pounds. Signed James McDaniel, Jacob McDaniel, and Samuel McDaniel. John McDaniel-surity for Jeffrey Beck Sr. estate-Jeffery Beck. It was adm (his wife was Mary Ann McDaniel)-Randolph County, NC. 10 Sept 1785, Randolph County, NC, grant from State of North Carolina to Jeffery Beck-400 acres on Brush Creek and Buffalo Draft-bounded by John McDaniel and Thomas Frazer.  (from Ancestry.com/Lloyd Grishow tree)

Fought in the Revolution as a Whig against the British. 

Abstract of Revolutionary War Pension Files
Jeffrey or Jeoffrey, S21067, NC line appl 11 Mar 1833
Pickens City SC aged upwards of 81, soldier was born in
Augusta City, VA no date shown, lived Randolph Cty NC
at enlistment. (from ancestry.com/Henry J. Beck tree)

Family Data Collections - Deaths Record, Ancestry.com
Jeffrey Beck died 12 April 1838 in Pickens County, SC

Buried at Stamp Creek Baptist Church, Walhalla, SC.  Moved after burial due to a dam being built. (from Ancestry.com/Analemma)
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Excepted from Sketches of Rabun County History by Andrew Jackson Ritchie:  (This book belonged to my grandmother, Fannie Irene (Bates) York who attended school at Rabun Gap Nacoochee School and boarded in the home of Andrew Jackson Ritchie and his wife)

     "Back in the stacks of books in the vault of the Clerk's office"..."in 'Book A' I found the earliest date in all the annals of our first settlers.  This is in the year 1818, which was the year before Rabun County was created by the act of the Legislature.  It is recorded in two parts as deeds, but there were three parts of it and it ws intended as a will.  It is done by the oldest of the Beck family of whom we have any record, and goes further back than anything else that we have about them.  Here the old Jeffry Beck on his plantation at the Falls of Little River in the Pickensville district of South Carolina is undertaking to bequeath by will a negro woman and her five children, six slaves in all, to his three daughters.  He gives the mother, Poll, and the youngest child to his daughter Miriam, who is the wife of Seymour York.  This shows that this man who became patriarch of all the Yorks in this county and settled on Scott's Creek west of Clayton, was then living in that part of South Carolina, for at that date Rabun County had not been created.
     The second part of the deed or will was intended to give the next oldest and the youngest negro child to the daughter Ruby Swofford, and the other two to the daughter Arah Wtson, who were married to men of these names.
     The method by which old Jeffry Beck undertook to divide his slaves is unique and interesting.  He says, 'having given all my land to my sons, I put the six negroes into three lots, as equal as I could make them, and had their names written on three tickets and put into a hat.  I then had a person unlearned and unacquainted with my desire or design, draw the tickets from the hat for my three daughters.'  What is still more interesting to us is that, after stipulating that all of the negroes were to remain in possession of his wife during her natural life, he undertook to provide that two of the negroes given to one of the daughters should be held in trust for his son, Samuel Beck, and should eventually go to him."
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19 FEB 1749/50 - 1832 Mary (Molly) McDonald 17 February 1801 Randolph County, NC Deeds.  From Amos McDaniel to his brother in law Jeffrey Beck.  Establishes relationship of Mary to her father John McDaniel.

Another source says she died 12 Dec 1832
BET 1730 AND 1732 - >1809 John McDaniel "From Marjorie Pace: First appears on Tax List in 1752-3 as the only white male in the household (used to approximate age).  By 1779, he appears on the tax list with 1200 acres, a rather large tract in the neighborhood.  The names and order of children appears in his will."

From John H. Boyd's Ancestry.com tree: "Prepared by Sarah Lewis KOYLE; John McDANIEL's age was estimated by first deed from John McDaniel Sr to John McDaniel Jr in 1772.  20 years subtracted fro John Jr and another subtracted for John Sr.  Other children's ages approximated from there.  Order of sons births given in will.  Order of daughters births given in will.  Census age categories and land deeds helped approximate dates of children.  It is impossible to know which John acquired land.  All land transactions before 1799 are listed for father.  Any land transaction after 1799 are listed for John Jr.  It is probable John Jr. also has a son named John.  During this same time period there was a John McDaniel living in Ornage Co and another one livin in Chatham.

TAX: 1752-1753 List of Tythables of Orange Co NC.  John McDaniel 1 white poll, 0 black poll.

TAX: 1755 Tax List of Orange Co, NC, John McDaniel, 1 white poll.

LAND: 1760:Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in VA by Chalkey, p 360; References page 292; Note: 2 May 1760, John McDaniel, or Orange Co NC sold land to Stephen Greerrod, 30 pounds, 180 acres on Boon's Run of Shanando, part of 400 acres surveyed for Lewis and John Neal and transferred to Burk.  Acknowledged by John, 2 may 1765.  Delivered: Stephen, 20 Jan 1761.

DEEDS: 1761; 8 Feb 1761 Signed as witness for two deeds in Orange Co NC.  Register of Orange Co NC Deeds 1752-1768 and 1793, page 20.

DEED: 11 Feb 1772; Guilford Co NC, Deed Book A (vol 1) page 76; NOTE: Deed between John McDaniel Sr to John McDaniel Jr, his son, for 5 shillings a tract of land on South Buffaloe Creek & running along side the creek containing 320 acres.  Being part of a trace to land granted to John McDaniel Sr by Earl of Granville, 21 Dec 1761 and registered in Rowan Co, Book 4, page 816, Signed by John Campbell, John Butler, John McDaniel.  Guilford co, Deed Book 2 page 372 & 385 & 424, 14 Oct 1783 South Buffaloe Creek on McDaniel's line.  This land remained in Guilford Co when Randolph was divided off.

LAND: 20 Apr 1776.  Note: John McDaniel of Guilford Co to Isaac McDaniel son of the said John McDaniel.  40 acres on Brush Creek.  Signed by Thomas Vistal, David Vistal, Jeffery Beck.  Randolph Co NC Deed Book 2, page 121.  This land was originally conveyed to John McDaniel by Archibald Smith 5 May 1763 recorded a Hillsborough.

TAX: 1779 Tax List of Randolph Co NC; Note: John McDaniel listed one name away from Jeffery Beck.  He provided a list of his property as follows:  80 acres of improved land, owned 1242 acres, 25 cattle, and 7 horses.  Most fold owned less than 500 acres.

JURY DUTY: Note; 9 September 1782 John McDaniel, Randolph Co NC, sworn to Grand Jury.

COURT ORDER: Note: Randolph Co NC 11 September 1782.  It is ordered that Jeffery Beck have letters of Administration on the Estate of Jeffery Beck, deceased.  John McDaniel and William Aldredy signed as surety.

DEED: 2 Nov 1784 Randolph Co NC, Deed Book 2 page 98.  Note; Grant from State of NC to John McDaniel for 100 acres on Brush Creek.




BET 1719 AND 1723 - 1779 Jeffery Beck Was Jeffery really the son of Sarah & Edward?  Sarah supposedly died in 1716...Or is his birthdate incorrect?

Notes for JEOFFREY BECK:
It is uncertain whether Jeffrey and Lydia Beck were Quakers. They certainly lived in Quaker communities and followed their migration patterns. Edward Beck's first wife Sarah Buckman certainly was a Quaker. Jeffrey's sisters married Quakers.
Born Phila. PA
Jeoffrey married Lydia Phillips in 1743 in Philadelphia in the First Presbyterian Church, which was known as the Buttonwood church, located between Second and Third Streets on South Side of High street. The young couple spent their early years in Bucks County, PA. Their first four children were born there. They moved to Augusta Co., Virginia and then in 1753 moved to Randolph County, NC. Lydia died in Randolph County in 1755. Jeffrey then married Susannah Gibbs. Susannah and Jeffrey had four children. One source shows Jeffrey and Susannah's children's birth place as Orange Co., PA. I think it is Orange Co., NC. Jeffrey died in North Carolina in 1779.

"The Quaker founders of Pennsylvania and New Jersey came from every part of England, but one English region stood out from the rest. The Friends' migration drew heavily from the North Midlands. The same pattern appeared among immigrants who settled in Bucks County before 1687. Two-thirds came from the counties of Cheshire, Lancashire, Yorkshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire and Notthinghamshire. The rest were mainly from the area of London and Bristol."

"On the banks of the Delaware River, Quakers generally distributed themselves in settlements according to their origin in Britain. Country Quakers from Cheshire, Lancashire, and Yorkshire settled mainly in Chester and Bucks counties. The rich uplands in these two counties were a reminder of the dales of northern England. London Quakers preferred the city and county of Philadelphia."

"The Quaker way changed over the years. Historians of Quakerism identify four stages the religious order went through. The first was the founding of the sect (ca. 1646-66) when Quakerism tended to be radical, evangelical and messianic. The second stage (ca. 1666-1750) was the flowering period, when the Society of Friends became increasingly institutional, rational, progressive, optimistic, enlightened, liberal and actively involved in the world without losing its godly purposes. The third stage (ca. 1750-1827) was an era when Quakers turned inward upon themselves and grew increasingly sectarian, exclusive, and perfectionist."

"Of these four stages, the most important for American history was the second (ca. 1666-1750), when the cultural institutions of the Delaware Valley were created. During this period, many Quakers kept slaves and there was no formal Quaker policy against bearing arms. It was the third period of Quakerism in which the Quakers became pacifists and opposed slavery as a matter of religious conviction."

"The rule against outmarriage was strictly enforced by Quakers in America. For nearly two centuries, half of all the disciplinary proceedings among Pennsylvania Quakers were about problems of courtship and marriage with "unbelievers". The rule against outmarriage was grounded not so much as a way of excluding other people, but in the Quaker belief that marriages should be founded in true Christian love, which they thought could only be accomplished between believers."
source--British Origins of the Quakers to the Delaware Valley by William Dollarhide in the Genealogy Bulletin Issue #32

In 1748 Jeffrey sold his half of the land (81 acres) he and his brother, Edward, Jr. and inherited. Jeffrey was listed on the deed as living in Solebury Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. In addition to being listed on this deed along with his brother, sisters and their spouses, he signed as a witness." It is probable that Jeffrey and Edward, Jr. were both trying to support families and their mother on this 162 acres of land. Since Jeffrey and Lydia were still in Solebury until at least 1748, it would seem that the first two children, George and Sarah, were born in Bucks County. It is not known where the next two children, Dianna and John, were born. This sale of property is the beginning of the migration of Jeffrey and his family to North Carolina. Edward, Jr. was listed on a poor tax list which was levied on the inhabitants of Solebury Township in 1751 but Jeffrey is not listed.(12) In 1755 Edward, Jr. sold the rest of the land but Jeffrey's name does not appear on the deed. By that time Jeffrey was located in Orange County, North Carolina, after having made a short stop in Augusta County, Virginia.

The settlement of Augusta County was encouraged by William Gooch, Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Virginia, to "remove the frontier of civilization further from Williamsburg, and to place a hardy and enterprising race of people between the capital and the savage Indians." There were Indian disturbances in the county and it must have been a dangerous place to live compared to the established area of Pennsylvania where Jeffrey and Lydia had lived. This might have been the determining factor in Jeffrey and Lydia only staying here for sixteen months. During this time their son Jeffrey Beck, Jr. was born. In June of 1753 they sold the 400 acres of land on Mill Creek. They were on the move again and they probably traveled South along the Great Valley Road for part of their journey. The Yadkin River Road crossed the Great Valley Road in Southern Virginia. They probably took the Yadkin River Road which went to Orange County, North Carolina.

The first record found for Jeffrey in Orange County, NC, was when he witnessed a land grant application for Jacob Evans on April 26, 1754. This 230 acres of land was located in the Parish of St. Matthew on the South West side of Deep River. The river was the North and East boundary for the 230 acres. Deep River is the South Fork and the Haw River is the North Fork which feeds into the Cape Fear River. They both run through the Randolph County area of Orange County before the division. Jeffrey purchased this land from Jacob Evans on August 14, 1759. This location on Deep River became important as there was a ford to cross the river here and it was used by the Tories during the Revolutionary War. Because it was located on Jeffrey's land it became know as Beck's Ford.

Land transactions of Jeoffrey:

VIRGINIA
Beck,Jefry (1) 1752 Augusta Co., VA Land
1752 He bought Land in Augusta County, Virginia on 13 Feb 1752. He bought 400 acres on MILL Creek adjoining Charles Dotson for 5 pounds current Lawful money of Virginia from Jackson ALLen. It states he was from Augusta County, Va. at that time. Deed Book 4, page 357, Augutsa County Court, Staunton, Virginia.
Beck, Jeofry (1)1753Augusta Co., VA Land
1753 Jeffery Beck and Lydia Beck sold 400 acres on Mill Creek, Augusta Co., Virginia on 21 Jun 1753 to Michael SketLishner?? for 10 pounds current Lawful money of Virginia. Deed Book 5, page 345 Augusta County Court, Staunton,
Virginia.
Jeffrey Beck Sr.

In 1753 Jeffery and Lydia Beck sold a "certain tract of land" in Augusta Co.,
Virginia on 22 Jun 1753 to Michael Skeltishner? for 105 pounds of current
Lawful money of Virginia. Deed Book 5, page 346 Augusta County Court, Staunton, Virginia.

ORANGE COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

1755 Jeffery Beck Listed on 1755 tax List of Orange County, North Carolina. 1 white male, no slaves. 1755 Tax List of Orange Co., p. 107 by Johnson.

1759 Jacob Evans sells 230 acres to Jeffry Beck. Witness William Reed on August 14, 1759. Register of Orange County, North Carolina Deeds, 1752-1768, and 1793, p. 14.

1760 He witnessed a deed in August 1760 from the Granville Proprietary Land office to Jacob Evans for 230 acres. This is apparently the same land which he purchased from Jacob Evans and had proved at November Term of Court 1760 Orange County, North Carolina. Source: Bennett. Also in Randolph County Register 17 Nov 1760, Book 1, p. 51. as per R. J. Wicker. This Land is located in Orange County in the Parish of St. Matthew on the South side of Deep River, joining the said river. The Granville District of North Carolina 1748-1763; abstracts of Land grants, Vol. 2, p. 269, patent book 14.

1762 The Grand Jury impanelted and Sworn to wit - Jeffery Beck(Beek). He was one of thirteen sworn on jury. Orange County, N.C. Court of Please & Quarter Sessions 1752-1766 by Shields, 53-2431, p. 68. Court of May 1761.

1763 "Road to be Laid out from Coxes MILL to CoLLinees Road and the following
Lay it out - Jeffry Beck(Beek)" one of eight men Listed. Orange County, N.C.
Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions 1752-1766 by Shields, 104, p. 92. Court of
Nov. 1763. Cox's MILL - used to be on Deep River east central Randolph County,
Appears on the Co[Let Map 1770. North Carolina Gazettier, p. 123.

1764 "Ordered that Jeffry Beck(Beek)(one of 19) meet and Lay out a road... from Rowen Line opposite Frazier's Road to the best and nearest road Leading to Cross Creek." Orange County, N.C. Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions 1752-1766 by SheiLds, 223, p. 106. Court of Aug. 1764. Cross Creek was a colonial trading center in central Cumbertan County on Cape Fear River begun about 1760. North Carolina Gazattier, p. 123.

GUILFORD COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA (created 1770)

1764 Jeffery Beck home placed on historical map of Guilford Co, North Carolina.
This map stated droves of Germans settled this area. They came thru Penn. first.
Beck Research book from Coleman, p. 29.

1764 He purchased 175 acres on Brush Creek waters of Rock(y) River from Moses Nelson on 4 Jan 1764. Deed Book 1 page 348 Guilford County, North Carolina.

1767 He sold 175 acres on Brush Creek water of Rock(y) River to John Johnston on 27 July 1767. Deed Book 1, page 348 Guilford County, North Carolina (Bennett)

1768 He sold 175 Acres to John Johnton witnessed by Simon Hadley on 26 July
1768. Register of Orange County, North Carolina Deeds 1752-1768, and 1793, p.
53.

1768 Jeffery Beck Signs Regulator Petition. Colonial Records of North Carolina, p. 734.
1771 Fought in the Battle of Alamance Colonial Records of NC

Jeffery Beck Listed as Orange Co., North Carolina Regulator. The Regulators by Bennett. His fellow signers were Joseph Sitton, Joseph Craven, Peter Craven, William Moffett, and David Jackson. Two of these fellow signers were witnesses to his will and the Last two were appointed guardian to young Jesse Beck.

Jeffery Beck Listed as Guilford Co., North Carolina Regulator. There were many German names. Guilford County, North Carolina, A Map Supplement by Fred Hughes, p. 34.

WILL
Jeoffrey's will written in 1774 is in the Randolph Co., NC, archives. The will stated that he had four minor children.

Will dated July 11, 1774. Original will in North Carolina State Archives. The
will was copied into WILL Book 1, page 57. There were several mistakes made when Jeffery's name was changed to Joseph. Susan Koyle has copies of both. WILL states wife is Shusannah. He lists two minor sons Abraham and Jesse and two minor daughters Susannah and Lydia. He also mentions sons George , John and Jeffery. John was left a German body coat. There were also two married daughters listed Sarah Hobson wife of Charles Hobson and Dianna Sitton wife of Joseph Sitton. These older three sons and two daughters are assumed to have been by his first wife. His land, plantation, tools, gears, stock are left to his minor sons Abraham and Jesse Beck. Half of the stock and household furniture are given to his daughters Shusanna and Lyddy Beck. He was also concerned that Abraham and Jesse be schooled with the money on hand. It is assumed these minor four children were by his second wife Shusannah.

Spouse Lydia and daughter Sarah given in Descendants of George and Elizabeth Hobson by Earl H. Davis-1957, p. 243.

1779 Tax Lists of Randolph County, North Carolina Lists a widow Beck who refused to take the oath of allegiance to the new State of North Carolina.

1779 Dec. John Beck granted granted administrator of the estate of Jeffrey Beck deceased. Randolph County, North Carolina Court of Please & Quarter Sessions.

1780 March - WILL proved in court in Randolph Co., North Carolina. Letters
of Testamentry issued to Jesse Beck. Inventory of estate returned to court by John Beck, administrator. Randolph Co. Court of Pleas & Quarter Session 1779-1782.

1782 Sep 11 - Jeffery Beck issued Letters of Administration on the Estate of
Jeffre Beck, deceased. John McDaniel was one of the men who posted surity.
Randolph Co. Court of Pleas & Quarter Session 1779-1782.

The place Jeffery lived in North Carolina was originally in Orange County which was created in 1752. In 1770 Guilford County was divided off of Orange and
Jeffery was in Guilford County until 1778 when Randolph County was divided off of Guilford. He Lived in the same place but records for him can be found in all of these counties.


PENNSYLVANIA
1743 Married Lydia Phillips in 1743. They had George, John, Jeffery, Sarah, Dianna. Information from original will from North Carolina State Archives.

Married Susannah (Gibbs?). They had Abraham, Jesse, Lydia, and
Shusannah. Information from original will from North Carolina State Archives.

1743 Jeffery Beck & Lydia Phillips marriage 12th month 3rd day 1742/3 Listed in First Presb. Church, Phil., Penn. Marriages prior to 1810, voL. 11, p.6. Susan Koyle has copy of original marriage register from church. The Julian Calendar was being used in 1742 by England and the Colonies. The first day of the year for the Julian Calendar was March 25th. December would be the 12th month in 1742/3 so they were married Feb. 31 1743. After 1752 Jan. 1 became first day of new year. Dates written between Jan. 1 & Mar. 25 are sometimes given with double years 1742/43 depending on which calendar used.

By the time England and the colonies adopted the new calendar, the discrepancy between the calendars were eleven days. To resolve the discrepancy, the government ordered that Sept. 2, 1752 be followed by Sept. 14, 1752.

A Listing in Licenses issued by the State of Penn. Lists only Jeffrey's name and is dated 1 Feb 1742/3. He could have taken out the License on Feb lst and been married on Feb. 3rd. This License is recorded in a book entitled Licenses for "Marriages, Public Houses, Indian Traders and PedLars, Vessels Preistered, and Fines". He paid one pound for the license. Pennsylvania Marriages Prior to 1790, p.26 1743, Feb. 1, Jeoffrey Beck, p. 277 1743, Feb. 3, Beck, Jeoffrey and Lydia Philips.

The first church build by the Presbyterians was build in 1704 on the south side of High Street between Second and Third Streets. It was surrounded by some fine sycamore trees and was called the "Buttonwood Church.,, This church was enlarged twice before 1974 when it was taken down and a new church was built. Early PhiLadeLphia; its people, Life and progress by Lippincott, p. 73-74.

1748 He witnessed a deed with his brother Edward in Bucks Co,. Penn. on 18 Sep 1748. He is Listed with his father and brother and sisters.


Susan KoyLe has found no connection to James Beck being his father except from undocumented information sent to her by Fred Beck.

Witt of father Edward Beck in Bucks Co., Penn. Lists Jeffry as son. Same brother and sisters as mentioned as Fred Beck has on family group sheet.

Other marriages:

1752 Susannah Gibbs-



Article: Virginia TideWater Genealogy , March 1996 , Volume 27 , Number 1


Jeffrey Beck, Sr.
Typical Colonial Settler

by
Susan Lewis Koyle and
Patricia Lewis Cramer


During the late 1600's and early 1700's Philadelphia was a port of entry for emigrants from many different countries. As the population increased in Pennsylvania, land became scarce and the cost increased. The population responded to this situation by settling new land and creating new communities. The migration flow was in a Southerly direction, which was sager than toward the Indians in the interior. Jeffrey Beck's movement was typical of the population shift during this time. Varied surnames can be found with his in the records of Pennsylvania as well as along the migration route to North Carolina. Examples of families who traveled the same migration route are Harlon, Phillips, Gibbs, Graven, Cox, Pugh, Hunter, White, Baker, Wilson, Linderman, McPherson, and McDaniel. Many of these families became prominent in public life. The migration routes of the 1700's were similar to our modern day highways and freeways. It was necessary for the people to move from one location to another and these migration routes provided the way. This study of Jeffrey Beck, Sr.'s life provides an example of the migration pattern that many followed.

Jeffrey Beck, Sr. was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania about 1723. He was the son of Edward Beck and Sarah ---------- . He was mentioned in his father's will in Bucks County on 1 December 1736. His brother and sisters were also mentioned in the will.'

27 FEB 1726/27 - 1749 Lydia Phillips Luxton.ged]

BIO:The parentage of Lydia Phillips is not certain. More research remains to be done. In other researchers records I have seen data which might be similar to this:

The Bucks County, PA, Richland Meeting of the Society of Friends was organized in 1742. Lydia's place of birth is listed as Richland. I've also seen another source which lists her birthplace as Wales. Since Lydia and Jeffrey's oldest child is named George, which would follow a typical Quaker naming pattern, the George below might indeed be her father.

Lydia Phillips married Jeoffrey Beck in Philadephia about this time, and the young couple's first four children were born in Bucks County. Records show that they were married in a Presybterian Church.

If they were Quakers, I can imagine that they attended the Richland meeting, but they might also have attended the Falls Meeting in Bucks County which was organized much earlier--1683. I need to search the Hinshaw Quaker books for Becks and Phillips families.

A Lydia Phillips was the 10th of 10 children of George and Patience Phillips. The family lived first in Bucks Co., PA, and then moved to Abington and Gwynned in Montgomery Co., PA. Lydia Phillips and her husband (Roberts lists Leonard Thomas as the husband) had 10 children according to the account of "Early Friends of Upper Bucks" by Roberts (1925). This Lydia is the same age as our Lydia. The husband and children don't match. These Phillips were Quakers.

Phillips in early Pennsylvania land records: Minute Book "D":

Ordered that Wm. Phillips have Lott in New Castle at usual Rent, he building on it and fenceing it in within six months after the Date of Survey.

Minutes Book "F":

John Phillips was a witness to a letter that Edward Claypoole wrote to attorney Patrick Robinson from the Island of Barbados. The letter was recorded a the Commissioners Meeting of 12th June 1693. Patrick Robinson, was secretary for the commission.

The Chester Co., PA, surname registry has these persons interested in the Philips or Phillips name: Marilyn Kucera, Dick Pennock(NOT RIGHT FAMILY), Earle Nelson(NOT RIGHT FAMILY), and Diana Powell.

Edward died seven years before Jeffrey was married. Jeffrey's mother was still alive, but it appears that he was a minor at the time of his father's death. He was left half of the 162 acres of land that his father owned. Several Phillips families were located in Solebury Township and it was possibly through a connection with these families that he met his future wife, Lydia Phillips. When Jeffrey applied for permission to be married, he paid one pound for a marriage license on February 1, 1743. (3) Two days later, February 3, 1743, he married Lydia Phillips in the First Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania . This entry in the register was for the 12th month, 3rd day, 1742. Since the English Colonies were still on the Julian Calendar, which had March 25th as the first day of the year, the twelfth month would have been February. When the change was made from one calendar system to the other, the starting date of the year changed. Any date occurring between Jan. Ist and March 25th during the Julian Calendar would need a year added to it. Since this marriage
date fits into this category, a year needs to be added to the date in the marriage register.' All other records pertaining to this marriage should be scrutinized in the light of this information.

Sarah Buckman, the first wife of Edward Beck, was a Quaker. We assume since Edward married her that he was also a Quaker and English in origin. After the Quakers came to the Colonies many of them left their religion. The Quakers were persecuted for their pacifist beliefs which made it a hard religion to live. Many of them joined less demanding and 'more respectable' sects such as
Presbyterian and Episcopalian .(6) This might explain why Jeffrey and Lydia were married in the Presbyterian Church. To this union were born Five children:

Jeffrey, Beck, Sr. and Lydia Phillips(7)

George Beck b. abt 1743 in Bucks Co., PA
Sarah Beck b. 15 Feb 1745 in Bucks Co., PAs
Dianna Beck b. 14 May 1749 in Bucks Co., PA9
John Beck b. abt 1750 in Augusta Co., VA?
Jeffrey., Beck, Jr. b. 25 Nov 1752 in Augusta Co., VA

The building where Jeffrey and Lydia were married was called the "Buttonwood Church" because it was situated in a grove of Sycamore trees. It was built in 1704 and won on the South side of High Street, between Second and Third Streets in Philadelphia.(10)

In 1748 Jeffrey sold his half of the land (81 acres) he and his brother, Edward, Jr. and inherited. Jeffrey was listed on the deed as living in Solebury Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. In addition to being listed on this deed along with his brother, sisters and their spouses, he signed as a witness." It is probable that Jeffrey and Edward, Jr. were both trying to support families and their mother on this 162 acres of land. Since Jeffrey and Lydia were still in Solebury until at least 1748, it would seem that the first two children, George and Sarah, were born in Bucks County. It is not known where the next two children, Dianna and John, were born. This sale of property is the beginning of the migration of Jeffrey and his family to North Carolina. Edward, Jr. was listed on a poor tax list which was levied on the inhabitants of Solebtiry Township in 1751 but Jeffrey is not listed.(12) In 1755 Edward, Jr. sold the rest of the land but Jeffrey's name does not appear on the deed. By that time Jeffrey was located in Orange County, North Carolina, after having made a short stop in Augusta County, Virginia.

The migration path Jeffrey and Lydia followed from Bucks County, Pennsylvania to Augusta County, Virginia, was common for the shifting Population of the time. There were several major migration roads which had come about from people seeking land and the treaties established with the Indians, The treaty between the Colony of Virginia and twenty-Five Indian chiefs of the Six United Nations of Indians" in 1744, gave colonists total control of the land West of the Great Warrior Path (also known as the Great Valley Road) in Virginia between the Blue Ridge and Allegheny Mountain ranges. The Great Valley Road became the most heavily traveled route in Colonial America. This was the road that most people migrating South into Virginia traveled. The assumption is that Jeffrey and Lydia probably traveled South to Philadelphia. From there they headed West on the Philadelphia Wagon Road (also known as the Lancaster Road) which led to Lancaster, York and Gettysburg. From this area they would have traveled South on the Great Valley Road which went down the Shenandoah Valley along the East side of Augusta County, Virginia.( 14)

Because the road to Virginia hid become safe for colonists to travel, a large segment of the population began to move South. There were several motivating factors for migration in that direction. Land was difficult to obtain in Pennsylvania because the proprietors of the Province bought the land from the Indians in small sections and it was soon inhabited.(15) The land in Virginia was cheap and it was possible for a middle class Englishman to obtain a large tract of land, thus becoming a new kind of English country gentleman.(16) In 1752 the Virginia Legislature passed an act to encourage settlement of the land West of the Great Warrior Path in Virginia. men Willing to bring their families and settle there were exempt from taxes for ten years.(17) There was a large population of Presbyterians who migrated to Augusta County about this time." It is unknown what brought Jeffrey to this area but on 13 February 1752 he bought 400 acres on Mill Creek in Augusta County for five pounds.(18) This land was located in the Borden Land Grant which indicates it was located in present day Rockbridge County or Augusta Coun ty. (13) The deed stated that he was from Augusta County, Virginia at the time he purchased this land. No record as yet has been found of any other land purchased by Jeffrey in that county but he must have been- living there.

The settlement of Augusta County was encouraged by William Gooch, Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Virginia, to "remove the frontier of civilization further from Williamsburg, and to place a hardy and enterprising race of people between the capital and the savage Indians."(13) There were Indian disturbances in the county and it must have been a dangerous place to live compared to the established area of Pennsylvania where Jeffrey and Lydia migrated from. This might have been the determining factor in Jeffrey and Lydia only staying here for sixteen months. During this time their son Jeffrey Beck, Jr. was born.(19) In June of 1753 they sold the 400 acres of land on Mill Creek. (20) They were on the move again and they probably traveled South along the Great Valley Road for part of their journey. The Yadkin River Road crossed the Great Valley Road in Southern Virginia. They probably took the Yadkin Rive Road which went to Orange County, North Carolina.

There is no indication as to when or where Lydia died. It could have been on the long trip from Augusta County, Virginia, to Orange County, North Carolina, or it could have been -after they arrived. The living conditions were very primitive in Orange County during these settlement years. Land was broken and crops were planted before crude log cabins were built for the families. Settlers were flocking into North Carolina and locating along the many creeks and rivers in Orange County.
Sickness was prevalent and many of the First settlers died. At some point Jeffrey married Susannah Gibbs(7) and had four more children . The approximate time period for this marriage is calculated from the date of Jeffrey's will which stated there were four minor children in 1774. Therefore, the marriage must have taken place some time around 1760.

Jeffrey2 Beck, Sr. and Susannah Gibbs7
Abraham Beck b. Orange Co., NC
Jesse Beck b. Orange Co., NC
Susannah Beck b. Orange Co., NC
Lydia Beck b. Orange Co., NC

Orange County was formed in the Province of North Carolina in 1752. At that time it was a large area. It was divided several times over the next few years. Records for Jeffrey Beck can be found in Orange (created in 1752), Guilford (created in 1770), and Randolph (created in 1778) Counties. He actually owned the same property on Deep River until his death sometime prior to December 1779. The current county division dictated the County in which information about him was recorded.

The first record found for Jeffrey in Orange County was when he witnessed a land grant application for Jacob Evans on April 26, 1754. This 230 acres of land was located in the Parish of St. Matthew on the South West side of Deep River. The river was the North and East boundary for the 230 acres.(21) Deep River is the South Fork and the Haw River is the North Fork which feeds into the Cape Fear River.(22) They both run through the Randolph County area of Orange County before the division. Jeffrey purchased this land from Jacob Evans on August 14, 1759.(23) This location on Deep River became important as there was a ford to cross the river here and it was used by the Tories during the Revolutionary War. Because it was located on Jeffrey's land it became know as Beck's Ford.

It was an accepted practice of the time for a family to move onto a piece of land and farm it before they gained the title to it. In 1755 Jeffrey was listed on a tax list is I white male, no slaves .( 24) It would seem that Jeffrey and his family farmed the land on Deep River without the help or aid of any slaves. The crops of the region were tobacco, corn, and hemp. Tobacco was used as money and taxes could be paid in pounds of tobacco.

Jeffrey was actively involved in the affairs of his county and community. He served on a Grand Jury in Orange County in May of 176 1. In November of 1763 he was one of eight men commissioned by an Orange County court to determine the course of a road and then to build it, from Cox's Mill to Collins road(25). Cox's Mill was located on Mill Creek which joined Deep River by Beck's Ford
in East central Randolph County and appears on the Collet Map of 1770.(26) Since the land he bought was on Deep River, this meant he was helping to build a road near his home.

In is not known if Jeffrey moved to a new location or just purchased additional land for a time, but on January 4, 1764 he purchased 175 acres from Moses Nelson. This land was located on the Bush Creek waters of Rock River in Orange County and was near the site of the second road Jeffrey was asked to help lay out and build. 27 In August of 1764 he was one of nineteen men commissioned by an Orange County court "to meet and lay out a road from the Rowan County line opposite Frazier's Road to the best and nearest road leading to Cross Creek,"(25) The direction of this road would have crossed Orange County from the West side to the East side. Cross Creek was an important community in colonial North Carolina. It was established in about 1760 and located in the center of Cumberland County on Cape Fear River.(26) It was a major trading center of the time and an important lifeline for Orange County residents. The road that was built became the route that connected Rowan and Orange Counties to Cross Creek.

Jeffrey's new land is shown on a map of Orange County by Fred Hughes with the date of 1764.( 28) This map locates his land on Rock Creek near a road that runs from the Rowan County line to the Cross Creek Road. This probably was the road that Jeffrey helped to build. Jeffrey sold this acres on July 27, 1767 to John Johnston. He had owned it for 31/2 years.

Another indication that Jeffrey was involved in the community was his involvement in the Regulator Movement in Orange County. The Regulator Movement was a preliminary unrest to the Revolution. The governor and sheriff purchased their titles and charged taxes and fees as high as six to eight times the legal rate.(29) The Governor of the Province 'was the law. He picked the sheriff who then carried out his wishes. The sheriff collected taxes, served warrants, and had the power to seize property for taxes or unpaid debts. The taxes were too high, unfairly collected, and used at the discretion of the Governor with no accounting to the people. The people of Orange and surrounding counties began to object. They formed the Regulator Movement aimed at regulating the taxes and the use of them by the Governor. This protest movement induced 95% of the people in Rowan and Guilford counties to refuse to pay taxes. Petitions were sent to the Governor requesting change.(29)

Jeffrey and his friends were involved in the Regulator Movement in its early stages. During February, March, and April of 1768 meetings were held at various places. These meetings brought the people together and solidified the Regulator Movement. Peter Craven was sent to request officials to meet with the Regulators.30 A committee was formed to draft a petition to the governor. William Moffitt helped draft this petition which was signed -by over 450 men. One of these meetings was held at Cox's Mill by Beck's Ford on Deep River.(31) This was located near Jerfrey's home and it is probable he was in attendance. Jeffrey was one of the men who signed a "petition of wrongs to the settlers of the county". He also signed the Regulator Advertisement No. 9 in 1768 along with other men from his coun ty.(32) His fellow'signers were Joseph Sitton (his son-in-law), Peter Craven, Thomas Craven, William Moffitt, Stephan Harlon, and David Jackson. These men were Jeffrey's friends and neighbors. Thomas Craven, Peter Craven, and Stephen Harlon were witnesses to his will'. William Moffitt and David Jackson were appointed guardians to Jeffrey's minor children in his will. David Jackson was a blacksmith, a Regulator, and eventually became a Tory Terrorist.(29)

In September of 1770, Regulators seized control of the Court in Hillsborough , North Carolina. They beat up local officials and destroyed their property.(33) Among the leaders were Ninnian and Matthew Hamilton. Warrants were issued for their arrest. Jeffrey signed two petitions requesting pardons for Ninnian Beall Hamilton and Matthew Hamilton after they participated in the riot. The petitions stated that the men signing them did not participate in the disturbance in any way. Therefore, although Jeffrey was a Regulator, he was not involved in this incident .(34) Pardons were eventually granted to all the men who took part in this riot(31).

Governor Tryon wrote in a letter to the Earl of Hillsborough that Guilford County was formed in 1770 from Orange and Rowan in order to separate the "Insurgents" during the governnient's trouble with the Regulators. Chatham County was also organized in 1771 during the Regulator uprising to try to control the inhabitants.(35) The reorganization didn't seem to hamper the activities of the Regulators. The Governor was obviously not happy and he gathered an army together and waged 'war' against the ReguIators. There was one battle fought in 1771 called the Battle of Alaniance which lasted two hours and the Regulators lost. Governor Tryon remained in the area for a month searching out the Regulators and requiring them to take an oath of allegiance to King George. It seems the people of North Carolina had begun their own war of independence and some historians consider this to be the first battle fought in the Revolutionary War.
The paper in lengthy and no more will fit in this space. There is a second article by Susan Koyle discussing whether Jeffery was a Tory. See file

Notes for LYDIA PHILLIPS:
1743 married Jeffery Beck 3 Feb 1743 in First Presb. Church, Phil., Penn. Record of Penn. Marriages prior to 1810, Vol. 11, p. 6.

1753 Jeffery Beck and Lydia Beck sold 400 acres on MILL Creek, Augusta Co.,

Virginia on 21 Jun 1753. Records of Augusta Co., Va. by Lyman Chackey, Vol. 111, p. 346.

Name and spouse Jeffry Beck and daughter Sarah Listed in Descendants of George and Elizabeth Hobson, by Earl H. Davis-1957, p. 243.

She died after the sate of the property in Augusta Co., Virginia.
-----
all of above from Ancestry - James D. Officer

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ancestry - Richard E. Marshall
Ancestry/Jim Peterson
1684 - BET 1736 AND 1740 Edward Sr. Beck Family Data Collection - Individual Records Record, Ancestry.com
Name: Edward Beck
Spouse: Sarah Buckman
Parents: John Beck,
Birth Place: Kent Co, MD
Birth Date: 19 November 1684
Marriage Date: 1708
Death Place: Bucks Co, PA
Death Date: 16 February 1736
............................................................................................................................................................................

ROBATE:
Name of Testator: Edward BECK (Sr.) Date: December 5(?), 1736
Residence: Solebury township, Bucks Co., PA

Description of Testator: Yeoman

Bequests & Devises: "all my land and meadows to be equally divided between
my two sons Edward & JeffryÉto my wife a good and honorable maintenance
during her widowhood. I likewise give to my five daughters every one five
pounds. Viz.: to my daughter Mary five pounds at twelve months after my
decease and to JaneÉfive pounds the next year and the third year five pounds
to RachelÉTo Susanna five pounds the fourth, and the fifth year after my
death the fifth and Last five pounds to be paid to my youngest Daughter
Ellen. Appointing my wife Sarah the Sole executrix of this my last will"

Miscellaneous Information: Inventory exhibited February 16, 1736/37.
Appraised by Joseph FELL and Amor PRESTON. Administration Bond on February
8, 1736 by Sarah BECK (Widow) and William SATTERTHWAITE, Yeoman both of
Solebury. Account of Sarah BECKÅs Administratrix of goods & chattels of
Edward BECK late of Solebury exhibited February 21, 1738/38. Surnames listed
in the account: BOWMAN, GILBERT, HOUGH, GILLINGHAM, HENSEY, BECK (Jr.),
BUTCHER, HARTLEY, FELL, ELLICOT, CAREY, AYRS, LOWTHER, HAMILTON, BARCROFT,
DOAN, CANBY.

Witnesses: William SATTERTHWAITE

Signature of Testator: Edward BECK Sr. initials EB (his mark)

Source for document: The will is not recorded in Bucks Co., PA Will Book.
Abstract taken from microfilm at Spraunce Library. Copy sent by Don
Armstrong to Randy Franklin.
1677 - 1716 Sarah Buckman 38 38 Buckman is a English occupational name for a goatherd; an occupational name for a scholar or scribe (Book-Man); and possibly a habitation name representing a contracted pronunciation of Buckingham.

Another source has her birthdate as 10 September 1677.
I suspect she was born on 10 September 1677 and christened on 10 November 1677.
-------------------------------------------------
http://chrisman.org/pedigree/out44.htm


~1552 - UNKNOWN Christopher Boswell Did Christopher have a wife prior to Margaret?

Ancestry.com - Jackie Leatham's tree
~1556 - UNKNOWN Margaret or Margery Lambert 11th great grandmother BET 1650 AND 1657 - 1716 William Buckman "According to Bradfield Genealogy by Donald G. Armstrong, 'The Buckmans came to America as passengers on the Welcome with William Penn in 1682'.  See files for a list of the goods the Buckman's brought with them to America.

William inherited the land rights of his bothers Edward and Thomas when they died without issue.

The Buckman's are believed to have spent their first winter in Pennsylvania in a cave south of Fallsinton.

William was appointed one of several to lay out a road from Newton to the Ferry on the second Wednesday in December 1693.

He was appointed to lay out another road from Wrightstown to Neshamineh Meeting House on 5 October 1697.

He was a juror in 1684, on the grand jury in 1688,1689,1691, and 1698 and a witness on 14 April 1698.

On 14 April 1697 records show that William sold land granted to him by the Proprietor on 13 Sept 1686 to John Shaw.  Bucks Deeds 2:142

Recorded 11 Oct 1697, William bought land from Robert Webb.  Bucks Deeds 2:143

Bucks Deeds 3:242, 3 Dec 1705.  William purchased land from John & Priscilla Rowland (land that Priscilla had bought from William Penn 19 Aug 1681).

Bucks Deeds 4:34, Dec 1708 from Henry Cooper, blacksmith (son in law of William Buckman).

Patent to William Buckman granting him a city lot in the right of his two deceased brothers.

In 1703 William Buckman is shown as owner of a county lot of 668 acres, a Town lot of 59 acres on the west side of Newtown.

His first wife, Patricia Rowland died about 1690, probably as a result of childbed.
------------------------------------------------
http://chrisman.org/pedigree/out44.htm
1657 - 1690 Sarah Rowland 33 33 The name ROWLAND is a Norman personal name and was popular throughout Europe in the Middle Ages as a result of the fame of Charlemagne's warrior of this name, who was killed at Roncesvalles in about 778 AD.

Died probably as a result of childbed.

1636 - UNKNOWN Thomas Rowland ~1623 - 1670 Edward Buckman 47 47 Became a Quaker (Friend).

http://chrisman.org/pedigree/out44.htm
Ancestry - Patryka Tachick
~1625 - ~1682 Joan Bagham 57 57 After the death of her husband Edward, she did not remarry.  She embarked on the ship Welcome to America in 1682, along with her son William and his family, her sons Edward and Thomas, and her daughter Ruth.  On that trip Smallpox broke out, killing 60 of the 100 passengers.  Since no records of them have been found in America, it is presumed that Joan and her sons Edward and Thomas were among the casualties.
http://chrisman.org/pedigree/out44.htm

There are some indications that Joan Bagham Buckman, went with her son, William Buckman, to Pennsylvania aboard the "Welcome" as a widow. However, General W. W. H. Davis, author of the History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, appears to have seen the baggage memoranda cited as the source of Joan's travel to Pennsylvania. He believes that the first name of the widow was Ruth, not Joan....ie the sister rather than the Mother. He believed that the Buckmans of the baggage memoranda, who did not in his view include our William but another of the same name, spent their first winter in a cave south of Fallsington. In the Strawn family, who descend, of course, from the Buckmans, there was a strong tradition that their ancestors, supposed usually to have been Strawns, lived out their first winter in a cave on the bank of the Delaware. It is certain that many early Pennsylvanians who did live for such a time in such places, so this may represent a genuine tradition.
Ancesty - Patryka Tachick

1696 - ~1737 Francis Cheney 41 41 1662 - ~1735 Thomas Cheyney 73 73 1636 - 1636 Robert Chaney 1614 - UNKNOWN Henry Cheyney 1683 - UNKNOWN James Hamilton ~1687 - UNKNOWN Grace 1635 - 1709 John Seymour 73 73 D. UNKNOWN Maiden name may not be Seymour Living Wordell Living Bates Living Bates Living Bates Private Edna M. Sanders Private Gertrude H. Hodgins 1944 - 2005 Lois L. LNU 60 60 Living White 1910 - 1999 Walter Benjamin Kelley 89 89 1922 - 1978 Mamie Evelyn Kelley 56 56 Married a man they called Shrock.  He had a Pecan farm in Oak Grove, Louisiana.

Moved to Carlsbad, NM.
Living Ledford ~1859 - UNKNOWN Cirony York Unable to read the name on the 1870 Census.  Cerony? 1908 - UNKNOWN John Marion Shope Private Dolly ? Private Naomi Private Judy 1955 - 1981 Michael Lee York 25 25 Fred & Mary Lou York were instrumental in setting up the adoption of Michael by Earl & Greadle York.  Michael's natural mother was supposedly a young school/college girl from the Franklin, NC area.
1843 - UNKNOWN William Osborn Seay His name may be William Ausborn (Osborn, Ausburn, Aus) Seay. 

According to the 1930 Census his mother was born in South Carolina and his father in North Carolina.

1880 US Census, living in Upper Hightower, Towns, GA next door to Charles B. Rogers.  William's wife is listed here as Mellvina C.



BET 1834 AND 1836 - 1886 Charles Davis Patterson Charles Patterson's brother, James Leeland PATTERSON married Adeline Malissa's sister, Mahalia J. MASON.  (from Ancestry.com, June Laurence, Turner, jimjune@@bellsouth.net) ~1858 - UNKNOWN Chester Mellvina Patterson Her middle name could possibly be Carri.  I found a William & Carri Seay on the 1870 Census living in GA.
D. UNKNOWN Abraham Keener D. UNKNOWN Annah Justice 1825 - 1863 Isaac Nelson Kerby 38 38 1830 - 1908 Thursea Jones 78 78 ~1186 - UNKNOWN Hendrik III Von Geldern BET 1804 AND 1807 - UNKNOWN Jeffery York 1814 - 1904 John B. York 90 90 D. UNKNOWN Sally Dunlap D. UNKNOWN Polly Welborn 1816 - UNKNOWN Malinda Scruggs D. UNKNOWN Nancy Carnes D. UNKNOWN Elizabeth Morgan ~1818 - 1858 Tamer York 40 40 D. UNKNOWN Alford D. York D. UNKNOWN William York D. UNKNOWN Nancy Phillips 1781 - >1850 John Crabtree York 69 69 ~1787 - UNKNOWN Elizabeth Kivett D. UNKNOWN John Matthew Kivett D. UNKNOWN Rosanna Aldridge BET 1780 AND 1785 - UNKNOWN Dorcas York BET 1780 AND 1793 - 1867 Barnabus York 1799 - 1878 Nancy Kivett 79 79 D. UNKNOWN John Matthew Kivett D. UNKNOWN Rosanna Aldridge BET 1779 AND 1789 - UNKNOWN Jeremiah Jr. York D. UNKNOWN Nancy Campbell ? ~1790 - UNKNOWN Thomas York 1790 - UNKNOWN Jabez York BET 1795 AND 1798 - UNKNOWN Jane York 1798 - UNKNOWN Ann York 1802 - 1880 Darius York 78 78 1798 - UNKNOWN Mary Savage D. UNKNOWN Jesse Turner D. UNKNOWN Sarah Jane Cross 1811 - UNKNOWN Hulda York 1819 - <1870 Andrew J. York 51 51 1755 - 1816 Sarah Rachel York 60 60 1754 - 1805 John Welborn 51 51 D. UNKNOWN Thomas Welborn D. UNKNOWN Esther ? D. UNKNOWN Elias Cowan 1756 - UNKNOWN Nancy Dorcas York BET 1759 AND 1760 - 1816 Shubal York D. UNKNOWN Mary Grimes BET 1762 AND 1766 - 1806 Isaac H. York 1769 - UNKNOWN Eleanor Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Lydia Allred The Rape of Lydia Allred

A Research Report

By: Linda Allred Cooper

Whenever we think of the "good ole days" we tend to forget that some of the horrors we associate with today’s world sometimes happened back then too. The story of Lydia Allred is one such case.

Lydia was born in Orange County, North Carolina in 1770. She was one of the younger children of John Allred who settled in North Carolina in the 1750’s. Lydia was raised on the family farm located near today’s Patterson Grove community just north of Franklinville, NC. In 1779 this same land became part of the newly formed Randolph County.

Most of the time Lydia’s neighbors were law abiding. Court documents from that time period show that there were occasional visits to court to complain about a missing cow or hog and a few accusations of theft of farm equipment, but, for the most part, life was peaceful. One important exception to that rule was the Lewis family.

John and Priscilla Lewis raised a large family on their land located just north of today’s Franklinville. This family, especially the boys and men, were well known as mean, tough, belligerent bullies. They made their own rules, followed no laws but their own and beat or killed anyone who made them mad. One account taken from the book "The Randolph Story" on file in the Randolph Room, Asheboro Public Library states:

The Lewises were tall, broad, muscular and very powerful men. The family were the lions of the country. Their character was eminently pugnacious. Nearly all of them drank to intoxication; aware of power, they insulted whom they listed; they sought occasions of quarrel as a Yankee does gold in California. They rode through plantations; killed their neighbor’s cattle; took fish from other men’s traps; said what they pleased; all more for contention than gain. Though the opposed had power, they were afraid to prosecute them, they knew these human hydras had no mercy; they dreaded their retaliating vengeance. Anything, man or beast, that crossed their path periled it’s life. The neither sheltered themselves under the strong arm of the law nor permitted others to do so, they neither gave nor asked mercy. Their pledge was sure as anything human could be. If they threatened death or torture, those threatened always thought it prudent to retire to the very uttermost part of the earth.

Stephen Lewis, the fifth child of John and Priscilla, was born June 4, 1757. (1) Per Lewis family documents, he fought and bullied his way into adulthood. In the 1770’s he began appearing in court, charged with a variety of theft, assaults and battery. More times, than not, the court found him not-guilty, no doubt fearing retaliation from him or his family. On the few occasions he was found guilty, he was usually fined some small amount which was never collected.

This pattern continued on into the mid 1780’s. Between March and October 1786, Stephen and his brother, John, had been in court 11 different times (2) answering a variety of charges. One of those charges was brought by Lydia’s father, John, who accused John Lewis of assault in June 1786. (3) John Lewis was found innocent and John Allred became the target of some vicious retaliation.

The Allred family found themselves confronted by the Lewis family over the next few months. Farm equipment disappeared. Farm animals were slaughtered. When the family members went to visit neighbors, they were followed and taunted. Finally, on a sunny afternoon in October, it all came "to a head".

October 30th no doubt began as a normal day on the farm. Chores were performed, meals were cooked and served by the women while the men worked in the fields. The colorful fall leaves were falling and the weather had a slight "nip in the air". When her chores were finished, Lydia decided to walk the well worn wagon path to her sister and brother-in-law’s home, Barbara and William York. Barbara was 17, only one year older than Lydia and a newly wed. The sisters were close and no doubt missing each other’s daily company. A visit would be welcome.

The court document filed November 6, 1786 tells the story in chilling detail. Lydia was walking along the path when Stephen Lewis rode up on his horse. He, no doubt, recognized her as one of John Allred’s daughters. Lewis got off of his horse and grabbed Lydia, pulling her to him roughly and forcing her onto his lap as he sat down on a log. Holding her tightly, he asked her to have "carnal knowledge" with him. She refused, telling him she would rather die and tried to fight her way free of his clutches. Angered, he forced his hand under her skirt and "placed his hand on her privates and forced his fingers into her body". She fought valiantly, but he was bigger and stronger than the frightened 16 year old girl. He pushed her to the ground and violently beat and raped her.

When finished, Lewis left Lydia lying on the path and rode off. She pulled herself together and somehow managed to get to her sister’s home. As you can imagine, the family reacted in horror and demanded justice. On November 6, Lydia’s father, brothers and brother-in-laws came to court to file charges (4) against Stephen Lewis.

Unfortunately, as in the past, the court continued to be reluctant to indict or convict anyone in the Lewis family of anything - even something as horrible as rape. Court records show that although the Allred family presented overwhelming evidence and Lydia herself was forced to testify in detail about the rape, little was done to Stephen Lewis. Finally, in December, the court agrees to indict Lewis (5 & 6) and hold a trial. However, the intimidated jurors and court officials, fearing reprisals from the Lewis family, vote to post-pone the trial until Spring 1787. They were probably hoping that, with the new court session, they would not be chosen as jurors and would escape the Lewis family wrath.

On February 1, 1787, Stephen Lewis was back in court (7) accused of threatening the life of Lydia’s father, John. He had already beat John, breaking his nose, and continued to harass the family every chance he got. John asked the court for protection. It wasn’t awarded until another week passed. In response, Stephen and his family increased their campaign of harassment and terror.

Finally, in March 1787, the court imposes a 100 pound bond on Lewis (8) to guarantee his appearance in court for trial.  But, the trial is post-poned once again as the Lewis family’s threats scare the jurors. By June, Lydia’s father had reached his limit and begins fighting back. However, he accomplishes nothing except getting himself arrested (9) for "profane swearing in public". The humiliation must have been unbearable as John is arrested for "swearing" while his daughter’s rapist still roamed free. While in court facing the original "swearing" charge, John loses his temper again and swears at the court officials. Again he is charged and fined.

The rape trial is post-poned again and again as the jurors and court officials were harassed by the Lewis family. Court documents also show that the Lewis brothers were in court many times (10) over the next 4 years as they continued to wreak havoc in Randolph County. But, as we’ve all heard, "you reap what you sow" and eventually everyone pays for the evil they do.

When Stephen raped Lydia, he was married. Lewis family records show that he beat his wife on a regular basis, treating her no better than he did his neighbors. Finally, in 1791, Stephen’s brother, Richard, helped Stephen’s wife escape and hid her outside of the county at the home of a friend. Richard was no better than Stephen, so this unusual act of kindness was rare. Stephen and Richard argued violently about the beatings, and finally Richard agreed to return Stephen’s wife if he would promise to quit beating her. Stephen refused. Eventually he found his wife and dragged her back home, beating her severally. Stephen then went to his brother’s home intending to kill him. Richard, seeing Stephen approach, grabbed his shot gun and ran upstairs. As Stephen climbed the stairs looking for Richard, Richard shot and wounded him. The family gathered around and soon Stephen was sent back home patched up, but very angry.

As Stephen laid at home recovering from the gun-shot wound, he swore to everyone in hearing distance that he would kill his brother as soon as he was healed. Richard, knowing Stephen fully intended to carry out this threat, finally decided to end the feud once and for all. He rode to Stephen’s house, crept quietly to the back of the house where he knew Stephen was recovering. As he looked through a crack in the wall, he could see Stephen sitting up in bed having his wound dressed. Richard stuck the barrel of the gun through the crack in the wall and shot his brother through the heart, killing him instantly.

Lydia, in the meantime, never recovered emotionally from the rape. She became a recluse, painfully shy, never wanting to go out in public or leave the confines of home. Her father, John, died in 1792 knowing that his daughter’s rapist had finally paid for his crimes. After John died, Lydia moved in with her sister, Barbara, and her family where she lived until her death.
from http://www.allredfamily.org/lydiareport.htm 

BET 1762 AND 1768 - 1819 Semore York WILL OF SEAMORE YORK, JR.

In the Name of God Amen.

I Semore York of the County of Grainger in the State of Tennessee being sick and like to die but of perfect Mind and Memory knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die Do make constitute and ordain this my Last Will and Testament and first of all I give and Commend my Soul into the hands of God that give it and my Body to be buryed in a desent and Christian Burial nothing doubting but I shall receive the same again in Judgment of the great day by the mighty power of God.  And as it related to the good things of this life with which it hath pleased God to bless me with in this world I give and bequeath in the following manner and form

Item 1st – It is my will that Uriah York my son,  Rachel McEver May, Daughter, Sylvania Wood my Daughter,  Enoch York My Son,  Polly Deaton,  Marthy Johnson  My Daughters, and John York My Son have in addition to what they have already received one Dollar each.

Item 2nd – it is my will that my wife Ann live on my plantation and have all the profits there of for the use of raising and schooling my children while she all remain my widow.

Item 3rd – It is my will that my wife have the benefit and increase of all my live stock and all my house hold furniture and farming utentials During her widowhood for the use of Raising and shoolling my said children as above named.

Item 4th – It is my will that my Daughter Sary and Elijah (Elizabeth?) each of them have a cow & calf and a good suit of Sunday clouths  also a feather bed and bed furniture for each of them when ever they become eighteen years of age.

Item 5th – It is my will that my sons Riley and Harrison each of them have a good sute of Sunday clothes a horse Bridle and Saddle when ever they become twenty one years of age. 

Item 6th – It is my will that should my wife Ann marry after my death, then all my personal goods and chattels be sold and equally divided between her & the four children here in after named  that is to say  Sarah  Elizabeth  Riley & Harrison  but not till my youngest child becomes of age.

Item 7th – It is my will that at the marriage or death of my said wife then my land be equally divided between  (page break.....second page...97)  my sons Riley & Harrison all but four acres which I have sold and layd off to John Wood adjoining his field near the mountain.

Item 8th – It is my will that my grandson Pleasant  the son of my Daughter  Rachel  should he stay and remain with my wife till he be twenty one years of age  that he have good shooling  a good horse  Saddle & Bridle and a good suit of Sunday Clothes out of my Said Estate.                                                

Item 9th – I appoint my beloved Wife Ann and John Wood the excoutors & Executrix of this my last Will and Testament, revoking all others  retifying and confirming this my last Will & Testament and no other in testimony where of I have here unto set my hand and seal this Seventh day of February 1819.

                                                                                                His

                                                                                  Seamore   X   York (Seal)     

                                                                                                 mark

Signed and sealed & delivered In presents of Josiah Smith (his mark)  proven Andrew Phillips (his mark)proven May Term 1819.

State of Tennessee)

Grainger County  ) August Term 1819.

I John Cooke  Clerk of the Court of Pleas and quarter Session for Said County do certify that the execution of the foregoing last Will and Testament of Seamore York was proven in part at last Term by the oath of Andrew Philips one subscribing witness thereto and ordered to be filed for further probate   and that it was proven in full at this term by the Oaths of Josiah Smith and Robert Huddleston  the two other subscribing witnesses there  to who swore that the said Seamore York at the time of executing this will was of sound mind and disposing memory.

                                                                                    John Cooke     Clerk
1764 - UNKNOWN Elizabeth Ann Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Ann Elizabeth Wood BET 1762 AND 1765 - 1806 Jesse York 1773 - 1861 Tabitha York 87 87 1760 - 1826 Solomon Trodgen 66 66 D. UNKNOWN William Trodgen D. UNKNOWN Mary Jones 1768 - 1861 Martha York 93 93 D. UNKNOWN Edmund Hayes D. UNKNOWN Josiah White 1772 - 1859 John York 87 87 1776 - 1863 Martha White 87 87 1776 - 1855 Jabez York 78 78 1776 - 1897 Elizabeth White 121 121 D. UNKNOWN John White D. UNKNOWN Ann Welborn ~1775 - UNKNOWN William Alfred York 1763 - ~1830 Jacob Routh 67 67 1) June 20, 1788, Jacob Routh purchased 120 acres of land on Sandy Creek that had originally been part of the York Grant. As follows:
a) JACOB ROUTH purchased from William and Charity Fields for £50 "hard money", 120 acres of land "on Sandy Creek, Randolph County, NC granted to Semor York from the Earl of Granville on August 1, 1758 to William Ingelson
b) Jan. 20, 1759, to Semor York 1774, also all rights of said Silvana York and Semor York to William Field" , Witnessed by John York and John Chambers. From Randolph County, NC Land Deed Abstracts, Books 1-5, 1779-1794 by Barbara Newsome Grigg. Copied at Randolph County Library, Ashboro, NC
c) On the General Index to Real Estate Conveyances, Randolph County this was listed as being in Book 3, page 315.
d) In this same year Jacob purchased an additional 108 Acres from Shubal York, witnessed by Aaron York (Uncle of Mollie)and Edmond York (Brother of Mollie) in Book 3, page 327.
(Shubal York was son of Seymore York and a first cousin of Mollie [York] Routh, and evidently lived near them according to tax records.)
e) Between the years 1800 and 1824 Jacob Routh accumulated a great deal of land from the following individuals: James Crabtree, John Routh, John Walker, William Welborn, Daniel Clark, Jonathan Bain, William York (Mollie's brother who went to TN) David Fox et al. Lawrence said the land was all in the Sandy Creek area. Here Jacob Routh and his family lived among members of the York family, relatives of his wife, for the rest of his life. Lawrence believed he died at Sandy Creek about 1830.
f) Jacob Routh appeared in the 1799 Tax list of Randolph County along with Henery Routh and Jeremiah Routh. Jacob owned 228 acres of land by this date.
g) By the 1803 Tax List Jacob Routh owned 472 acres of land and now was cited with Henery Routh, Jerimiah Routh and Isaac Routh.

1) 1790 Heads of Households North Carolina
Hillsborough District, Randolph Co., NC, Page 99, Column I
LName FName Free White Free White Free White
Males 16+ Males 16- Females
RUTH, Jacob 1 6 1
2) 1800 Federal Census, Randolph Co., NC
LName FName Free White Free White Free White Free White
Males 45+ Males 16-26 Males 10-16 Males 10-
RUTH, Jacob 1 3 3 1
Free WhiteFree White
Females 26-45Females 10-16
D. UNKNOWN Zachariah Routh D. UNKNOWN Elijah York D. UNKNOWN Jesse York ~1730 - 1758 John York 28 28 D. UNKNOWN Hannah Deaver ~1732 - UNKNOWN Sarah Horner BET 1730 AND 1735 - 1797 Jeremiah York BET 1730 AND 1734 - UNKNOWN Mary Thomas 1732 - BET 1816 AND 1817 Henry B. York Henry York Will 8 March 1817:
In The Name of God Amen Henry York of the county of Wilkes and the state of North Carolina being very weak of body but of perfect mind and memory thanks be to God calling unto mind the morality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men to die do make and ordain tis my last will and testament that is to say principally and first of all give and renounce my soul into the hands of the Almighty God that gave it and my body. Remand to the Earth to be buried in decent Christian burial at the discretion of my exseutive nothing doubting at the general resurrection. Shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God and as touching such world by estate where with it has pleased God to help me in this life. Give? and dispose of the same in the following manner of form. First I ordain my beloved wife Market to be executive of my estate the during of her ? and if she should marry again she is to have but a child's part. To my son Henry I give one hundred acres of land on the south side of the tract and to my son Leonard I five the old tract were I now live and after to death of beloved wife all my estate shall be equally divided amongst my daughters that
is to say the daughters of my last wife Market but if she is to marry than all my estate is to be sold by my executors George Wheatly and Daniel McDaniel and for my children of the
first wife as I think I have given them more than the younger children will get so I bequeath unto each one dollar and I do hereby utterly disblame revoke all and every testament and
wills in ?? whereof I have here unto got my hand and seal this 8th day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eighth hundred and seventeen. Signed sealed on his last will and testament in the presence of us:
David Thronbergh
Henry Lenderman
Dan McDaniel
Henry York
(his mark)
1774 - UNKNOWN Margaret Lenderman Her birthdate may be 3 July 1774.   D. UNKNOWN Henry Lenderman D. UNKNOWN Eve Dorothy ? 1734 - 1809 Joseph York 75 75 D. UNKNOWN Jemima Burrows D. UNKNOWN Martha Spinks 1735 - 1790 Thomas York 55 55 From Douglas Colbert's booklet:  "Thomas, believed to have been born in Pipe Creek Settlement, Carroll County, Maryland, is another possible son of Jeremiah York.  He wrote a will dated 11 October 1784, witnessed by Nathan and William Alldredge.  The will is probated in Randolph County, N.C. in September 1790.  Thomas and Ellinor identified the following children in their wills (below).

There are several documents that link the family of Thomas with the other York's in Randolph County.  Semore York and Jeremiah York (the latter probably is the son of Semore), witnessed a deed in 1771 transferring land in Guilford County (now Randolph) from John Crabtree, Sr. to his son, John Jr.  The senior John was the husband of Lyde York.  In May 1795, Jeremiah York proved a deed transferring 170 acres from William and John York, sons of Thomas and Elinor, to Adam White.  According to the deed, this land was part of a grant to Thomas on 2 November 1785 and later willed to his wife, Elinor.  In 1779, Thomas York appeared on the Randolph Tax List with property valued at 332 English pounds, including 230 acres, 10 cattle, 2 horses and 12 pounds, 10 shillings in cash.  Thomas wrote a will dated 11 Oct 1784, witnessed by Nathan and William Alldredge.  The will, identifying 7 children and 2 grandchildren was probated in Randolph County in September 1790.  Thomas and James Jr., minor sons of James Sr., are listed in their Grandpa Thomas York's will.

It appears that James Sr., as well as his wife, died before 1790 and that their two children were being raised by the grandparents.  A James York, probably the son of Thomas, appeared on the 1779 Randolph Tax List, therefore his death would have been between 1779 and 1790.  Thomas bequeathed 100 acres of land, part of the parcel where he then lived, to his two grandsons.  To each of his named children, he gave the sum of 10 shillings and the remainder of his estate was inherited by his wife, Elinor.

Elinor left a will signed on 22 November 1790, and probated in 1795.  She named Henry York and Jonathan McCollum to be executors of her will.  Like her husband, she also gave 10 shillings to each of the above surviving children and divided the remaining estate equally.   In addition, she gave 5 shillings to her granddaughter, Elizabeth, the daughter of her deceased son, James.  She did not mention her grandsons, Thomas and James, Jr., who had been given 100 acres in their grandpa's will five years earlier.

Some children of Thomas and Elinor York moved out of Randolph county.  They moved to several locations including Rutherford County of western N. C., Tennessee, Kentucky and Posey County, Indiana."

Will of Thomas York, father of Lydia York above. Note: The blanks were
unreadable words.
In the name of God, Amen. I, Thomas York, of the county of Randolph, the eleventh day of October, one thousand seven hundred and eighty four, being weak in body but of perfect mind and memory, blessed by God for it and knowing that his appointed for all men once to die do make this my last will and testament. First of all, I will to bequeath my soul to God who gave it and my body I remind to the earth to be buried in a Christian liked decent manner. Nothing doubting but I shall by the Almighty power of God receive the same again at the general resurrection as touching such worldly good where with God hath blest. He within this life gives. It is my will in the first place that all my just debts and funeral charges be paid. ______I give and bequeath unto my son John York the sum of ten shillings and his heirs. ________I give unto my son William York the sum of ten shillings and to his heirs. ______I give and bequeath unto my daughter Susannah, wife of John Pain the sum of ten shillings and to her heirs. _____I give and bequeath unto my daughter Lettesch?, wife of Joab Jackson the sum of ten shillings and her heirs. ________I give and bequeath unto my daughter Lydithe, wife of John Crabtree the sum of ten shillings and to her heirs. ________I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Elinor, wife of Jonathan McCollum the sum of ten shillings and to her heirs._______I give and bequeath to my grandchildren, the sons of James York (dec’d), Thomas and James one hundred acres of land, part of the tract or parcel of land whereon I now dwell beginning at Aadalnot my most northernmost westernmost ________ _________ on John Welborn’s most southernmost line thence running south so far as to lay the before mentioned hundred acres of land to the others and if they should both die before they come to the age of twenty one years. I order that the deed of the said hundred acres of land be made by my hereafter executors be made to my well beloved wife, Elinor, and her heir and if either of the said sons, both of the said children, should come to the age of twenty one years that my executors do make a deed of conveyance to the before mentioned Thomas and James York and to their heirs. _________and the remainder of my estate both real and personal I give and bequeath to my well beloved wife Elinor and to her heirs and that my hereafter executors do in one year after my death make a deed to the remainder of all my land unto my well beloved wife and deliver the remainder of my personal estate after paying the before mentioned ledgers and I do hereby ordain and appoint and constitute my son in laws John Pain and Jonathan McCollum to be the executors of this my last will and testament and utterly disallow, revoke, and disannul all and every other former will and testament legacies and executors at any time before this time names. Ratifying and confirming this and no other I have here unto set my hand and seal the day and year above written. Signed, sealed, published, pronounced and declared by the said Thomas York as his last will and testament in the presence of us the subscribers. Isaac McCollum, Nathan Alldredge, William Alldredge John died abt 1798 in Randolph Co., NC.

Note: The copy was very hard to read, so I'm sure there are some minor
mistakes in this transcription, but the names of the children are accurate.

1730 - 1795 Elinor Aldridge 65 65 Her name may have been Elinor Silver.


Will of Elinor Aldridge, wife of Thomas York, mother of Lydia our line,
below.

In the name of God, Amen, this twenty second day of November one
thousand seven hundred and ninety, Elinor York of Randolph County (NC) being weak of body but in perfect mind and memory thanks be given to God for it and knowing that it is appointed for all mankind that I do make this my last will and testament and first I will and bequeath my soul should go to God who gave it and my body I recommend to the Earth to be buried in a Christian like and decent manner nothing doubting but I shall by the mighty power of God receive the same again at the general resurrection. As directing such worldly goods where with God hath blessed in this life imprimis it is my will that in the first place that all my just debts and funeral charges be paid. Item 1 give and bequeath to my son John York and to his heirs the sum of ten shillings. Item 1 give and bequeath unto my son William York or to his heirs the sum of ten shillings, Item 1 give to my daughter Susannah and to her heirs the sum of ten shillings, Item 1 give and bequeath to my daughter Letishe the sum of ten shillings, Item 1 give and bequeath to my daughter Lyde the sum of ten shillings, Item 1 give to my grand daughter Elizabeth of my son James York the sum of five pounds current lawful money as here fore the remainder of the estate I order that it be equally divided amongst my children. Viz John, William, Susannah, Lishi, Lydy and Ellnor and that one year after my death and to Elizabeth York at the age of eighteen and I do herby ordain appoint constitute Jonathan Mcollum and Henry York to be the Executors of this my last will and testament and I do utterly disallow revoke and disannul any and every and former will testaments legacies Executors at any time before this time named. Ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my Last Will and Testament in witness where of I have hereunto set my hand and seal day and year above written signed sealed published pronounce and declared by the said Elinor York as the last will and testament in the presence of us the subscriber. Isacc McCullom Allen Langley Silas Allred Elinor York, her mark November 1792 
1735 - 1827 Elizabeth York 92 92 D. UNKNOWN Daniel Underwood 1779 - 1861 Thomas Allred 82 82 D. UNKNOWN Elias Allred D. UNKNOWN Poilly Rigby 1736 - UNKNOWN James York 1738 - UNKNOWN Aaron York 1740 - UNKNOWN William York <1745 - 1777 Bartholomew York 32 32 Private Ruth Marie Living Lou Private Rosa Adell Hasty Living Loretta Private Unknown Living White 1951 - 1951 Jerry George Anderson Private Alice Louise Sidle Private Fred Herman Puehler Private Ida Lucille Sidle Private Marvin Shull 1831 - 1915 Matthias Hoffman 84 84 1835 - 1919 Lucinda Beaver 83 83 BEAVER is a Norman habitation name from any of several places in France called Beauvoir. 1887 - 1918 Ernest Charles Gramling 31 31 1890 - UNKNOWN Mayme Gerst 1889 - 1964 John Matthias Gramling 75 75 1889 - 1962 Florence Onieta Jennings 73 73 Both parents born in Ohio according to 1920 Census. 1798 - 1866 Jacob Hoffman 68 68 1798 - 1884 Magdalena Stouffer 85 85 1852 - 1956 John Henry Hoffman 104 104 1858 - 1923 Jacob Beaver Hoffman 65 65 1854 - 1915 Minerva Catherine Delong 61 61 1864 - 1933 Samuel Milton Hoffman 68 68 1868 - 1934 Ada Irene Davis 66 66 1868 - 1932 Anna May Hoffman 64 64 1863 - 1932 Hezekiah Gramling 69 69 1871 - 1935 Charles Philip Hoffman 64 64 1873 - 1959 Myrtle May Holford 86 86 D. UNKNOWN Matthias Hoffman D. UNKNOWN Mary Hoover 1823 - 1877 Eve Hoffman 54 54 1825 - 1916 Nancy Hoffman 90 90 1819 - 1890 Matthias Hoffman 70 70 D. UNKNOWN Henry Hoffman D. UNKNOWN Susanna Garver 1827 - 1890 Mary E. Hoffman 63 63 D. 1859 George W. Wolf 1828 - 1903 Magdelena Hoffman 75 75 1823 - 1881 Henry Jr. Hoffman 58 58 D. UNKNOWN Henry Hoffman D. UNKNOWN Susanna Garver 1830 - 1881 Esther Hoffman 50 50 1823 - 1879 John W. Mentzer 55 55 1833 - UNKNOWN Elizabeth Hoffman D. UNKNOWN William Row 1834 - 1904 Leah Hoffman 70 70 1828 - 1913 Samuel Reecher 85 85 1837 - 1898 Jacob Hoffman 61 61 1838 - 1908 Joanna Lesher 70 70 1839 - 1880 John Hoffman 41 41 1844 - 1866 Sarah Hoffman 22 22 ~1720 - 1804 John Hoover 84 84 from John Myer's tree at Ancestry.com:
The date of birth of John Hoover, the founder of "Necessity," has not
been learned, but it is known that one of his nine or more children
was
born in 1748, and since two of his sons do not appear to have
accompanied
their parents to Maryland, the probability exists that they were born
earlier and that they had already established their own homes
elsewhere,
prior to the mid-career Maryland migration of their father. Their
birth
during the 1740's, sugests that he was born during the early 1720's or
before. Because of that uncertainty, together with the uncertain date
of
his father's immigration, it cannot be determined whether or not he
was
of American birth. If the identification is correct, John's first
Maryland migration was to the Frederick County area East of the
Monocacy,
where he apears to have tarried a few years before settling just South
of
the Mason-Dixon Line, as established in 1767, at the two springs, at
the
head of Spring Run, near the present village of Ringgold, in the
morning
shadow of South Mountain. From real estate records it is known that
his
wife bore the Christian name of Mary, and Mrs. Hoover tells us that
her
maiden surname probably was "Watson." Having noted that on August 29,
1769, he had purchased a farm from Sarah Watson, Executrix, and
William
Watson, Executor, of the Estate of David Watson, it was attempted to
strengthen her conjecture by examination of that Deed, only to
discover
that John Hoover had actually purchased "Harry's Grove," or Grave, as
sometimes appearing, from Michael Miller, who had not received his
Deed
thereto from the then deceased David Watson, and as recited in their
Deed
to John Hoover, it was being so executed at the request of Mr. Miller.
Since early Lancaster County marriage records have not been preserved,
the source of Mrs. Hoover's information has not been learned.
D. UNKNOWN Mary Watson 1790 - 1882 Christian Hoffman 91 91 1790 - 1870 Nancy Newcomer 80 80 1793 - 1820 Mary Hoffman 27 27 1793 - 1874 Daniel Shank 81 81 D. UNKNOWN John Shank D. UNKNOWN Nancy Kauffman 1794 - UNKNOWN Henry Hoffman D. UNKNOWN Susanna Garver 1796 - UNKNOWN Anna Nancy Hoffman D. UNKNOWN Peter Bare D. UNKNOWN Johannes Hoover D. UNKNOWN Anna ? Living Giles Living ? Private Unknown Living Cook Living Cook Living Phillips Living Ward Living Lunn ~1874 - UNKNOWN Dorah Seay Name may be Dora. 1871 - 1968 Lillie Arvaline Seay 97 97 ~1877 - UNKNOWN Orah O. Seay 1828 - BET 1860 AND 1919 Charles Rogers ~1828 - UNKNOWN Nancy Jones 1798 - BET 1859 AND 1891 Elihu Rogers 1800 - BET 1859 AND 1896 Mary ? 1814 - ~1856 James Madison Seay 42 42 D. UNKNOWN Unknown ~1822 - 1901 Mellie Jemima Evans 79 79 Living Schrock Private Alvin Schrock Private Frances Robinson Bates Private Clyde Tillman Bates Private Rhea Montgomery Living Wordell Living Dexter Living ? 1895 - UNKNOWN California Gregory Private Elmer Siler Tallent Private Mary Francis Tallent Private Gladys Irene Tallent 1845 - 1931 James A. Bates 86 86 James was 94 years old and living with Annie Bates Tallent and her family in 1930.   1876 - UNKNOWN John Lee Bell ~1882 - 1947 George W. Bell 65 65 1913 - 1979 Quince E. Hodgins 65 65 BET 1844 AND 1845 - UNKNOWN Mary M. Henson Possibly part Cherokee.

Mary's middle initial on the 1880 Census is "N".

The name HENSON is thought to be of English origin.

Ancestry.com - John W. Andrews tree
~1802 - 1889 William Bates 87 87 Living with son, James A. Bates in Smiths Bridge, Macon, NC in 1880.

In 1883, The Enterprise, a Franklin newspaper listed the oldest members of the community.  Among those was William Bates, 75.

Newspaper article, 29 Aug 1889:  Mr. William Bates of Smith Bridge Township, died last Sunday evening Aug. 25, 6 o'clock of Erysipelas at age 85.

Double stone in Coweeta Baptist Church Cemetary:
Blessed are they who die [in?] thee [L***?]
Christeena Bates  Died June 11, 1888 aged [82?] yrs.
William Bates  Died August 25, 1889 aged 84 yrs.
BET 1805 AND 1806 - 1888 Christeena Carpenter Living with son, James A. Bates in Smiths Bridge, Macon, NC in 1880.

Double stone in Coweeta Baptist Church Cemetary:
Blessed are they who die [in?] thee [L***?]
Christeena Bates  Died June 11, 1888 aged [82?] yrs.
William Bates  Died August 25, 1889 aged 84 yrs.
1879 - 1887 Robert L. Bates 7 7 1888 - UNKNOWN Emma E. Bates ~1822 - 1889 Ephraim D. Henson 67 67 Double stone in Coweeta Baptist Church Cemetary:
(Inscription faded) 
Annie Henson   Born Mar 22, 1813   Died Dec 30 1903
Ephraim Henson  Born Mar 23, 1812  Died Nov 12, 1889

Ancestry.com - John W. Andrews tree
1.  Rebecca Brown Perry, P O Box 5, Demarest, GA 30535  Sept 12, 2000

Dawn Watson's genealogy at Yahoo! Geocities

SOURCES:
Macon County Death Index, 1913-1978 (USGenWeb)


~1822 - 1903 Annie Carpenter 81 81 Carpenter is an English occupational name for a worker in wood.

Double stone in Coweeta Baptist Church Cemetary:
(Inscription faded) 
Annie Henson   Born Mar 22, 1813   Died Dec 30 1903
Ephraim Henson  Born Mar 23, 1812  Died Nov 12, 1889

SOURCES:
Macon County Death Index, 1913-1978 (USGenWeb)
1863 - UNKNOWN Robert Columbus Parker 1829 - UNKNOWN Jahue N. Parker 1838 - UNKNOWN Talitha Caroline Moore D. UNKNOWN Unknown BET 1730 AND 1735 - ~1810 Katherine ? Appears by herself on the 1810 Moore County, NC census.

Katherine is mentioned in John McDANIEL's will dated 17 June 1809 as his wife.
1643 - UNKNOWN Priscilla Shepherd D. UNKNOWN Unknown D. UNKNOWN Unknown BET 1750 AND 1752 - UNKNOWN John McDaniel BET 1755 AND 1756 - 1822 Isaac McDaniel ~1756 - UNKNOWN Abraham McDaniel ~1760 - UNKNOWN Mariam McDaniel 1761 - UNKNOWN Sarah McDaniel BET 1761 AND 1763 - UNKNOWN Samuel McDaniel ~1767 - UNKNOWN Amos McDaniel ~1770 - UNKNOWN Elizabeth McDaniel 1796 - UNKNOWN Samuel Beck BET 1775 AND 1782 - UNKNOWN Solomon S. Beck ~1777 - UNKNOWN Gideon Beck BET 1781 AND 1786 - UNKNOWN Arah Beck ~1782 - UNKNOWN Frederick Beck 1774 - UNKNOWN Rebecca Beck 1778 - UNKNOWN Isaiah Beck Is this Isaac?  Born 2 Sep 1778 1680 - <1740 Mary Buckman 59 59 1688 - ~1750 Ruth Buckman 62 62 1690 - <1755 William Jr Buckman 64 64 D. 13 MAR 1732/33 Elizabeth Wilson 1711 - 1790 David Buckman 78 78 D. UNKNOWN Mary Knight D. UNKNOWN Daniel Knight D. UNKNOWN Elizabeth Walker 1656 - UNKNOWN Mary Buckman 4 FEB 1659/60 - ~1716 Ruth Buckman 1669 - 1670 Sarah Buckman 10m 10m ~1654 - 1682 Thomas Buckman 28 28 ~1651 - 1682 Edward Jr Buckman 31 31 1709 - 1793 Elizabeth Buckman 84 84 D. UNKNOWN Zebulon Jr Heston D. UNKNOWN Zebulon Sr. Heston D. UNKNOWN Elizabeth Heston D. UNKNOWN Jemima Heston D. UNKNOWN Rebecca Heston D. UNKNOWN Rachel Heston D. UNKNOWN Zebulon III Heston D. UNKNOWN Mary Heston D. UNKNOWN William Heston D. UNKNOWN John Heston D. UNKNOWN Iasiah Heston D. UNKNOWN David Heston D. UNKNOWN Henry Sr. Cooper D. UNKNOWN William Cooper D. UNKNOWN Thomasin ? D. UNKNOWN Ruth Cooper D. UNKNOWN Sarah Cooper D. UNKNOWN William Cooper D. UNKNOWN Henry Jr Cooper D. UNKNOWN John Cooper D. UNKNOWN Lancelot Strawhen Last name may be Strawhen, Strawn or Straughan.
D. UNKNOWN Jacob Strawhen D. ~1742 Richard Sr. Harrison D. UNKNOWN William Harrison D. UNKNOWN Peter Harrison D. UNKNOWN George Harrison D. UNKNOWN Richard Jr. Harrison D. UNKNOWN Ruth Harrison D. UNKNOWN Sarah Harrison 24 JAN 1712/13 - 1717 Rebecca Buckman D. UNKNOWN Peter Blaker D. UNKNOWN Johannes Bleicker D. UNKNOWN Rebecca ? D. UNKNOWN John Blaker BET 1707 AND 1708 - UNKNOWN Sarah Beck BET 1706 AND 1709 - UNKNOWN Frances Beck ~1711 - UNKNOWN Edward Jr. Beck 1676 - 1682 Thomas Buckman 6 6 1707 - 1734 Thomas Sr. Buckman 27 27 D. UNKNOWN Agnes Anne Penquite D. UNKNOWN Rebecca Buckman D. UNKNOWN Agnes Buckman D. UNKNOWN Elizabeth Buckman D. UNKNOWN Esther Penquite D. UNKNOWN John Penquite D. UNKNOWN Agnes Sharp D. UNKNOWN Sarah Buckman D. UNKNOWN William III Buckman D. UNKNOWN John Sr. Buckman D. UNKNOWN Joseph Sr. Buckman D. UNKNOWN Thomas Sr. Buckman D. UNKNOWN Isaac Buckman D. UNKNOWN Jacob Buckman ~1790 - 1836 William Carpenter 46 46 Found on Ancestry.com (John W. Andrews Family Tree):
Macon County, North Carolina Wills,
p14,
Will of William Carpenter, January 7, 1836

In the name of God, Amen. William Carpenter of the county of Macon and
state of North Carolina being in right mind and memory before God do make
and ordain this my last will and Testament.
Item 1st I will that after my death all my funeral expenses be paid
and all my lasts debts.
My wife PEGGY shall be my beds, bed-steds and bed furniture with the kitchen
furniture, one cupboard that is in the bid Room with a sufficient poetion of
cupboard furniture, two Black Walnut tables, six Sitting Chairs, four cows
with the calves (if they have them)...to take her choice of the stock, four
Horse Beasts, Charley and the filly I got of HENSON, also, old Fox is to be
kept on the place and well taken care of ao long as he lives for the good he
has done me...thirteen head of Hogg, ten of them for meat and three open
laws. She is to take her choice. Also, a year's support of meat, corn and
wheat, other articles, etc...two plows and two pair of gerring, four hoes,
two swingletrees, two axes, one mattock anmd iron-wedges, her side saddle,
two bridles, with all the fowls on the place.
Also, I give her my part of the plantation whereon I now live, beginning on
a Hickory Corner near the old meeting house...to the Head of the Still House
Branch and down that to where it crosses the road, coming from the house to
the still house...with the road to the ford of the creek, crossing the
creek...up the creek to the cleared land...to the State road...with the road
to Winkle's line. She is to have all...as long as she lives a widow or
until her death. As soon as she marries, it is to go as I may further
direct.
My mother, MARTHY ROGERS, is also to have her support as one of the family
of said land.
I give to my son, DAVID CARPENTER, the use of my WILKINS plantation as low
down as the cross fence, so long as he stay on it and keep said plantation
up in good fix. Also my Black Mare called Muskat. Also, David to keep up
my mills...if he does so, to pay himself and ovweplus to be sold equally to
directions of my executors.
The balance of my land to be rented or disposed of to the best advantage for
the heirs.
To my son, JACOB, one mare and saddle also $25.
Personal property not mentioned is to be sold on 12-month credit, divided
equally between my sons and daughters. Also, all profit from the rent of
lands equally divided between my sons and daughters, viz, DAVID, BOLIVER,
HUMPHREY, HENRY, BENJAMIN, JACKSON, CAROLINE, AVALINE, AMY, SALLY, and
MATILDA, each one to (get) an equal part as they come of age.
When my son JACKSON arrive at age 21, all lands I possess are to be divided
among my sons: DAVID, BOLIVAR, HUMPHREY, HENRY,BENJAMIN and JACKSON, to sell
or divide as they think best.
Old MRS BRADLEY to have the use of the place she now lives as long as she
lives in the same, and no longer.
To SALLY BRADLEY (sic) all that tract of land formerly old MRS BRADLEY's
that lies on the north side of the branch down to a contiional line between
said BRADLEY and myself.
My friend JACOB PALMER to be executor.
signed WM. CARPENTER
wit: JOHN HOWARD
BET 1794 AND 1795 - >1860 Martha Margaret McConnell Iredell County, NC?

Ancestry.com - Joyce Sammons
~1764 - ~1835 William Sr. McConnell 71 71 From Ancestry.com John W. Andrews Family Tree

Census: 1800 Iredell County, North Carolina
Census: 1810 Haywood County, North Carolina
Census: 1820 Haywood County, North Carolina
Census: 1830 Macon County, North Carolina.
PROP: 1787 Received land grant on branch of Rocky River, Rowam County, North Carolina
PROP: 1796 He had secured Grants before this time on the west bank of Richland Creek and had built a house. "Annals of Haywood County."
PROP: 1797 Bought land in Iredell Coumty, North Carolina from John Armstrong.
PROP: 1807 Sold Iredell property to James Allison McConnell.
PROP: 21 JAN 1807 Bought land on Crabtree Creek , Buncombe Co., NC From Martin Henry.
PROP: 24 NOV 1807 Bought additional land from Robert Moore.
PROP: 1820 In the spring of 1820 a William McConnell had made improvements on a piece of property in District 15 Section 3 of what was to become Macon County, North Carolina
PROP: 22 JUN 1820 Appointed Capt. James Mebane of Orange County, North carolina as his lawful Attorneyto ask for and receive from the State of North Carolina a Military Land Warrant for 640 acres as due and owing him as rhe only legal heir at law of Phillip Mcconnell deceas
PROP: 27 JUL 1820 Claim for 640 acres allowed.
PROP: 14 JUL 1826 William McConnell of Haywood County, NC is bound to David McConnell of Haywood in sum of $500 . William to make David a good and lawful title 105 ac. on west side of Tennessee River, bd. Hemphill. Signed, William McConnell. Wit: James Moore. March 8, 1837
PROP: 23 SEP 1826 Sold 515 acres in Weakley County, Tennessee to Jesse R. Siler.
PROP: 27 JUL 1830 William Mcconnell to David McConnell, both of Macon Co., for $65, 65+ ac., Sec. 1, Dist. 15 on Tennessee River. Signed William McConnell. Wit; John Stevenson, Jacob (his x mark) Cathey. Ack. Sept. 25, 1831. Registered October 8, 1831.
PROP: JUN 1841 Land agreement among descendants. See notes.
PROP: 22 APR 1846 See notes.
Event: Tax List 1835 Macon County, North Carolina. # 267.
Burial: ABT. 1835 McConnell Cemetery, Middle Creek Road, Macon County, North Carolina
Event: Military 1808 Appointed Lieutenant, Militia, Buncombe County, North Carolina
Note:
1810 Census, Haywood County, North Carolina
Page 197 B
McConnel, William 21101-35110-00
Columns, left to right:

Head of household
Free white males, under 10 years of age = William, Jr. (1802), Milas (1806)
Free white males, of 10 years and under 16 = John (1799)
Free white males, of 16 years and under 26 = David A. (1791
Free white males, of 26 years and under 45
Free white males, of 45 years and over = Himself, William , Sr.
Free white females, under 10 years of age = Jane (1810), Elizabeth (1807), Agnes (1804)
Free white females, of 10 years and under 16 = Keziah (1796), Mary (1795), Martha (1794), Sarah (1792) & an unknown
Free white females, of 16 years and under 26 = Another unknown
Free white females, of 26 years and under 45 = Rachel
Free white females, of 45 years and over
All other free persons
Slaves


On June 22, 1820, William McConnell of Haywood County, North Carolina appointed Captain James Mebane of Orange County, NC, as his lawful attorney to ask for and receive from the State of North Carolina a military land warrant for 640 acres as due and owing him by the State of North Carolina as the only legal heir at law of Phillip McConnell deceased. On july 27, 1820 the claim was allowed.
On September 23, 1826 he (William) sold 515 acres in Weakley County, Tennessee to Jesse R, Siler. Apparently part of the land granted him as the heir of Phillip McConnell.

1830 Census, Macon County, North Carolina, Page 22: William McConnell; 1m 15-20, 1m 60-70; 3f 15-20, 1f 20-30, 1f 60-70

February 14, 1840 Deed Book C - #1349
David McConnell, John Scroggs and his wife Polly, Sarah McConnell, Jonathan Denton and his wife Agnes, David Carpenter guardian of heirs of William Carpenter, dec'd, Peggy Carpenter widow of William Carpenter dec'd., Charles Stiles and his wife Kizzy, William McConnell, William Cabe and his wife Elizabeth, Enos Scroggs and his wife Jane, Milas McConnell, John D. Dryman and his wife Rachel, Sanford Carpenter and his wife Patience, heirs at law of William McConnell, dec'd., to John McConnell, for $500, a tract granted to William McConnell, dec'd. on a conditional line made by William McConnell dec'd. and Thomas Kimsey - to the river, to a conditional line between David McConnell and William McConnell, dec'd. containing 150 ac., except the widows thirds during her lifetime. February 14, 1840
Signed;
David (his x mark) McConnell
Sarah (her x mark) McConnell
Jonathan (his x mark) Denton
Agnes (her x mark) Denton
Milas (his x mark) McConnell
Enos Scroggs
Jane Scroggs
William McConnell
Sanford Carpenter
Patience (her x mark) Carpenter
Charles (his x mark) Stiles
Kizzy (her x mark) Stiles
William Cabe
Elizabeth (her x mark) Cabe
John D. Dryman
Rachel (her x mark) Dryman
John Scroggs
Mary (her x mark) Scroggs
Peggy (her x mark) Carpenter
David Carpenter, signed as guardian of William Carpenters heirs.
Witness: Elisha L. Kimsey, J. Howard
Proven by Elisha Kimsey in June 1841Court
Registered: September 10, 1841


April 22, 1846 #66 Deed Book E., Macon County, North Carolina
Heirs of William McConnell, dec'd., of one part, of Macon, to David McConnell, one of the heirs, also of Macon, of the other part, for $250, Part of Sec. 3, Dis. 15 on W. side of Tennessee River. February 15, 1837
Signed:
Milas (his x mark) Mcconnell
Martha (her x mark) McConnell
Enos Scroggs
Jane Scroggs
John D. Scroggs
Mary (her x mark) Scroggs
William Cabe
Elizabeth Cabe
J. D. Dryman
Rachel (her x mark) Dryman
Sarah (her x mark) McConnell
Margaret (her x mark) Carpenter
Jonathan Denton
Agnes (her x mark) Denton
Sanford Carpenter
Patience (her x mark) Carpenter
John McConnell
Mary (her x mark) McConnell
William McConnell
Sarah (her x mark) McConnell
Charles Stiles
Kesiah (her x mark) Stiles
Witness: Milas (his x mark) McConnell, who proved in March 1846 Court.
Registered April 22, 1846


July 6, 2002
Note from Jodie Cole
jodie.cole@@cox.net

"Iredell County Tracts" "Book M, page 11 - Nathaniel and Margaret Bagwell make warantee deed to John Bagwell, their son, for one-third part of land as heirs of Phillip McConnell. Land on Obion River. 11 April 1823"
What is their relationship? JWA

Ancestry.com - Joyce Sammons
~1773 - >1850 Rachel Adams 77 77 Possiby born in Virginia.

Ancestry.com - Joyce Sammons
BET 1732 AND 1739 - 1781 Matthew Adams BET 1734 AND 1740 - UNKNOWN Elizabeth Luke 1738 - 1778 Phillip McConnell 40 40 From the DAR application of Rebecca Anne Brown Perry (denoting lineage from herself to Phillip McConnell):  (found on Ancestry.com, contact C. D. Watson)
"Phillip McConnell served in the Army as a Private in the American Revolution from Rowan County, NC.  He was in Armstrongs Co, 2nd Regiment, NC Continental Line 1777 to 10 September 1778.  After his death, his only son, William McConnell, received for his father's service a land grant or Military land Warrent #374."

From John W. Andrews tree at Ancestry.com "Letter from Libby Donaldson Crawford of Murphy, NC, dated Sept 26, 1989, states Phillip McConnell went to Rowan Co, NC from Lancaster, PA in 1738."
1743 - >1799 Sarah McClelland 56 56 BET 1703 AND 1714 - ~1789 Mary Ross BET 1700 AND 1709 - >1778 William Nicholas McClelland ~1675 - UNKNOWN Nicholas McClelland D. >1836 Martha Ann Rogers Living Lyndsey Living Lyndsey Living Simkin ~1542 - UNKNOWN John Aldridge ~1546 - UNKNOWN Thomas Aldridge ~1572 - UNKNOWN Agnes Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Marie Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Joanne Aldridge 16 JAN 1595/96 - UNKNOWN Margery Aldridge 18 JAN 1599/00 - UNKNOWN Ann Aldridge 3 MAR 1606/07 - UNKNOWN Robert Aldridge 1630 - UNKNOWN Andrew Aldridge 1633 - UNKNOWN George Aldridge 1638 - UNKNOWN Michael Aldridge 1638 - UNKNOWN Robert Aldridge ~1651 - 1663 Joan Aldridge 12 12 1655 - 1661 Jane Aldridge 6 6 1657 - UNKNOWN Mary Aldridge 1663 - UNKNOWN Daniel Aldridge 1659 - 1660 Ann Aldridge 1 1 1680 - UNKNOWN Thomas Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Elizabeth Purdy 1684 - UNKNOWN Anne Aldridge 1688 - UNKNOWN John Aldridge 1689 - UNKNOWN Joanne (Jane) Aldridge 1693 - UNKNOWN Sydney (Janey) Aldridge 1696 - UNKNOWN Jane Aldridge 1698 - UNKNOWN Nicholas Aldridge 1706 - UNKNOWN James A. Aldridge 1710 - UNKNOWN Mary Gassaway D. UNKNOWN Nicholas Gassaway D. UNKNOWN Elizabeth Rachel Hawkins 1729 - UNKNOWN William Ezekiel Aldridge 1745 - 1846 James Aldridge 101 101 D. UNKNOWN Nicholas Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Nathaniel Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Rosanna Kendrick 1768 - UNKNOWN Abner Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Rebecca House 1771 - UNKNOWN Reuben Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Sarah Liverman 1774 - UNKNOWN Sarah Aldridge 1776 - UNKNOWN Tabitha Aldridge 1778 - UNKNOWN Elizabeth Aldridge 1780 - UNKNOWN Susannah Aldridge 1782 - UNKNOWN Jesse Aldridge 1786 - UNKNOWN John Aldridge 1789 - UNKNOWN Nathan Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Aquilla House D. UNKNOWN Martha ? 1812 - 1881 Washington Hamilton Aldridge 69 69 1830 - 1883 Julia Ann Hendrix 53 53 D. UNKNOWN Abner Jefferson Bell Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Reuben Hendrix 1845 - 1876 William James Aldridge 31 31 ~1844 - UNKNOWN Lutitia Sibley 1847 - UNKNOWN Anne Rebecca Aldridge 1849 - UNKNOWN Charles Washington Aldridge 1852 - UNKNOWN Augustus Murat Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Josephine Vidler 1855 - UNKNOWN Aberdeen Aldridge 1856 - UNKNOWN California Adeline Aldridge 1859 - UNKNOWN Frances Harriet Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Samuel Mitchell 1861 - UNKNOWN Louisiana Bell Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Edmund Smith 1863 - UNKNOWN Pinckney Beauregard Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Lorena Viddler 1866 - UNKNOWN Susan Alice Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Johnathon Carter Ryan 1870 - UNKNOWN Dread Thomas Aldridge D. UNKNOWN William Sibley D. UNKNOWN Matilda ? ~1866 - UNKNOWN John W. Aldridge 1868 - UNKNOWN Willie Leroy Aldridge 1872 - 1944 Martha Lucinda Chance 72 72 1870 - UNKNOWN Thaddeus Monroe Aldridge 1872 - UNKNOWN Nancy Jane Aldridge 1874 - UNKNOWN Julia Elizabeth Aldridge 1876 - UNKNOWN Jimmee Louisa Aldridge D. UNKNOWN James L. Chance D. UNKNOWN Lacey Irene Owers 1895 - UNKNOWN Hattie Aldridge 1897 - UNKNOWN Annie Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Bennett Wilfred Lyons 1901 - UNKNOWN Nora Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Clarence Leonard Lyons 1907 - UNKNOWN Goldia Aldridge D. UNKNOWN Leaman Aldridge ? 1658 - UNKNOWN Anne ? D. UNKNOWN William Besson D. UNKNOWN Thomas Besson ~1658 - <1692 Anne Besson 34 34 D. UNKNOWN John Besson BET 1835 AND 1841 - UNKNOWN Isaac Seidel or Sidle On the Ohio 1910 Census Miracode Index, he is listed as Isic Sidle and is shown living with his son George Sidle in Henry Co, Ohio.  He was 72.

Isaac's last name is noted as Seidel in the Civil War Service Records.


~1844 - UNKNOWN Martha L. Cook Living Harkins Private Marie ? ~1790 - >1880 Elisha Henson 90 90